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Yard House / alberto facundo _arquitectura

first_imgArchDaily Area:  90 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project 2018 Photographs:  German Cabo Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/890846/yard-house-alberto-facundo-arquitectura Clipboard Year:  Save this picture!© German Cabo+ 17Curated by Danae Santibañez Share “COPY” Projects Houses Spaincenter_img ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/890846/yard-house-alberto-facundo-arquitectura Clipboard Yard House / alberto facundo _arquitecturaSave this projectSaveYard House / alberto facundo _arquitectura CopyAbout this officealberto facundo _arquitecturaOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesLoriguillaSpainPublished on March 26, 2018Cite: “Yard House / alberto facundo _arquitectura” 26 Mar 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StoneShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectDoorsRaynorGarage Door – Advantage SeriesConcreteSika3D Concrete PrintingSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Bre-ClassSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights in Atelier Zimmerlistrasse OfficeWindowsswissFineLineSliding Windows in Villa LakesideSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Smart CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing in Roofs & CanopiesSound BoothsFrameryMeeting Pod – Framery Q – Flip n’ FoldWall / Ceiling LightsAsaf WeinbroomLighting – Linestra 110 BrassMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream CopyHouses•Loriguilla, Spain Architects: alberto facundo _arquitectura Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” Photographs Manufacturers: Ardex, Saint-Gobain, DANOSA, Simer S.A, Spider PlastDirection:EDE3 Gestión de Proyectos, S.L.Constructor:SEOP Construcciones, S.L.Architect In Charge:Alberto Facundo TarazonaCity:LoriguillaCountry:SpainMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© German CaboText description provided by the architects. The yard house born of the place, the reflection and the search of a typological purification. The form is the result of these premises, the creation of two volumes that respond to the simplification of the original home of the village.Is this form, too, that resolves interior ordination. Being the space between the two volumes responsible for lighting, circulation and organization.Save this picture!© German CaboSave this picture!Ground Floor Plan + SectionSave this picture!© German CaboThe program consists of a ground floor of daytime character. The staircase, as a central element, articulates the spaces between the most public areas (kitchen, dining room and living room), the most private (bathroom and study). The first floor night area has two bedrooms with bathrooms.Save this picture!© German CaboWith the initial premise of providing privacy to the house, direct views to the outside are avoided, so the lighting is resolved by longitudinal void flush with the ceiling on the ground floor and on the floor on the first floor, through skylights in superior bathrooms and through the window dining room, focusing the views towards the interior yard.Save this picture!© German CaboProject gallerySee allShow lessDigital Scaling Ruler Works as a Perfect Architect’s ToolArchitecture NewsMilitary Museum: Call for IdeasIdeas Share Yard House / alberto facundo _arquitecturalast_img read more

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Native peoples block toxic oil pipeline

first_imgAug. 23 — The start of construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline, a multi-state, 1,100-mile-long crude oil pipeline to be built under the Missouri, Mississippi and Big Sioux rivers, was temporarily halted on Aug. 18. Led by people from the Oceti Sakowin (Seven Council Fires of the Great Sioux Nation) and other Indigenous nations, protesters forced the U.S. government and the pipeline’s corporate owners to stand down after a series of heroic actions blocked access to the construction site near the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota.Thousands of people representing about 300 Indigenous nations as well as many non-Native people have gathered in solidarity near Standing Rock, and vow to stay there until the pipeline project is cancelled. They stand ready to peacefully defy any court injunction that would allow the pipeline construction to proceed. They will not back down despite arrests, surveillance, police highway blockades, and limited resources.On July 26, the Obama administration, via the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, quietly approved the pipeline, and construction plans by Energy Transfer and Enbridge swiftly moved forward. Standing Rock received a “48-hour notice” that digging was to begin under the Missouri River, a source of water, livelihood and a way of life for Native and non-Native peoples in the region.Months of struggle by Indigenous peoples, farmers, ranchers and environmentalists of many ages and nationalities preceded this important temporary victory. This included “the establishment of the Camp of Sacred Stones in Standing Rock, actions in Iowa, several youth runs for sacred water, including a 2,000 mile trek from North Dakota to Washington D.C., petitions and testifying at hearings with the Army Corps,” outlines Lakota writer Wakíŋyaŋ Waánataŋ (Matt Remle). (lrinspire.com, Aug. 19)‘Historic moment’ unfoldingThe struggle to protect the water and defend tribal sovereignty is mobilizing Indigenous people in the U.S. to a degree not seen in decades. Many say that they are protecting the water for the millions of people in the region who rely on the Missouri River for water. They point out that oil pipelines inevitably leak and break and cause immense environmental devastation as a result.According to the Wall Street Journal, a mouthpiece of the corporate defilers of the Earth, the Dakota Access Pipeline, one of the interrelated Bakken pipelines, has many big-name oil companies connected with it: “Dakota Access is being built by Energy Transfer Partners LP and its affiliate, Sunoco Logistics Partners LP. Phillips 66, the refiner, owns a 25 percent stake. And Enbridge Energy Partners LP and Marathon Petroleum Corp., bought a stake in the Dakota Access line for $2 billion earlier this month, leaving the fate of a separate Bakken pipeline they had been planning unclear.” (Aug. 18)North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple declared a state of emergency Aug. 19, seemingly accusing the protesters of unlawful actions and stating they cause “a significant public safety concern.” Parks were closed and roadblocks were set up to the Cannon Ball Camp in Standing Rock. This may be a prelude to his eventually calling in the National Guard.Dave Archambault II, Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, called the governor’s actions “unfortunate” and decried the fact that the tribe had not been consulted. He said the Tribal Council voted unanimously that the roadblocks should be removed. (lastrealindians.com, Aug. 21)“What is happening at the Cannon Ball Camp reflects a historic moment for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe,” said Archambault. “For the first time in 100 years we are hosting the reconvening of the Seven Council fires of the Oceti Sakowin.”A federal judge will soon decide on a temporary restraining order sought by the corporations to stop or limit protesting. In a separate case, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe will appear on Aug. 24 before a Washington, D.C., federal court seeking a stop to construction of the pipeline. Standing Rock has consistently opposed the pipeline in any form.Statements and resolutions in solidarity with the struggle are requested and pouring in from across the country and around the world. (See “Supporting the Fight Against the Dakota Access Pipeline” at tinyurl.com/z3y8qkv.)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Encampment residents demand end to evictions

