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Probing how colleges benefited from slavery

first_img Related Ta-Nehisi Coates, a journalist for The Atlantic whose book “Between the World and Me,” a searing 152-page letter to his son about being black in America, won a National Book Award in 2015, delivered the day’s keynote address. The author referred to slavery as “big business,” so big, in fact, that he finds it “impossible to imagine the United States of America without it.”“We talk about enslavement as though it were a bump in the road,” said Coates, “and I tell people it’s the road, it’s the actual road.”Coates offered up suggestions for institutions eager to dig into their pasts and confront their ties to slavery. First, he cautioned them not to “limit the study of enslavement to enslaved peoples.” What Coates calls the “plunder of enslavement” did not end with enslavement, he said, but extended through segregation, and its effects continue to be felt in the country’s current deep inequality.He suggested that reparations should be a key part of solutions moving forward, and he added that university leaders need to encourage other institutions and other leaders across the country to “do this type of research and to try to think about what they owe.”“When you stand on the backs of other people who have been exploited,” he said, “any sort of moral institution that wants to teach young people about morality and ethics has to do the right thing and try to make some amends for that.”Language, in particular the way slavery is framed, also needs to be an important part of the discussions, said Coates. Slavery wasn’t about one group of people simply being rude to another, he noted. It was a highly organized, structured system.Listening will also be key. Anger will be an inevitable part of any dialogue, said Coates, who urged his listeners not to “retreat into yourselves.”Ta-Nehisi Coates offered a number of suggestions for institutions seeking to confront their ties to slavery. Coates and President Drew Faust were two of several speakers at the conference. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerLater, Coates and Faust, a historian of the Civil War and the American South who is also Harvard’s Lincoln Professor of History, discussed issues of slavery and reparations on stage.The barrier to reparations isn’t the inability to come up with some kind of workable payment system, Coates told Faust. “The barrier is that people don’t want to pay and they don’t think they should have to,” he said.To end their talk, Faust asked Coates if he was optimistic about the ability of universities and the nation to come to terms with the past.The question of optimism or pessimism “is almost beside the point,” said Coates. “It is what it is, and people need to act . . . we have a moral responsibility to act, to do, to think.”The day of deep discussions built on other work about Harvard in recent years. In 2007, Laird Bell Professor of History Sven Beckert partnered with other Harvard faculty and students to develop the Harvard and Slavery initiative to investigate the University’s slavery ties. Based on some of the findings, Faust last year ordered a plaque affixed to Wadsworth House to commemorate the lives and contributions of four enslaved women and men who worked there during the presidencies of Benjamin Wadsworth and Edward Holyoke in the 1700s. She also convened a faculty panel to organize Friday’s symposium, a group led by Beckert; Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, the Victor S. Thomas Professor of History and of African and African American Studies; and Daniel Carpenter, director of the social sciences program at Radcliffe and the Allie S. Freed Professor of Government.Faust recently announced plans to fund a researcher who will be “charged with discovering the history of slavery at Harvard.”As part of the discovery and education effort, the Harvard Archives opened an exhibit on Thursday featuring much of the material uncovered in recent years relating to the University’s slavery ties. Harvard also just launched a website on the topic.Friday’s panels included a session on slavery and universities that featured speakers from Georgetown, Stanford, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In September, Georgetown announced it would atone for its own past, including the sale of 272 slaves in 1838 to help pay off the institution’s debts. Georgetown pledged to offer preferential admissions to the descendants of those enslaved people, to erect a memorial to them, and to create an institute to study slavery.Ivy League efforts to shine light into the slaveholding past largely began at Brown University in 2003, when President Ruth Simmons appointed a committee to investigate the school’s ties to slavery. In 2007, the committee reported back that the early institution had significantly benefited from the trans-Atlantic slave trade.James T. Campbell, a history professor at Stanford who chaired the Brown committee, said that Simmons “had the courage to debate even the most painful issues,” and that her efforts helped to ignite similar investigations.Georgetown history professor Adam Rothman said that while his school’s history wasn’t a secret, it was also “not widely known,” and he called the missed opportunity to reach the wider