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5×12 House / TOOB STUDIO

first_img “COPY” Vietnam ArchDaily 5×12 House / TOOB STUDIO ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/893998/5×12-house-toob-studio Clipboard Projects “COPY” Houses Save this picture!© Lê Anh Đức+ 35Curated by Fernanda Castro Share 2018 CopyAbout this officeTOOB STUDIOOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousestt. Trâu QuỳVietnamPublished on May 09, 2018Cite: “5×12 House / TOOB STUDIO” 09 May 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodWood Siding in KSR Villa BodrumRailing / BalustradesMitrexIntegrated Photovoltaic Railing – BIPV RailingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Surface: Nordic DécorWindowsAir-LuxSliding Window – CorneringWoodBruagRoom Acoustics – Interior Cladding PanelsSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Frequency® FL-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoInternal Walls – Trimoterm, Qbiss OneGlassSolarluxWintergarden – SDL Akzent plusSystems / Prefabricated PanelsInvestwoodCement Bonded Particle Board – VirocPaintKEIMMineral Paint in Hunters Point LibraryCabinetsburgbadMid-Height Cabinet – EssentoSignage / Display SystemsGlasbau HahnMuseum Display CasesMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamcenter_img Photographs 5×12 House / TOOB STUDIOSave this projectSave5x12 House / TOOB STUDIO Architects: TOOB STUDIO Area Area of this architecture project Year:  Photographs:  Lê Anh Đức Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Area:  100 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/893998/5×12-house-toob-studio Clipboard CopyHouses•tt. Trâu Quỳ, Vietnam Manufacturers: Green space, BETONLAB, LAI WOOD, THẢO STEELSave this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcRecommended ProductsDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteDoorsStudcoAccess Panels – AccessDorWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityDoorsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Entice Series Entrance SystemText description provided by the architects. The project is built on a land area of 5mx20m with an airy surfaceAfter leaving a part of the area for the front yard and backyard in accordance with the planning of the city, the remaining building area is 5mx12m, the typical area for the “portion house ” in Vietnam.Save this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcWhen approaching from the spaces of traditional housing, we find that the “buffer zone” is a very important space that many modern homes today are no longer able to hold, namely the porch, the loggia, the middle yard…Save this picture!ModelIn this space, a renewal impact has been brought by external elements upon the interior, which has actively promoted the initiative the to control the impact of the user. Save this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcDue to the limited width and depth, portion house’s structure is usually developed in height. Therefore, we put buffer spaces alternatively between private spaces, their forms and positions are different between floors. The buffer zones, in this case, play roles as traffic or public areas, where family members will connect more in these spaces.Save this picture!PlanSave this picture!PlanSave this picture!PlanThe “buffer space” is like an important chain linking between private spaces, and with the exterior as well.Save this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcFinally, we control the effects of the external environment on the interior at these buffer spaces. Save this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcNatural light is brought into the buffer space but it must limit the thermal effect to deep in the interior; the wind entrance is created while the exit is also open.Save this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcAs a result, space is static, but its inner body is always moving.  Besides, we always search for natural materials in those buffer zones in order to be suitable with external elements. Save this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcFinally, that the combination of materials, light, and swirl air themselves have been creating a fresh and comfortable feeling for users without any decorations.Save this picture!© Lê Anh ĐứcProject gallerySee allShow lessHouse with a Missing Column / Christian KerezSelected ProjectsTomi House / Takeru Shoji ArchitectsSelected Projects Sharelast_img read more

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Six years after journalist’s murder, authorities urged to let media breathe