first_imgResidents of a tent encampment on W. Chapel Hill Street in Durham, N.C., along with community supporters, held a press conference and rally on June 8 to demand that they not be forcibly evicted by the police.According to a statement from the residents: “Last Friday, on June 1, we received a letter from Captain Reitz notifying us that we would all be evicted within seven days. We have nowhere to go. The shelters are full and all have waiting lists. Many of us do not feel safe staying in a shelter. We feel safe living in our tents and wish to remain here until we find more permanent free housing.” Durham currently faces a huge gentrification and evictions crisis, with more than 900 people getting evicted every month.The tent encampment residents released a statement demanding that the state Department of Transportation and the city of Durham:Do not evict us until we are found permanent, free housing.Do not cut down the trees in our encampment. The trees keep us shaded from the elements, especially the hot sun during the summer, plus they provide us an important environmental buffer from the highway.Provide us with a few trash receptacles and provide us weekly collection service, like all other residencies in Durham, so that we can keep our encampment clean.Transition the old Durham Police headquarters, just across the street from our encampment, into affordable housing and provide us all free housing in the building.“Allow us to be — we just want to live. We are trying to get by best we can and get back into society,” said Sandra McCuller, an encampment resident.“I don’t want to be evicted. I don’t want to live in a shelter and worry about being a victim,” stated resident Edward Prettyman.A statement from the United Residents of the Chapel Hill Street Tent Encampment reads in part: “This is our home. We live here. The state is not using this land. All of us have lived here between four months and a year. We have a trusting, strong community of residents. We all support each other in various ways in feeding ourselves and staying safe. … There is already a housing and eviction crisis in Durham. Do not add us to that tragic list.”Durham activists have set up a rapid response group to mobilize in case the police show up at the encampment at any time, and to keep public pressure and actions going to deter them from evicting the residents. Supporters are urged to contact North Carolina Department of Transportation Secretary James Trogdon at [email protected] and 919-707-2800. Tell him, “Don’t evict the Durham tent encampment!” #DefendDurham #HousingisaRight #stopevictionsnowFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Leading journalist arrested again on charge of libelling Lukashenko

first_img to go further June 22, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Leading journalist arrested again on charge of libelling Lukashenko Receive email alerts BelarusEurope – Central Asia Follow the news on Belarus BelarusEurope – Central Asia Help by sharing this information May 27, 2021 Find out more Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown News “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF sayscenter_img Organisation Reporters Without Borders firmly condemns leading journalist Andrzej Poczobut’s detention since yesterday on a new charge of libelling President Alexander Lukashenko, for which he is facing a possible five-year jail sentence.Poczobut, who works for several independent media including the Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza, was arrested in the western city of Grodno, where he lives. He spent three months in prison last year on a charge of libelling the president.“This new arrest shows that Poczobut is being hounded because of his determination to work as an independent reporter,” Reporters Without Borders said. “He was convicted on a similar charge just a year ago. Because of the president’s ego, he is now threatened with another grotesque conviction. It will just reinforce self-censorship and the climate of intimidation for independentmedia. He must be released without delay.”Poczobut is charged with libel under article 367-2 of the criminal code, which carries a possible five-year jail term when it is a repeat offence and the target is the president.According to the information obtained by Reporters Without Borders, he was arrested at his home at around 4 p.m. yesterday by six men, who included Arseni Nikolski, the investigator who handled the case the last time he was charged. They took him away after searching his apartment and seizing his computers.Poczobut declined to make any statement when interrogated. He is currently being held at Grodno police headquarters, where his lawyer has not been allowed to talk to him.After spending three months in pre-trial detention on a charge of insulting the president for calling him a dictator, Poczobut was given a three-year suspended sentence on 5 July 2011. Yesterday’s arrest was apparently prompted by articles he wrote for two independent news websites, Charter97.org and Belaruspartizan.org, about the April 2011 Minsk metro bombing, for which twoyoung men were executed after a sham trial. News News RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” May 28, 2021 Find out more June 2, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Newslast_img read more