public with that story a “failure of scholarship.” He urged academics to “make it known … and remind us of this history in new ways.”Citing recent student demonstrations around the country protesting how some campus buildings are named after slaveholders, Craig Steven Wilder, a professor of history at MIT, urged faculty, administrators, and trustees “to confront that past” themselves. “It’s time for us to support the students in the most direct way that we can, which is by actually living up to the values that we define ourselves by.”In a discussion exploring Harvard’s direct ties to slavery, Beckert said that his initial 2007 seminar on the topic was inspired by Simmons’ efforts at Brown and by his own upbringing in Germany, which taught him how “almost anywhere some dark history lurks.”That history at Harvard, explored by his students, was not only part of the school’s past, it was part of the nation as a whole, said Beckert, and was present in the slaveholding South as well as in “the merchant houses of Boston, the banks of New York, the factories in Rhode Island, and the universities throughout New England.”“Slavery is our present,” Beckert continued, and it must be confronted and acknowledged with “economic and political consequences. It cannot be purely symbolic or rhetorical.”An afternoon discussion touched on the recent controversy surrounding Harvard Law School’s shield. Last March, the University retired the shield, which was modeled on the family crest of Isaac Royall Jr., an 18th-century slaveholder whose bequest endowed the first professorship of law at Harvard. History scholar Daniel R. Coquillette, who recently helped to publish a book on the first century of HLS, said his research brought him to Royall and also to Antigua, the West Indian island that was the home of his lucrative sugar plantation. “As we got into” the research, he said, “it got worse.”Coquillette, the Charles Warren Visiting Professor at HLS, said that the School was founded on money earned by the labor of Royall’s slaves. During his research, he also learned how Royall helped to brutally repress a slave revolt on Antigua. “We must not forget that Harvard Law School is linked with slavery,” said Coquillette, and that it owes a debt to the people of Antigua. Part of Harvard’s greatness, he added, is in its ability to “recognize in itself the truth, veritas.”His comment was in part a reference to Professor Annette Gordon-Reed’s written response to the shield controversy, what he called “one of the most eloquent pieces of writing I’ve ever seen.” Gordon-Reed, author of groundbreaking work on the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and his slave Sally Hemmings, penned a passionate argument in favor of maintaining the former HLS shield. Doing so, she wrote, “and tying it to a historically sound interpretive narrative … would be the most honest and forthright way” to honor the memory of the people enslaved by Royall.Gordon-Reed, the Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at HLS, the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at Radcliffe, and a professor of history, returned to that argument on Friday and explained how she had hoped the School might reconstitute the shield during its centennial with a ceremony that linked the three bushels of wheat on it to the lives of the enslaved people whose labor harvested that crop.“They would be remembered in a way that would be living and go forward … and we could make the story what we wanted it to be, rather than being hostage to Isaac Royall and his family.”The day’s final panel explored links between slavery and universities globally and included speakers from the University of the West Indies and the University of Cape Town, as well as the former justice minister of France. In a discussion prior to a major conference, Faust amplifies the expanding effort to document a painful part of the University’s past Understanding Harvard’s ties to slavery Hundreds of listeners from Harvard and beyond packed a Radcliffe auditorium on Friday for a series of wrenching discussions about the historical role of universities in the propagation of slavery.After calling on Harvard last year to investigate further its ties to slavery, President Drew Faust convened a faculty committee to develop the conference, called “Universities and Slavery: Bound by History,” which was sponsored by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.The day of discussions, remarks, and poetry readings at the Knafel Center featured academicians, scholars, and administrators who explored how Harvard and other universities have been coming to terms with their pasts. Harvard was complicit in slavery from the 17th century until the practice ended in Massachusetts in 1783, said Faust, and the University maintained financial and other ties to the slave-holding South through Emancipation during the Civil War.“This history and its legacy have shaped our institution in ways we have yet to fully understand,” said Faust. “Today’s conference is intended to help us explore parts of the past that have remained all but invisible. To acknowledge those realities is essential if we are to undermine the legacies of race and slavery that continue to divide our nation, and if we are to commit ourselves to building a better future.”last_img read more