first_img Follow the news on Gambia to go further August 6, 2020 Find out more Organisation Gambia still needs to address challenges to press freedom Three journalist arrested, two radio stations closed in Gambia January 27, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information News Receive email alerts RSF_en center_img News July 23, 2019 Find out more GambiaAfrica December 16, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Six years after journalist’s murder, authorities urged to let media breathe On the sixth anniversary of leading Gambian journalist Deyda Hydara’s still unsolved murder, Reporters Without Borders appeals to the authorities to stop obstructing an independent investigation and urges President Yahya Jammeh to liberalize the country’s media legislation by repealing the laws that were adopted in 2004.Hydara’s murder on 16 December 2004 and the promulgation two weeks later of the Newspaper Amendment Act 2004 and the Criminal Code Amendment Bill 2004 ended an era in which the privately-owned media could stand up to the government. Since then, Gambia’s journalists have lived in fear of legislation on defamation and the “publication of false information” that is among the most repressive in West Africa.“The authorities have always blocked the investigation into Deyda Hydara’s death, making it impossible for the truth to emerge,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Jean-François Julliard said. “Six years later, we fear that justice will never be rendered. His colleagues continue to endure President Jammeh’s hostility towards the media. We urge him to amend the press laws and finally let the press breathe.”The joint founder and editor of the daily The Point, the Gambia correspondent of Agence France-Presse and Reporters Without Borders, and the former president of the Gambia Press Union, Hydara was at the wheel of his car in a Banjul suburb on the evening of 16 December when he was shot dead by unidentified gunmen travelling in a taxi.After carrying out its own investigation in Banjul, Reporters Without Borders issued a report in entitled “Deyda Hydara, the death of a journalist under surveillance” in which it said there were serious grounds for suspecting that the Gambian security services, working with a semi-clandestine group of Jammeh supporters called the Green Boys, killed Hydara because of his frequent criticism of the government and his ability to influence his fellow journalists.The Gambian authorities promised to investigate Hydara’s murder but no serious investigation was ever carried out. A “confidential report” by the National Intelligence Agency (NIA) was given to the press in 2005 but it contained little aside from some absurd theories about his death. It was the only official document about Hydara’s murder ever released by the authorities.Since then, most of the key potential witnesses have disappeared, including the then head of the NIA, Daba Marenah. There has been no word of Marenah since he was arrested after being implicated in an alleged coup attempt.President Jammeh has on several occasions denied any government role in the murder, suggesting instead that his death was linked to a romantic liaison. News News Gambia: former president must stand trial for journalist’s murder GambiaAfrica last_img read more

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Cope to run again in European Parliament Elections

first_img By News Highland – March 16, 2014 Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Twitter Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Fianna Fáil has chosen two candidates to contest the European elections in the Midlands-North West region.Sitting MEP Pat the Cope Gallagher and Meath Senator Thomas Byrne were selected by more than 600 party members at a convention in Mullingar, Co Westmeath this afternoon.Pat the Cope Gallagher from Burtonport in Donegal currently represents the Ireland North West region at the European Parliament.  He has previously represented the people of Donegal South West in Dáil Éireann where he served as Minister of State across several Departments.Senator Thomas Byrne, a father of three from east Meath, represented the people of Co Meath in Dáil Éireann between 2007 and 2011. He was elected to Seanad Éireann in 2011, where he currently holds the position of Fianna Fáil’s Spokesperson on Public Expenditure. WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th center_img Facebook Google+ News Pinterest Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Previous articleUdaras urged to offer new incentive package to keep Largo Foods in GweedoreNext articleTaoiseach seeks movement on status of undocumented during US visit News Highland WhatsApp Cope to run again in European Parliament Elections 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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Draft Competition (Amendment) Bill, 2020: Welcome Changes And Missed Opportunities