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Tunisia

first_img TunisiaMiddle East – North Africa March 11, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Tunisia November 12, 2019 Find out more News Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” The country is awakening to Internet freedom after being one of the world’s most harshly censored under the rule of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who was overthrown in January. But the national censorship body, nicknamed Ammar 404, has not been completely dismantled. News The role of the social networks in covering “#sidibouzid”The popular uprising sparked by what happened in Sidi Bouzid exploded at a time when news was totally controlled by the regime.The government imposed a blackout on all news of protests there that followed the 17 December 2010 self-immolation of unemployed fruit and vegetable seller Mohamed Bouazizi. Police physically attacked journalists who tried to reach the town or spoke to foreign media outlets. For several days, no news of the revolt came out of the deprived region of the country away from the coastal tourism centres and other economic development.The silence of the mainstream media was broken by social network sites such as Facebook and Twitter and news sites such as Nawaat.org, which were the sources and conveyors of news. The Twitter hashtag #sidibouzid was very popular among users in Tunisia, and then the region and the rest of the world, as international solidarity grew.Facebook especially was a platform for comments, photos and videos, allowing people to keep up with expanding protest movements in Sidi Bouzid, Kasserine and Thala and see for themselves the police repression and violence. For nearly three weeks, amateurs posting photos and camera-phone images provided the only pictures of what was happening in Tunisia.The regime realised the importance of Facebook in early January 2011 and stepped up online censorship, trying to curb distribution of photos of the protests and repression, to hide them from an increasingly interested foreign media.The head of the Agence Tunisienne d’Internet (ATI) said the number of websites blocked by the authorities doubled in just a few weeks. More than 100 Facebook pages about the Sidi Bouzid events were blocked, along with online articles about the unrest in foreign media, including France24, Al-Jazeera, the BBC and Deutsche Welle. Photos and videos could no longer be downloaded on Facebook inside Tunisia. The best-known video and photo sharing sites such as Flickr, YouTube, Dailymotion and Vimeo, had already been blocked for months. Police also hacked into Facebook accounts to steal activists’ passwords and infiltrate networks of citizen-journalists that had grown up around the Sidi Bouzid events. Many e-mailboxes were broken into. Four bloggers were arrested on 6 January.A trial of strength developed between Ammar 404 and the country’s netizens, who had worldwide support. The activist hacker group Anonymous made cyber-attacks (Operation Tunisia) in January on government websites, including those of the president and prime minister, to protest against online censorship. Egyptian Internet-users provided technical ways to get round the censorship and passed on news and demands from inside Tunisia. Tunisia : RSF asks Tunisian president’s office to respect journalists TunisiaMiddle East – North Africa December 26, 2019 Find out more President Ben Ali was forced to flee the country on 14 January after 23 years in power, The revolution was a human one but the online social networks helped make it happen. The information ministry was abolished under the new provisional national unity government announced on 17 January. Well-known blogger Slim Amamou, freed four days earlier, was named secretary of state for youth and sports. The government proclaimed immediate and total freedom of news and expression.End of censorship and surveillance ?The Internet was seen as a threat to the country’s stability and image abroad by the Ben Ali regime, which maintained very strict monitoring and filtering of traffic and hounded opponents. Website addresses and keywords were blocked and filtering was done with Smartfilter and Websense programmes, that also enabled monitoring and interception of e-mail, which was permitted by the 1998 postal law if messages “endangered public order.”The authorities claimed they only blocked terrorist and pornographic sites, but those of political opponents, human rights organisations and independent news agencies were also censored. They included Tunisnews and Nawaat, as well as the sites of the Parti démocrate progressiste (PDPinfo.org) and the Al-Nahda (Renaissance) movement, Tunisonline, Assabilonline, Reporters Without Borders and Al-Jazeera in Arabic. Searches for banned sites produced an “Error 404 – page not found” message, which led to the nickname “Ammar 404” for the state censorship operation.Hacking into dissidents’ Facebook pages was frequent, as well as blocking the sites of specific groups. Other steps against dissidents included cutting off their Internet connection, port blockage, sending viruses and malware to them and infiltrating discussion forums. Censorship was ended by the new government on 14 January, but the Nawaat site told its visitors on 25 January that some sites were still blocked. The ministry of technology and communication had said on 21 January that all sites were freely accessible but partial censorship was being maintained of sites that “offended public decency, through violence or incitement to hatred.” It gave an e-mail address, [email protected], for “the public and civil society groups” to raise matters of online freedom. The situation has since improved and Reporters Without Borders has learned that no sites are now blocked and bloggers and Internet-users are no longer being hounded. The interior ministry has even set up a public relations office and started a Facebook page for Internet-users.But questions remain about the future of the censorship machinery.Need to dismantle censorship apparatusWhile censorship has disappeared, many Internet-users and bloggers have shown concern that the machinery to censor material still exists. The government must openly dismantle it.Those who were involved in censorship have been speaking freely. ATI chief Kamel Saadaoui told Wired magazine he regretted his agency had been seen as an oppressive censor when it had just been following the regime’s orders. Under the new government, the ATI was helping to open up the Internet, he said, and just sticks to maintaining the network. “We have filtering engines but we give access to them to other institutions mandated by the government to choose which sites should be blocked. We don’t even know what sites they are banning because the list is encrypted.”Whatever the past role of the ATI, which many suspected was infiltrated by the secret police, the government still has the means to block websites. Saadaoui promises it will be used only to block sites involving pornography, child pornography, nudity and “hate.” But it would now have to be done with a court order. He said the current filters were necessary but “the limits are symbolic.” But he admitted that “it’s really useless to block. Whatever we do, there are ways to get round it.” Slim Amamou, the blogger now in the government, told Reporters Without Borders on 23 February that the ATI was “drafting suggestions about its future.” He talked about making “an inventory of the online structure” and said he also discussed opening up the Internet service provider market with the technology minister, who agreed with the idea. Currently all telecom operators still have to use ATI as their online gateway. The government reportedly has plans to set up an online censorship committee, but its composition and attitudes are not yet known. Would it just block very specific sites if the source of objectionable content could not be removed and would a court order be required for each blockage? If not, a drift back towards old censorship habits is possible.Freedom of expression is a major victory of Tunisia’s “Jasmin Revolution” but new “red lines” seems to be appearing. Violence by police and troops, corruption by powerful old regime figures still in the country and the transition government’s problems are still covered very little by the media. Such red lines must not give rise to new Internet filters.Tunisia has given an example to everyone who dreams of freedom, by overthrowing a dictator with the help of social network websites. Including Internet access as a basic right in the new national constitution would be greatly welcomed by Tunisians. Other key moves would be to open up the ISP market and dismantle the censorship machinery. Tunisians have won their freedom partly thanks to the Internet and it should now underpin that freedom. center_img Receive email alerts Organisation Follow the news on Tunisia RSF_en Eleven organizations from civil society create the Forum on Information & Democracy, a structural response to information disorder Help by sharing this information News to go further News November 11, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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How Will Sanders’ Legislation Impact Big Banks?