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USC student selected for national dentistry board

first_imgThe president of the American Dental Hygiene Association has handpicked a USC senior, along with three other students from the nation, to serve on the ADHA student advisory board.Smile wide · Senior Joan Beleno was selected by the president of the American Dental Hygiene Association to serve on the advisory board. – Photo courtesy of USC NewsJoan Beleno, a senior majoring in dental hygiene at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, was selected because of her leadership skills and passion for ensuring patient health, said Diane Melrose, chair of the dental hygiene program at USC.“Joan works very hard, is genuine, honest and an amazing person,” Melrose said. “Her overall character and great communication skills with individuals make her a great leader. She really wants to see our profession excel and has a real dedication to having our profession be the best.”ADHA serves as a professional organization and the governing body for American dental hygienists, aimed at maintaining the livelihood of the profession.Students are able to use ADHA as a connection to what is going on in the field of dentistry, what they need to know about the profession and what they need to do after graduating, Beleno said.“The student advisory board is a group of four people from the whole nation who are the eyes and ears for the ADHA’s Committee on Student Relations,” Beleno said. “We are who the Student Relations Committee goes to and asks about student interests and concerns — we are the middlemen between the current students and ADHA.”Beleno said she is happy to be on the ADHA board because she is able to represent USC.“I’m really honored because I know that it is not every day that someone is able to work on the board,” Beleno said. “Being on the student advisory board also helps people know that USC has a great dentistry program and I’m looking forward to seeing the background of our profession and bringing different insights to USC.”Beleno graduated from UC Irvine with a Bachelor of Arts in applied ecology before USC. She decided to go to USC because of the strength of the program at the School of Dentistry.“I have always been on the dental track and dental hygiene has a lot to offer, with relationships with patients as well as working in the healthcare field,” Beleno said. “After being appointed a month ago, I’m excited to get everything situated, and hopefully this will encourage others to get involved in their legislation and with student programs so that they are aware with everything that is going on with dental hygiene.”Members of the board meet for monthly or bimonthly conference calls to discuss upcoming issues and concerns.Each year,  a national conference is held and the student advisory board is responsible for helping to plan the student portion of the national conference. The board also gathers guest speakers and conducts student activities.Along with serving on the student advisory board, Beleno is president of the Student American Dental Hygiene Association at USC.This year, Beleno participated in a table clinic/research poster session and presented at the National Dental Hygiene conference in Las Vegas. She also actively engages in community service and volunteers at AYUDA Dental Clinic offering dental treatment to children.In the future, Beleno hopes to work in the L.A. area as a dental hygienist.last_img read more

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Leaf sniper Gavin Currie makes his own history