first_imgColumnsDraft Competition (Amendment) Bill, 2020: Welcome Changes And Missed Opportunities Avinash Amarnath & Srishti Sharma14 April 2020 8:34 PMShare This – xThe draft Competition (Amendment) Bill, 2020 (“Bill”) was released on 12 February 2020 suggesting a variety of amendments to the Competition Act, 2002 (“Act”) after a gap of almost 13 years. The last major amendments to the Act took place in 2007. The Bill is largely based on a report dated July 2019 prepared by the Competition Law Review Committee (“CLRC”) set up in October 2018 to…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe draft Competition (Amendment) Bill, 2020 (“Bill”) was released on 12 February 2020 suggesting a variety of amendments to the Competition Act, 2002 (“Act”) after a gap of almost 13 years. The last major amendments to the Act took place in 2007. The Bill is largely based on a report dated July 2019 prepared by the Competition Law Review Committee (“CLRC”) set up in October 2018 to review the Act and suggest changes to make the competition regime more effective. While the original mandate of the CLRC was broad and envisaged a substantive review of the Act and the competition regime, a review of the amendments suggested in the Bill show that the amendments are limited to: a) correcting any blatant errors identified in practice; b) making explicit in the Act certain principles developed through decisional practice; and c) provisions to improve ease of doing business. The Bill proposes to insert a total of 12 new sections, omits 4 sub-sections and proposes amendments to several other sections. In this paper, we review some of the welcome changes, certain changes which raise issues and challenges and certain missed opportunities in the Bill. Welcome changes Settlements and Commitments: The Bill proposes to add two new sections 48A and 48B to the Act enabling parties to offer settlements and commitments to close antitrust proceedings (except cartels). Settlements usually involve an admission of guilt in exchange for a certain discount on the penalty amount payable and early closure of proceedings. Commitments usually do not involve an admission of guilt but an undertaking to change future conduct to correct the concerns identified in exchange for early closure of proceedings. Settlements and commitments are commonly used tools in developed competition jurisdictions such as the European Union (“EU”) to close proceedings and save administrative and judicial time and costs when parties are willing to admit guilt and settle or offer commitments to change conduct. Introduction of such provisions into the Indian system is certainly welcome as in India as well, several parties are often willing to settle or offer commitments in exchange for early closure of proceedings. This would also help the Competition Commission of India (“CCI”) and the office of the Director General (“DG”) prioritise and allocate its limited resources better. It is understood that the settlement and commitment provisions in the Bill have been kept skeletal because the detailed procedure has been envisaged to be brought in through regulations. However, it appears that there are certain lacunae even in the basic principles which ought to be incorporated in the Act. First, the provision for settlement does not specify that an admission of guilt is required by the parties. While the proposed Section 48A(3) does specify that the settlement would be on the terms as may be specified by the CCI, it is unclear whether this would necessarily require an admission of guilt in each case. If the requirement of admission of guilt is brought in through regulations, this may be subject to challenge as the regulations may be seen as going beyond the statute. Similarly, the incentive of offering commitments is that there is no finding of infringement. However, the proposed Section 48B does not explicitly mention that there would be no finding of infringement in a commitments decision. Another major lacuna in relation to commitments is the lack of a provision for market testing of the commitments offered by parties. Since commitments would usually relate to the business conduct of a party, it is well accepted practice that the commitments offered by a party are market tested i.e. other stakeholders such as competitors, suppliers and customers are consulted on the viability of the commitments offered by a party under investigation before accepting them. According to an OECD paper, two common features across most commitment regimes in the world are market testing and adoption of commitments without any legal sanction. These two elements are currently lacking in the proposed provision in the Bill. All final orders made appealable: Section 53A of the Act allows appeals from the orders of the CCI passed under certain specified sections of the Act to the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal (NCLAT). This provision came up for interpretation in the first major competition case to reach the Supreme Court i.e. Competition Commission of India v Steel Authority of India Ltd and Anr (2010)10 SCC 744. In this case, the Supreme Court was deciding whether a prima facie order of investigation passed under Section 26(1) was appealable under Section 53A. Taking a strict and literal interpretation of Section 53A, the court held that appeals would lie only against orders passed under those sections specifically mentioned in Section 53A. Since the legislature had consciously not included Section 26(1) in the list of appealable orders, no appeal would lie against such an order. An order for investigation under Section 26(1) was merely an administrative direction that did not entail any civil consequences for the party being investigated. An unfortunate consequence of this strict interpretation and a drafting error in Section 53A was that certain final orders which are passed after the DG’s investigation also became non appealable. A series of decisions of the erstwhile Competition Appellate Tribunal (whose powers have now been transferred to the NCLAT) in Jindal Steel and Power Ltd v CCI and Ors (Appeal No. 45/2012), Arshiya Rail Infrastructure Ltd v CCI and Ors (Appeal No. 136/2012) and Saurabh Tripathy v CCI and Anr (Appeal No. 16/2017) have held that an order passed by the CCI where the DG recommends a contravention of the Act but the CCI disagrees with the DG’s recommendation and closes the matter would not be appealable as it is not an order passed under any of the sections specified under Section 53A. This was an unfortunate situation as despite being a final adjudicatory order deciding rights of the parties, no appeal was allowed due to a technical interpretation. Thankfully, the Bill seeks to correct this anomaly by making appropriate amendments to Sections 26 and 53A of the Act.Inclusion of supply side substitutability in definition of ‘relevant product market’: It is a well-established principle of competition law that in defining the relevant market, primacy is given to the interchangeability or substitutability of products/services from a consumer’s perspective i.e. demand side substitutability. However, as a secondary principle, competition authorities also look at substitutability from a supplier’s perspective i.e. whether a supplier is able to switch production to a different product/service in the short term without incurring significant additional costs in response to small but significant changes in price. The often quoted example of supply side substitutability is that of paper. Different grades of paper such as white paper, craft paper, glossy paper etc. serve different end uses and are not substitutable from a consumer’s perspective. A consumer looking for plain white paper for printing a legal document would not switch to craft paper if the price of plain white paper increased. However, from a paper mill’s perspective, it may be possible for the mill to switch to production of different grades of paper in the short term without incurring significant additional costs in response to changes in price of different grades of paper. Therefore, all grades of paper may constitute part of the same relevant market. The principle of supply side substitutability is recognised by the European Commission in its Relevant Market Notice. Under the Act, demand side substitutability was expressly recognised in the definition of ‘relevant product market’ under Section 2(t). While supply side substitutability was not expressly recognised under the definition, the CCI, through its decisional practice particularly in decisions relating to combinations has applied the concept of supply side substitutability while defining the relevant product market. The Bill now seeks to expressly include the concept of supply side substitutability into the definition of ‘relevant product market’ under the Act.Explicit inclusion of ‘buyers’ cartel’ in definition of ‘cartel’: Section 3(3) of the Act deals with horizontal agreement between competitors engaged in identical or similar trade including cartels. The definition of ‘cartel’ earlier only included an association of producers, sellers, distributors, traders or service providers but not buyers. It has long been well established under competition law that a cartel could occur on either side of the market i.e. on the selling side or the procurement side. Arguably buyers’ cartels were already included under Section 3(3) at least as far as price fixing is concerned as Section 3(3)(a) covers the fixing of sale prices as well as ‘purchase prices’. However, this addition now makes it abundantly clear that buyers’ cartels are included under Section 3(3).Inclusion of facilitators of cartels and hub and spoke cartels under Section 3(3): The Bill proposes to add a proviso to Section 3(3) providing that any enterprise or association of enterprises, person or association of persons, though not engaged in identical or similar trade will be presumed to be part of the horizontal agreement/cartel if it actively participates in the furtherance of such an agreement. This proviso aims at catching two concepts within the scope of Section 3(3). The first is a well-recognised principle of competition law of penalising cartel facilitators. Facilitators of cartels may not be directly involved in the business but may aid in the furtherance of the cartel by facilitating exchange of commercially sensitive information, coordination, monitoring etc. In AC Treuhand, the European courts confirmed that a consultancy firm could be penalised under the cartel provisions for having facilitated the cartel. The proviso also brings in the possibility of catching what are popularly called ‘hub and spoke’ cartels. A hub and spoke cartel involves a triangular arrangement where a common hub (e.g. a