first_imgSubscribe The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago October 3, 2018 959 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News How Will Sanders’ Legislation Impact Big Banks?  Print This Post Home / Daily Dose / How Will Sanders’ Legislation Impact Big Banks? Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. Tagged with: Banks Bill Financial Legislation Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Radhika Ojha Banks Bill Financial Legislation 2018-10-03 Radhika Ojha The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: An Outlook on Single-Family Rental Investments Next: DS News October: The Fight Against Zombie Homes Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago On Wednesday, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) introduced a legislation aimed at breaking up the nation’s biggest banks and risky financial institutions. Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Calif.) will introduce a companion bill in the House for this legislation.According to a statement released by Sanders and Sherman on the legislation, by applying a cap on the size of financial institutions, the bill would break up the six largest banks in the country: JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley. The bill would also address large non-bank financial service companies such as Prudential, MetLife and AIG.“No financial institution should be so large that its failure would cause catastrophic risk to millions of Americans or to our nation’s economic well being,” Sanders said in a statement. “We must end, once and for all, the scheme that is nothing more than a free insurance policy for Wall Street: the policy of ‘too big to fail.’”Under the bill, entities that exceed the 3 percent cap would be given two years to restructure until they are no longer too-big-to-fail. These “Too Big to Exist” institutions would no longer be eligible for a taxpayer bailout from the Federal Reserve and could not use customers’ bank deposits to speculate on derivatives or other risky financial activities.This legislation would force banks such as JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America to shrink their sizes to where they were in 1998, Wells Fargo would shrink to its 2005 size, and Citigroup would shrink to the size it was in the early 1990s.“By breaking up these institutions long before they face a crisis, we ensure a healthy financial system where medium-sized institutions can compete in the free market,” Sherman said.To read the Bill, click here. Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily last_img read more

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Update: Man, 30s, dies in early morning crash in Inishowen

first_img Facebook Renewed calls for full-time Garda in Kilmacrennan Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Update: Man, 30s, dies in early morning crash in Inishowen Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows center_img Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Homepage BannerNews Google+ Twitter By News Highland – February 3, 2020 Community Enhancement Programme open for applications An investigation is continuing into an overnight fatal collision at Three Trees in Quigleys Point. A man was killed in the single vehicle crash which happened in the early hours of this morning.Shortly before 4am, it’s understood that the car – a deep grey Volkswagen Golf – left the road at Three Trees and ended up on the adjoining beach.A man in his 30s – the sole occupant of the car – was pronounced dead at the scene.The main road between Muff and Quigleys Point is to remain closed for much of today to facilitate a technical examination.Diversions are in place and motorists are being advised to use alternative routes with those traveling north advised to travel through Carndonagh.Gardai are particularly keen to hear from anyone who was travelling from Muff to Quigleys point around that time and who may have dash cam footage to come forward.They are also asking who may have witnessed the car in the area prior to the crash to contact them.Anyone with any information is being urged to contact Buncrana Garda Station on (074) 932 0540 Previous articleDonegal Greens call for radical rethink on transportNext articleMore windy weather on the way to Donegal News Highland last_img read more

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The flexible trend

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article What are the drivers for the uptake of flexible benefits? Jane Lewisoutlines the advantages and pitfalls, and sets out a six-point guide to bestpractice  implementationAlthough the take up of flexible benefit programmes is still minimal in theUK – only between 5 and 10 per cent of companies currently have formal schemesin place – there is no denying that the momentum is growing. Evidence suggeststhat between 50 and 60 per cent of British companies are actively looking atoffering a more flexible benefits package to their employees over the next fewyears. The drivers are many and varied. When the first ‘flex’ schemes hit the UK inthe early 1990s, the main demand was from organisations “which just wantedto be different”, says Marcus Underhill, head of flexible benefitsconsulting at Mercer Human Resource Consulting. The strongest uptake was in sectorssuch as IT, telecoms and consultancy, where “the age profile was muchyounger and there were very real pressures of retention”. Offering a ‘personalised proposition’ was a very good way of facilitatingemployee loyalty, he says – and that still remains the case. A tailoredbenefits package can be key to attracting and retaining high performers. Many companies have also found a strong financial incentive for making themove. Although offering flexible benefits is no longer a tax-efficient strategy(the Government removed that NI loop-hole in 1999), it still provides what onesupplier coyly terms “a cost management opportunity”. Underlying thisis the shift between a defined benefit plan (a potentially open-endedarrangement financially) and a defined contribution plan. According to Underhill, the former typically costs an employer some 18 percent of an individual’s salary, while the latter is usually fixed much lower ataround 10 per cent. Thus, providing an allowance per head allows companies to betterpredict and control their benefit costs. The logical consequence of what Richard Stewart, head of Partridge, Muir& Warren’s employee benefits practice describes as “setting a cap inmonetary terms”, is that you need the flexibility to make the most of it. “In today’s low-inflation environment, companies are looking toleverage better value from their benefit spend,” he says. Having flexiblebenefits have also proved a boon to organisations involved in mergers andacquisitions. “When two benefit environments are coming together in oneorganisation, flexible benefits are a good way to achieve ‘benefitharmonisation’ – they can reflect the best of both without increasingcosts.” But the momentum of offering flexible benefits goes far beyond straightforwardcost issues. It is also a cultural movement that taps directly into thestrategic HR preoccupation of building agile, fluid organisations. Flexiblebenefits reflect and enhance “the flexibility of an organisation tochange”, says Underhill. They show a targeted approach, a recognition that”we want to spend the right money on the right people and different peoplewithin an organisation have different needs”. “People are looking for fresh ideas,” says Stewart.”Companies are trying to modernise and refresh their benefits.” It isperhaps no coincidence that the movement towards greater flexibility is takingplace in a climate in which many final salary pension schemes are being woundup. Broadly speaking, there are two kinds of flex solutions on offer. The first,referred to by some practitioners as ‘true flexible benefits’ areemployer-sponsored or paid. The second, dismissed by some as the grotty end ofthe market are ‘voluntary benefits’ in which employees are offered a raft ofdiscounted products or services for which they must stump up themselves. Theseoften take the form of an online shopping portal, with products ranging frominsurance and health plans through to holiday discounts and cut-price CDs. But as Alistair Denton, managing director of Motivano – which offers an eHRplatform consisting of products from more than 140 different suppliers – pointsout, this kind of voluntary solution is tailor-made for companies which, forwhatever reason, are not yet ready for a wholesale move to flex. “Itprovides a kind of half-way house,” he says. Here, Personnel Today offers a best practice guide to choosing andimplementing the right kind of flexible benefits plan for your organisation. 1 Planning and design The first step towards planning a flexible benefits programme starts at astrategic level. You need to ask broad questions: what difference would a movetowards flex have on strategic issues like retention, the shape of theworkforce and an organisation’s ability to remain competitive? How would itencourage certain behaviours and discourage others? Some companies – watercompany United Utilities, for example, which introduced flex this year – claimthe scheme is a “good motivation tool”, promoting decision-makingskills in employees. The key point, says Denton at Motivano, is that “you’ve got tounderstand what you are trying to achieve”. And to do that, you need tocanvas opinion from the top, perhaps by setting up a decision-making workinggroup of senior executives. “You need to analyse the objectives of change,” adds Stewart.”It could be that you just want to improve value, but don’t want a majoroverhaul. At the other end of the spectrum, you might decide you need acompletely new approach.” If you do decide to take the plunge, the next step is to establish the scopeof the scheme by sketching out what Stewart calls “the shape of thesolution”. Try to assess its impact in terms of planning andspecification. Ask how it will operate and what processes will be affected interms of payroll and HR systems. Some clients, Stewart adds, have found theprocess of studying the impact of flex a useful way of taking a fresh look atprocesses and data in their organisations. Two key decisions you need to make at this point are how much to spend oneach employee, and what you will and won’t put into the flexible scheme – inother words, which benefits will remain core. It is important to bear in mind the many “cultural dynamics” thatcould result from this decision, says Underhill. Around half of all flexibleschemes now operating in the UK don’t include pensions for instance, becausethey’re considered too core not to be a defined contribution. Similarly,”if you decide to make holidays flexible, allowing people to swapentitlement for extra pay, for instance, you must consider that sickness ratesmay go up”. The imperative of maintaining a healthy workforce also leadsmany companies to keep medical insurance and healthcare schemes as corebenefits. The issue of how much to spend per employee is so critical, that as a ruleof thumb, Underhill recommends “spending 80 per cent of your time” onthis issue and “just 20 per cent working out what you will include in theflexible benefits package”. Clearly performing a detailed cost analysis atthis stage is crucial – and may yield surprising results. One of Underhill’sclients eventually decided against including holidays on its flex scheme, whenit discovered that such a move would expose it to a £3m additional cost. Manyof the firm’s employees, who had fallen into the habit of not taking their fullholiday entitlement, had not been claiming payment in lieu. Organisations which have embraced the flex approach have taken manydifferent routes towards calculating the size of an individual’s flexibleallowance. At online grocer Ocado, for instance, each employee gets 500 points– about £500 – to spend on benefits in the Pick Your Own range in addition tocore benefits. Nonetheless, says Underhill, many companies find “the cleanestway” is to calculate an individual’s allowance as a percentage of theirsalary. Lloyds TSB, which next month launches a flexible benefits package forits 70,000 staff, plans to introduce an allowance of 4 per cent of basicsalary, which staff can either take as cash or spend on flexible benefits. Theycan also use up to 50 per cent of their salary topping up their benefits. In common with many organisations, Lloyds TSB has divided its flexiblebenefits into three categories: ‘health and wellbeing’ (allowing staff to buyprivate medical insurance, screening and dental cover); ‘leisure and lifestyle’(including the chance to buy or sell five days holiday and options on childcareand retail vouchers); and ‘protecting your future’ (allowing staff to increasetheir core contributions on pension and life assurance as well as adding newoptions such as personal accident and critical illness). To enable it to shape its package, Lloyds ran a series of employee focusgroups and a phone survey. Getting employee input at this stage is crucial toestablishing a viable flexible package that will actually be used, say theexperts. “It is important to canvas widely,” warns Paul Watson,managing director of online benefits provider 4th Contact. “Take across-section of staff, ask what they like about existing packages and whatthey might like to see in a flexible package. Get some feel for what motivatesemployees and for what is possible.” It may well be that some requests are impossible to meet, says Underhill.But while you should obviously consider them all, if you do reject suggestionshe urges companies to give good feedback on why they were not taken up. And, asDenton at Motivano points out, even if the budget is not in place to includeall suggestions, companies can improve the “width and depth” of theiroffering by considering adding some benefits on a voluntary basis. 