supplier) facilitates a cartel between various spokes (e.g. retailers). The catch in such an arrangement is that the hub and spokes are not engaged in identical or similar trade. Hub and spoke cartels are still an evolving concept globally and there are not many cases till date. The United Kingdom (UK) has prosecuted a few hub and spoke cartel cases. However, strict evidentiary requirements have been laid down. Three limbs are required to prove a hub and spoke cartel as laid by the UK Court of Appeal in Argos Ltd and another v Office of Fair Trading, JJB Sports plc v Office of Fair Trading i.e. (i) [where] retailer A discloses to supplier B its future pricing intentions in circumstances where A may be taken to intend that B will make use of that information to influence market conditions by passing that information to other retailers (of whom C is or may be one); (ii) B does in fact, pass that information to C in circumstances where C may be taken to know the circumstances in which the information was disclosed by A to B and (iii) C does, in fact, use the information in determining its own future pricing intentions. Therefore, while there is nothing wrong in having an enabling provision to catch hub and spoke cartels, the CCI would do well to keep in mind the strict evidentiary requirements for proving hub and spoke cartels. Otherwise, there is a risk of over intervention as normal commercial practices may end up being caught. E.g. it is normal commercial practice for a retailer to share pricing information with its supplier in order to determine strategy. This cannot by itself constitute a hub and spoke cartel without the other limbs being satisfied. Flexibility for implementation of open offers pending approval of the CCI: Open market transactions i.e. acquisitions of shares on the stock exchange constitute a peculiar class of transactions where due to strict stock exchange regulations, once an open offer is made, consideration must be paid to any shareholder who tenders his/her shares to the acquirer almost immediately. However, if such a transaction requires approval from the CCI, then it must comply with the standstill obligation under the Act (Section 6(2A)) i.e. the transaction cannot be consummated until CCI approval. This leads to a conundrum for acquirers in such transactions as payment to shareholders would amount to consummation of the purchase and a violation of the Act. This issue came up before the Supreme Court of India in SCM Soilfert v Competition Commission of India (2018)6 SCC 631. The court took a strict interpretation and held that there was no exemption contemplated for open market transactions and thereby upheld a penalty imposed by the CCI on the acquirer for consummating the transaction prior to CCI approval. The Bill recognises this conundrum and seeks to introduce a provision allowing for the implementation of open market transactions provided that the CCI is notified within such specified time and manner, the shares or securities are maintained in a specified manner and the acquirer does not exercise any ownership or beneficial rights or interest in such shares or convertible securities including voting rights etc., till the CCI approves the transaction. This provision is a welcome change as it recognises a regulatory clash and seeks to provide flexibility in relation to the same. Issues and missed opportunities Introduction of a ‘Governing Board’: The Bill envisages certain structural changes to the CCI and creates a new ‘Governing Board’ which would consist of: a) members of the CCI; b) Secretary of the Department of Economic Affairs, Ministry of Finance or his nominee; c) Secretary of the Ministry of Corporate Affairs or his nominee; and d) four Part-Time members to be appointed by the Central Government. The Governing Board would be responsible for the general superintendence, direction and management of affairs of the CCI including framing regulations ‘in matters relating to competition’ and administration of affairs of the CCI, entering into memorandums, agreements or contracts with other statutory authorities or government departments on behalf of CCI, taking competition advocacy measures and assisting the Central Government in the development and implementation of a National Competition Policy. However, the Governing Board would not hear and adjudicate cases and this power remains with the Chairperson and members of the CCI. The rationale behind the Governing Board as set out in the CLRC report is to ‘bring in an external perspective, objectivity and more transparency in the functioning of the CCI’ and ‘ensure a more robust governance structure for the CCI by bringing in an external perspective as well as strengthening the democratic legitimacy and accountability of the CCI’. While these are certainly laudable objectives, neither the CLRC report nor the Bill are able to point to any tangible flaws with the current system or that the current structure of the CCI is not able to achieve these objectives. CUTS, a research organisation had noted in relation to the Indian system that “[f]ortunately, on the operational side, the Commission is relatively independent and the intrusion of the government is negligible. The Act has significantly protected the operational and decision making functions of the Commission through checks and balances provided by the independent judicial branch (The Competition Appellate Tribunal and eventually the Supreme Court).” The introduction of the Governing Board appears to go against the stated objectives of objectivity and transparency by vesting wide powers in a board that may be overwhelmingly controlled by the government. Independence of competition authorities from vested interest and political control is an essential pre-requisite for a robust competition law enforcement. According to an OECD paper, almost all competition laws across the world aim to ensure independence of the competition authorities from political and government interference. The Treaty of the European Union explicitly recognises this principle in relation to the European Commission and provides that “[i]n carrying out its responsibilities, the Commission shall be completely independent. Without prejudice to Article 18(2), the members of the Commission shall neither seek nor take instructions from any Government or other institution, body, office or entity. They shall refrain from any action incompatible with their duties or the performance of their tasks”. The CLRC report tries to compare and borrow from experiences of other regulators in India such as the Securities and Exchange Board of India (“SEBI”) or the Reserve Bank of India (“RBI”). However, it should be noted that unlike these regulators, while the CCI is also an expert body, the adjudicatory function carried out by the CCI is the primary and probably the most important of its functions. The consequences of CCI’s adjudicatory powers can be grave and severe for parties. It would not be wrong to suggest that a majority of the CCI’s resources and time are dedicated towards the adjudicatory function. Therefore, ensuring independence of this key adjudicatory function from political and governmental interference becomes all the more critical. While the CLRC report states that the adjudication of individual cases will be left to the CCI, the provisions as currently envisaged in the Bill do not appear to ensure sufficient independence to the CCI from governmental control. No qualifications have been prescribed for Part-time Members and no provisions have been made to ensure their independence from Governmental control. Since they are appointed by the Central Government there are concerns that they may ‘toe the Government line’ in all decisions of the Governing Board. This would mean that six (6) members out of a possible thirteen (13) members would be government officials or toeing the government line which is a significant number given that all decisions of the Governing Board are to be taken by a simple majority of members present and voting. Further, the role of superintendence and management and the power to make regulations “on matters relating to competition” confers a very wide power on the Governing Board to steer enforcement priorities and resources of the CCI. Finally, there is no clear provision for protecting the individual decision making process of the CCI from interference by the Governing Board. In our view, the Central Government may need to reconsider the very need for such a Governing Board. Even if such a Governing Board is considered absolutely necessary, the Central Government may consider inserting suitable provisions to: a) prescribe qualifications for Part-time members and provide security of tenure and terms of payment which would ensure independence of Part-time members from Government or political influence; b) clarify in greater detail what is meant by “matters relating to competition” and that this does not include the power to decide, influence directly or indirectly or steer the enforcement priorities or resources of the CCI; c) make explicit that the Governing Board would not interfere or influence directly or indirectly the decision making process of the CCI.No provision for judicial member: In Mahindra Electric Mobility Ltd and Anr v Competition Commission of India 2019 SCCOnline Del 8032, the Delhi High Court held that all final orders of the CCI must be passed in the presence of a judicial member. As discussed above, this was to ensure judicial expertise and independence from executive influence while passing adjudicatory orders. This is critical given the important judicial function carried out by the CCI. It is unfortunate that the CCI has been functioning without a judicial member for over two (2) years now. While the CCI did recently put out a notification for filling up the vacancy for a judicial member, the Bill provided a good opportunity to crystallise the requirement for a judicial member into law. As the Act stands currently, it is not mandatory to have a judicial member as part of the CCI. However, no amendments have been suggested in the Bill in this regard. Overall, many changes proposed in the Bill are welcome as they crystallise well settled principles into law. However, one retrograde step certainly appears to be the introduction of the Governing Board and the Bill appears to have missed a step in not introducing into the law the requirement of a judicial member.(Avinash Amarnath is an Advocate-on-Record at the Supreme Court of India. Srishti Sharma is a 5th year law student at the Institute of Law, Nirma University. Views are personal) Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Manhunt underway for person of interest in shooting of two Dallas police officers, civilian