2 Choosing the right partner The success or otherwise of any company’s flexible benefit scheme depends toa large extent on the choice of provider, and the list of options is growingrapidly. At the top end of the corporate market, the ‘traditional’ benefitsconsultants – Towers Perrin, Mercer and Watson Wyatt, for example – have beenjoined by representatives from the Big Five accountancy companies. Themid-range market is also well serviced by middle-tier benefits consultants –Partridge Muir & Warren, for example. At the lower end of the scale aretraditional insurance brokers and around 8,500 independent financial advisersand a new breed of supplier offering an ASP solution, such as Motivano.Finally, there is still room in the market for specialist niche providers.Manchester-based HealthSure, which majors on healthcare cash plans, is a casein point. Progress in technology has had a big impact on the profile of benefits managers.As Underhill points out, four years ago only 20 per cent of companies lookingat flexible benefits planned to combine them with e-solutions. That figure nowstands at 75-80 per cent. So the door has been opened to a host of newentrants, from the big eHR outsourcers to a host of smaller software providers.Deciding which partner to go for will clearly depend on individual companycircumstances, the extent of flexibility planned, and existing technologicalinfrastructure and IT systems. If your budget is tight, but you wish to extendchoice, you may consider going down the voluntary ASP route. And if you areplanning a wholescale move to eHR anyway, it may make sense to include flexiblebenefits provision in that deal. While the robust systems are clearly critical to the success of any flexiblebenefit scheme, however, it is a mistake to place too much emphasis on thetechnology, says Stewart at Partridge, Muir & Warren. “The issue isnot about technology, it is about humans using systems,” he says. But incommon with most other ‘traditional’ benefits consultants, the firm hasinvested heavily in technology of its own, which can be tailored to suit theneeds of individual companies. “We’ve built flexible benefits into oursystem from the ground up.” 3 Contract arrangements There are two kinds of contracts you will need to consider: those pertainingto external flexible benefits providers, and those to employees. In both cases,says Motivano’s Denton, “if you’ve done the planning right, contractarrangements tend to fall into place”. Key issues to build into contractual arrangements with suppliers are servicelevel agreements and rollout schedules. You need to ask whether a supplier”has the ability to deliver what you want tomorrow”, says Mercer’sUnderhill, and build that into the contract. Similarly it is important toclarify who will have responsibility for control of the project and who isultimately responsible for communicating it. When considering individual benefits, it is critical you read the smallprint of policies and clarify exactly what a benefit entitles an individual toreceive, says Raman Sankaran, marketing communications manager at HealthSure.You cannot count on an employee doing this for his or herself. “A poorbenefit is going to reflect very badly psychologically on the employer,”he says. Conversely, a well-run, useful benefit will reinforce “positivepsychological links” with the employer. As far as staff contracts go, the essence of flexibility is, of course, justthat, says Sankaran. Since employees should have the power to review and changetheir choices on an annual basis “it is very important they are runcontractually on an annual basis.” It is also important “to be very clear how an individual’s employmentcontract has been amended by flex,” says Underhill. “You don’t wantany type of claim or issues with the Inland Revenue. It is a good idea to checkyour scheme, and details of individual contracts, with the Revenue beforeembarking upon it.” 4 Communication to employees “Your benefits are only as good as how far you can communicatethem,” says Sankaran at HealthSure. Indeed, poor communication is theprincipal reason why so many new benefits schemes, launched amid much fanfare,ultimately wither on the vine. A surprising number of companies do not communicate any benefits informationto employees beyond the traditional employee handbook provided on day one.Consequently, many staff fail to have a realistic idea of benefits costs andwho pays for them. Any communication policy you plan should ensure that employees understandthe basic mechanics of the benefits plan, how it operates and the company’sposition on cost management. In essence it should answer four basic questions,says Underhill: What am I being offered? How does this differ from what I wasoffered before? How can I decide what is right for me and can I make thatchoice and do that transaction? While some employers, such as Lloyds, reported an enthusiastic reception toits flexible benefits plan among staff, not every company can count on this.Indeed, staff resistance may offer a significant barrier. Very often there is aperception that with flexible benefits, companies are giving with one hand andtaking away with another. It’s important to tackle this value question head on, says Underhill. If itis clear to employees that the total sum the company is paying in benefits isactually going down, don’t deny it. Talk up the benefits of a flexible plan atthe same time – Ocado advertised its scheme to employees as ‘a framework tofreedom’. “Transparency is always better,” says Underhill. “If youavoid the subject [altogether] all you are doing is deferring the pain. In thecurrent environment, most employees are receptive to bad news, provided theyunderstand its cause.” In unionised workplaces, changes should benegotiated with unions before they are introduced to non-union staff. Most experts agree that a prolonged, multi-pronged campaign of communicationis the best approach. By receiving employee feedback during the planning phase,you will have set the ball rolling. You need to hammer home the message of whatthe scheme will include, when it starts and how staff can go about takingadvice and enrolling. The means of communication will depend on individual circumstances. Ashopfloor worker, without PC access, for example, will be generally in the darkif you concentrate on an intranet campaign. Other options to consider includeposters, mailing information with pay-slips, individual briefings and seminars.Closer to the scheme’s enrolment deadline, you must consider providingaccess to independent financial advisors, helpdesks or helplines to providemore detailed, individual advice. Some companies have successfully put their schemes on the map by brandingthem separately. Brewery and pub chain Greene King, for example, has brandedits new system Signature, while pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca has called itsnew scheme AZ Advantage. 5 EnrolmentThe introduction of any new policy is always bedevilled by what Underhillcalls “the twin dangers of apathy and cynicism”. To counter this, itis important you set a deadline for enrolment and increase the communicationcampaign as that deadline approaches. In most companies enrolment periodstypically stretch from two to six weeks. Some organisations have successfully boosted enrolment by giving employeeswhat one expert calls “a form of consideration” in exchange for theiracceptance to the change in their employment contract – this might be by way ofa one-off payment equivalent to their first-year costs of switching to the newplan. But whichever sweetener you choose, it is likely to have an importantpsychological impact. By accepting the payment, they have tacitly accepted thenew plan as part of their employment contract. A further tactic is to call upon the services of employee champions, trainedin the new scheme and prepared to talk up its advantages. Another option is toinclude an enticement. At market research company Millward Brown, for example, it found thatincluding flexibility over holidays helped push take up of other onlineflexible benefits to 90 per cent. It is important to monitor the process of enrolment on a daily basis, saysDenton at Motivano. “Check who has enrolled and who hasn’t and report thisback to the management at regular intervals.” Keep up the campaign”so that you’re not just dumping everything at the last moment”. Undoubtedly the process of enrolment is considerably easier amongorganisations which have already majored on self-service HR. Filling in anonline form, or accessing advice, is a great deal easier than dealing withpaper-based equivalents. 6 ReviewIn the short term, the review should be “a process ofreconciliation”, says Denton, “making sure all the numbersadd-up”. After that, you need a more generic review. In broad terms thismeans assessing what’s popular and what has missed the mark. “Get out toemployees and ask what they would like in the future”. Reviewing the impact of flex from a strategic point of view is equallycritical. Question to what extent flex has met the organisation’s originalaims. Have costs been cut? Has retention been improved? Are employees moremotivated to stand on their own feet? However much you have championed the scheme, it is important to take a long,hard look at its objective success. Recognise any failings and take steps tochange them – even if this means going through the upheaval of changingsuppliers. Give the scheme time to settle, however, before you go about making anyreally drastic changes. It may take a year or so for the good news about aparticular benefit to percolate through the organisation. There’s nothing quitelike seeing a colleague enjoying the tangible benefits of a well-plannedflexible benefit scheme, to galvanise apathetic individuals into taking actionon their own account. Some popular areas of benefit provision– Accidental death and disabilityinsurance– Critical illness insurance– Disability insurance for employee– Disability insurance for spouse/family– Life insurance for employee– Life insurance for spouse/family– Private medical insurance– Hospital cash plan– Pet insurance– Travel insurance– Dental insurance– Health/sports club membership– Season ticket loans– Cars– House/car insurance– Long-term care– Group discounts– Legal services– Personal contract car purchase– Pensions (including stakeholder)– Stakeholder pensions only– Computer leasing– Concierge services (eg dry cleaning)– Childcare vouchers– Holidays– Holiday/entertainment discounts– Financial counselling– Personal loans, banking and investment facilities– Equity incentives– Health screening– Training and development– Optical discounts The flexible trendOn 24 Sep 2002 in Auto-enrolment, Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Assistant Professor of Communication

first_imgJob SummaryThe Department of Communication at Columbus State University inColumbus, Georgia seeks applicants for a full-time, tenure-trackAssistant Professor of Communication whose assignment will beteaching production courses in integrated media and documentarybeginning in August 2021.ResponsibilitiesThis position is expected to teach courses that support ourcurriculum, including but not limited to: digital media production(including pre and post production), documentary production, socialmedia and audience analytics, and media writing. Specialconsideration is given to candidates whose production skill setsinclude creative services, advertising campaigns, and/or digitaland mobile advertising experience. The successful candidate willmaintain a 4:4 teaching load each semester. Summer teaching isoften available. An active program of research and/or creativeprojects is expected for tenure. In addition, the successfulcandidate will be responsible for supporting our recruitingefforts, our student organizations, and support our Non-Profit andCivic Engagement Center which seeks to create engagement andportfolio-building opportunities forcurrent students and with community clients.Required QualificationsRequired qualifications include a PhD or MFA completed prior toAugust 2021. Demonstrated professional production experience andstrategic use of social and digital media is expected.Required Documents to Attach Contact InformationIf you have any questions, please contact Dr. Bruce Getz,Department of Communication, Columbus State University, 4225University Avenue, Columbus, GA 31907. E-mail may be directed [email protected] of EmploymentA successful criminal background check will be required as acondition of employment.Please Note: Visa sponsorship is not provided for thisposition.Special Applicant InstructionsReview of applications will begin March 2021 and will continueuntil the position has been filled. Applications for part-time andfull-time faculty positions must include transcripts of allacademic work, and official transcripts must be presented prior tocampus visit if selected for interview. Applicants must have theability to meet Southern Association of Colleges and SchoolsCommission on Colleges (SACSCOC) requirements, in particular aminimum of 18 graduate hours in the teaching discipline. ColumbusState University is an Affirmative Action/Equal OpportunityEmployer, Committed to Diversity in Hiring.All applications and required documents must be submitted usingColumbus State University’s online employment site and a completepacket must be submitted for full consideration. If applicable, anyinternational transcripts must be evaluated by an approved foreigncredential evaluator prior to submission. Cover Letter/Letter of ApplicationCurriculum VitaeUnofficial Transcripts (Official transcripts from allinstitutions attended must be received prior to an offer beingextended)Link to Demo ReelSample of Scholarly/Creative workCurrent contact information (emails and telephone numbers) forthree (3) professional references willing to provide recommendationletters.last_img read more