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — A manhunt is underway for a person of interest in the North Dallas shooting that injured two police officers and a civilian at a Home Depot, authorities said.911 dispatchers received a call to go to the Home Depot shortly after 4:12 p.m., Dallas Police Chief Renee Hall said in a press conference Tuesday night. After the responding officers arrived, a subsequent call for assistance was made after the shooting began.Two Dallas Police officers were critically wounded, the Dallas Police Department posted on Twitter shortly after the shooting. A civilian who is a loss prevention officer for Home Depot was also shot, Hall said. His or her condition is unknown at this time, police said.Police were actively searching for the person of interest in a nearby wooded area on Tuesday afternoon. Authorities identified him as 29-year-old Armando Luis Juarez, who possibly left the location in a white pickup truck.Juarez is to be considered and dangerous, Hall said, adding that it is unclear “how he was able to get a gun and shoot all three of the victims.”Hall asked the community to contact police if they see Juarez or have any information on who and where he is.The officers were transported by the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department to the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where they are getting the “best possible care,” Hall said.Hall did not release their names or an update on their conditions when speaking to the media out of respect for the families, she said.Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings described the aftermath of the shooting as a “two-front battle,” referring to the victims’ battles for their lives at the hospital as well as “the battle out in the community” to find the person of interest.The police department asked for prayers for the victims and their families.“I want to ask each and every one of you for your prayers … for our officers, for their families and for our entire DPD family, because we need you right now,” Hall said. “Our hearts are very heavy.”State, local and federal law enforcement agencies responded to the scene.In 2016, five Dallas law enforcement officers were shot and killed and seven more injured after they were ambushed by 25-year-old former Army reservist Micah Xavier Johnson. Johnson later died in a standoff with police.Former Dallas Police Chief and ABC News contributor David Brown said the most recent shooting on two Dallas police officers is “too much to bear for one department in such a short time frame.”“Once again, it sobers us to realize what officers walk into day in and day out, how quickly they can become victims,” Rawlings said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Wheels in Motion For More Bike-Friendly Amenities in O.C.