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Sunday Sales Bill Passes House Committee

first_imgOlivia Covington for www.theiindianalawyer.comAn amended version of Sunday alcohol sales legislation in Indiana would allow Hoosiers to purchase alcohol for carryout on Sundays as soon as the bill is signed, rather than waiting until the traditional legislative effective date of July.The House Public Policy Committee passed the amended version of Senate Bill 1 with a 9-1 vote on Wednesday, with chairman Ben Smaltz, R-Auburn, telling committee members there did not seem to be a reason to delay the implementation of Sunday sales.“If we’re going to allow the people of Indiana to buy carryout on Sunday, then why are we waiting?” Smaltz said. “What infrastructure needs to go in place?”The bill, authored in the Senate by Lafayette Republican Ron Alting, would allow grocery, convenience, drug and liquor stores to sell alcohol for carrying out from noon to 8 p.m. on Sundays, ending a Prohibition-era ban on Sunday sales in the Hoosier state. The full Senate passed the historic legislation last month, while identical legislation in House Bill 1051 passed the House.Grant Monahan and Travis Scheidt – representing the Indiana Retail Council and Indiana Association of Beverage Retailers, respectively – each testified in favor of the amended version of SB1 on Wednesday, a recent compromise that ended a longstanding feud between grocery and liquor stores, but spelled defeat for legislation expanding the sale of cold beer beyond liquor stores.Only Lisa Hutcheson with the Indiana Coalition to Reduce Underage drinking spoke in opposition to SB 1, expressing concern that the provisions of HB 1419, if passed, would not take effect until 2019 or 2020. That bill would codify certain safeguards related to the sale of alcoholic beverages, such as a requirement for all clerks to be at least 21 years old and to undergo training before selling alcohol.“Public health and prevention appear to be an afterthought,” Hutcheson said. “…Why are those safeguards going into effect one or two years later?”Rep. Tim Wesco, R-Osceola, was the only vote against SB 1 on Wednesday. It now moves to the full House of Representatives.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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