first_imgBy MADDY VITALEAll one has to do is take a walk downtown or in any neighborhood in Ocean City and there they are — bicyclists — lots of them.In a community that has become a bicycling haven for visitors and residents, turning off the ignition and hopping on two wheels to let your body do the work is one way people are staying in shape. And while doing so they are also improving the quality of life by cutting down on traffic congestion and emissions.A grant application for Cape May County will allow improvements to Ocean City’s biking infrastructure along with amenities in a proposal that has been in the works for over a decade.The application, on the city’s website www.ocnj.us, explains it best:“The City of Ocean City and the County of Cape May are proposing to provide the biking infrastructure to promote increased biking in the city, improving air quality and reducing traffic congestion. This project would coincide with the city’s Complete Streets Policy and city-wide bike routes,” it reads.Improvements would include 40 bike racks and a biking pocket shelter.The racks would be installed at the following locations:Boardwalk street ends from North Street to 23rd StreetBeach Street ends from 23rd Street to 59th StreetAnd racks as needed within the cityOfficials agreed there are many benefits to the project.Not only would it enhance the number of bicyclists in the community and improve fitness and the environment, but it would also stimulate economic development and smart growth in the downtown, and create public spaces that connect the community, according to the grant application.Ocean City residents and visitors use their bikes to go everywhere in the community including the Community Center at 1735 Simpson Ave.Cape May County Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton, who is on the South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization (SJTPO), said of the project, “The County of Cape May is pleased to help facilitate the application by the City of Ocean City to the South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization for grant funds in support of new bicycle system improvements in Ocean City.”Thornton continued, “The current project includes the establishment of designated bicycle parking facilities at multiple beach/Boardwalk access points throughout the city. The hope is that these improvements will help to increase safety and organization at the street-end locations and will encourage our residents and visitors to use bicycles to get to the beach and other activities along the oceanfront.”Ocean City’s Public Information Officer Doug Bergen said of the joint effort between the city and the county, “As always, the city is grateful for the county’s partnership in improving infrastructure and recreational facilities and amenities.”Officials noted that former Cape May County Engineer Dale Foster was closely involved with the project. Foster used congestion management air quality funding to create enhancements throughout Ocean City, including bicycle racks and signage, to encourage people to use bicycles instead of cars.Freeholder Will Morey, who is the liaison for Open Space and Farmland Preservation, said the freeholders have been focused on developing bicycle-related facilities throughout the county.He said there have been great strides in the project while working with municipal partners in developing a comprehensive bicycle network with amenities throughout the county.“It is wonderful to see how the city has undertaken the pursuit of SJTPO funding to add to the city’s network and to provide bicyclists with the facilities they need,” Morey said. “Getting people out of cars and onto their bikes will help ease traffic congestion, parking woes, and will ultimately lead to a healthier community.”Bike racks will be installed at street ends of the Boardwalk. Ocean City is a mecca for bicyclists from the downtown to the Boardwalk to the nature preserve.last_img read more

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Greggs still top of the shops but Subway makes up ground

first_imgBakery chain Greggs has topped British Baker’s annual Top 50 bakery retailers list for the second year running, despite mounting competition from franchise chains, including sandwich giant Subway and cafe operator Costa Coffee.Greggs currently has 1,368 outlets in the UK, up 53 on last year, ahead of number two Subway, which opened 240 outlets over the year and now has 1,020. Cafe chain Costa Coffee is at number three with 660 outlets, including 160 opened over the course of 2007.Greggs’ nearest traditional bakery rival is Lyndale Foods, which has 201 outlets, branded Sayers, Hampsons and Maison Blanc, down 44 year-on-year.Greggs’ MD Sir Michael Darrington told British Baker he put the bakery chain’s success down to “a great team of people, making enjoyable-tasting products”. Last year saw Greggs test innovative new formats, he said, and over the next year, nationwide expansion will continue, with these new formats pushed harder. Details were under wraps and customers would be the first to see developments, he said.Ideas on trial nationwide include extended opening hours, range changes and new branding, including a Fresh to Go branded outlet in Lincoln.Kevin Graham, Subway regional director for Europe, Israel and South Africa, said that Subway’s rapid expansion reflected a growing trend for offering customers choice. “Customers like to personalise their sandwiches by choosing everything from the bread to the sauce, which is only possible if it is made in front of them as Subway does,” he said.New names on the list this year include Patisserie Holdings at number 22, formed through the buyout of the Druckers and Patisserie Valerie chains by entrepreneur Luke Johnson.Names which no longer feature include last year’s number 20, the sandwich chain Benjy’s, which went bust early in 2007. Meanwhile, Cooplands of Scarborough acquired last year’s number 24, AC Skelton & Sons from administration in June.Full details, pages 16-18.last_img read more

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Press release: Unemployment levels at record low

first_img The unemployment rate is down to its lowest ever level of 3.1% from over 8% in the wake of the recession and, crucially, the employment rate is up to one of the highest rates on record at 69.7%. Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, the Rt Hon Karen Bradley MP, said: This Government is committed to delivering a United Kingdom that works for everyone and so I welcome today’s Labour Market Statistics, which show a continued strength in the Northern Ireland economy.center_img More than 15,000 new jobs were created over the last year, meaning more people with the security of a regular pay packet to provide for themselves and their families.last_img

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Press release: New UK aid for safe and dignified burials to tackle Ebola in DRC

first_img Email [email protected] This outbreak has reached a tipping point. We need to double down on our efforts to contain, control and end this outbreak. Community engagement and accountability will be critical for an effective response. We thank the UK government for its support. It will ensure that Red Cross volunteers – all of whom come from the affected area – can maintain their engagement with communities, understanding their fears and concerns and adapting our response accordingly and appropriately. Harriett Baldwin MP, UK Minister for Africa, has announced new funding to help deal with the Ebola crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), on a four-day visit to the country.It is the first visit by any UK Minister to the country since the Ebola outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces began last August. The UK remains one of the largest donors to the outbreak and has taken the threat of Ebola seriously since the start.On Monday she announced that new UK aid funds would be provided to the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC) to help carry out safe and dignified burials.Bodies of Ebola victims are particularly infectious, with transmission of the disease often occurring at funerals where people help wash their loved ones before interment. Burials have been a contentious issue in DRC as Ebola victims are put in body bags and cannot be touched.The new DFID support will provide IFRC burial teams with essential equipment – including gloves, hand disinfectant, masks, protective gowns, goggles, decontamination sprayers, stretchers and rope, as well as biohazardous body bags. The newly introduced body bags will also come with a clear plastic window so that relatives can see their loved one as they’re laid to rest.One of the major barriers in tackling the Ebola outbreak has been a breakdown of trust between the affected community and those trying to lead the response. This new support will help local people better understand the precautions and preventative measures they need to take at funerals.Minister for Africa, Harriett Baldwin said: DRC is battling the second largest Ebola outbreak in history and the first-ever in a conflict zone, with more than 70 armed groups operating in the east of the country. The number of cases has surpassed 1,800 and the death toll has exceeded 1,200.Given the deteriorating situation, the International Development Secretary announced last week that the UK would be providing more funds and sending more UK experts to help strengthen the response.After the West Africa outbreak in 2014, DFID funded the trial of a vaccine, which has been used during the current outbreak to great effect to vaccinate people who have been in contact with confirmed Ebola cases. The UK has also provided technical expertise through the UK Public Health England Rapid Support Team, and funding to help neighbouring countries prepare should the deadly virus spread across borders.Notes to editors IFRC Secretary General, Elhadj As Sy said: If you have an urgent media query, please email the DFID Media Team on [email protected] in the first instance and we will respond as soon as possible. The Government of DRC has requested that donors do not announce specific funding figures to avoid putting first-line responders at further risk of attack. The UK is calling for a new, stronger approach to responding to the Ebola outbreak, including tackling the mistrust of communities, which have suffered decades of conflict, and in some cases do not believe Ebola is real. The World Health Organisation assesses the risk of regional spread as very high, particularly to neighbouring countries (South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi). Public Health England considers the risk to the UK to be very low/negligible. To download photos from IFRC activities in North Kivu please click here. The IFRC’s Safe and Dignified Burial teams tend to comprise of six specially trained volunteers. The kits provided will enable them to carry out 20 burials. Kits for burials in North Kivu contain:center_img The situation on the ground in DRC is extremely precarious. Health workers are operating in a dangerous context, but there is also a lot of mistrust among the community, with some believing that Ebola is not real. We must help change that. We learnt from the West Africa outbreak that safe burial practices were a real turning point in gripping the crisis. This new UK aid funding I’m announcing today will help build trust in affected communities by improving local understanding of the work of the burial teams. We are also calling on our international partners to step up to help fill the funding gap. The UK has been a major donor to the response and we need others to follow our lead – after all, disease does not respect borders. General media queries (24 hours) Telephone 020 7023 0600 ENDS 200 disposable gloves 200 metres of rope 120 masks 100 biohazardous material bags 80 hoods with integrated masks 80 hooded coveralls 50 disposable protective gowns 6 goggles 6 heavy duty reusable aprons 6 chemical protection gloves 1 stretcher 1 backpack sprayer that can contain 12 litres of disinfectantlast_img read more

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King Crimson Will Tour In 2017 With A “Double Quartet Formation”

first_imgIn a recent digital diary entry, guitarist Robert Fripp revealed that King Crimson will return to the road in 2017 for a United States tour. According to Fripp, “King Crimson’s 2017 touring will be mostly in the US, beginning in Seattle and down the West Coast during early June to July; continuing to the East Coast in the Autumn.”He also reveals that drummer Bill Rieflin will return to the band after sabbatical, alongside guitarist Jakko Jakszyk, bassist Tony Levin, saxophonist Mel Collins, and drummers Gavin Harrison, Pat Mastelotto and Jeremy Stacey. He continues in a later post, “Existing repertoire will be re-calibrated for the about-to-be-becoming King Crimson Double Quartet Formation. King Crimson is the first group of which Jeremy has been a full-member. Jeremy became a full-contributor to the Seven-Headed Beast during the 2017 EuroTour, a remarkable achievement for Jezza to adopt the entire repertoire on both drums and keyboards. Bill is presently returning from his Sabbatical, and now The Beast has Eight Heads. Jeremy and Bill are both multi-instrumental, so King Crimson is likely to be making a lot more noise than before. Even.”Check out this footage from King Crimson live in Bonn from 2000:[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

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