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr,The Nelson Daily SportsMove over Mike Laughton.Take a seat Frank Carlson.Why don’t you just sit right down and relax Bill McDonnell.On the weekend Nelson fans celebrate 75 years of history in the Civic Centre Arena — history that includes more than just hockey events — there’s a new kid on the block making a name for himself across the parking lot from the Grand Old Barn.Gavin Currie is quickly becoming a household name to hockey fans in Nelson, much like Laughton, Carlson and McDonnell were during their playing days.“Everyone has been so nice to me. People who I’ve stayed with have welcomed me into their homes . . . . Nelson is kind of my second home away from home,” the Leaf scoring star recently told The Nelson Daily.Fans with any knowledge of the Leafs know quite well the value of the Abbotsford native.
 Currie, 20, leads the Leafs in scoring with 33 points. He’s coming off a six-point weekend and has accumulated 15 points in the past eight games.However, getting Currie to the Heritage City was the sole mission of former Leaf coach and GM, Simon Wheeldon. And if the Leafs manage to find success this season, current skipper Chris Shaw should send a bottle of the best bubbly the way of the former main man.“Simon wrote me a letter after the (2008) Westside training camp to ask if I wanted to come to play for Nelson,” Currie explained. “I had a few other offers, but those teams were just sending me pamphlets and Simon really took an interest in me.”“He kept phoning me and phoning me and I finally I told him I’d give it a try and this is the best decision I’ve ever made,” Currie added. Currie has been one of the better Leaf players. Retract that statement. With all due respect to the Connor McLaughlin, Tyler Parfeniuk and Taylor O’Neil, the 6’1”, 175-pound forward is the best player on the roster all season long.“Gavin is a player in this league that probably shouldn’t be in this league but has found a home here in Nelson and really loves it,” Shaw said when asked about the team’s leading scorer. “He’s kind of a quiet leader in the dressing room and keeps the guys lighthearted. “But to have a player like that, a two-way player that’s so dynamic offensively, and pretty responsible defensively, it’s definitely a plus.”Despite finding his second home in Nelson, for a brief time after accepting Wheeldon’s offer Currie became a little scared as to where he was heading. So out came the B.C. road map of B.C. calm his nerves. “I never knew about Nelson. . .. I really never knew Nelson existed,” admitted Currie, adding fuel to frustrations of Interior folk that Lower Mainlanders don’t figure there is anything worth any value after Hope. “I thought (Nelson) was really Fort Nelson where it snowed and was minus-50 every day,” he added with a smile.But after landing in Kootenay Country Currie adapted quickly to Wheeldon’s four-line rotation. Playing in 39 games during his first season, Currie scored 13 goals while adding 16 assists for 29 points.That season was capped off with the KIJHL Championship. The success prompted Currie to seek out a spot in the B.C. Hockey League.However, the joys of playing in Junior B were quickly dashed at the Junior A level. The bad taste forced Currie to ask Wheeldon if there was a spot still on the Leafs.“Going to play BCHL last year as a 19-year-old I felt I wasn’t going to get that opportunity of being on a first or second line . . . realized all I would play is third or fourth line,” Currie said. “I never really wanted to tryout because after three previous years of being shutdown by teams and coaches and some never even calling me back, I’ve always come back here an never had a negative thought. “So looking at all the positives here, and never seeing one positive in the BCHL, I really wanted to stay here and I’m really glad with my decision.”Of course that decision was a little second-guessed by Currie when the Leafs jumped out to a, wait for it, a 0-4 start. The results didn’t get any better during the month of September for the younger, inexperienced Leafs. Nelson finished the month at 3-6, including a loss to bottom-feeding Grand Forks.However, since September Nelson has been gliding along at an 11-5 clip to climb to within two points of third-place Spokane Braves and eight behind Murdoch-leading Castlegar Rebels.A team the Leafs will be eager to knock down a few notches, Saturday in the old stomping grounds of Laughton, Carlson and McDonnell as the franchise helps Nelson celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Civic Centre.“Right now we’re finally starting to play like a team so hopefully everything will start to fall into place . . . which I sure it will,” said Currie.Who is looking to create his own history — history that surely will be talked about when Nelson celebrates 75 years in the current NDCC [email protected]last_img read more

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SA retailer opens in Angola

first_imgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material South Africa’s biggest single brand store network, PEP, is extending its southern African store footprint into Angola and making a major investment in Africa’s fastest-growing country. In addition to the Lobito store, PEP plans to open more stores in Namibe, Benguela, Sumbe and Lubango within the next year. With the launch of its first store in Angola, PEP now operates in 11 southern African countries. PEP Africa has been operating for 10 years and has 38 stores in Zambia, 22 in Malawi and 30 in Mozambique. Distribution centre SAinfo reporter “According to our research, affordable clothing and products are the most important factors for Angolan customers.” “We chose Benguela as the location for our DC as this is central to our store expansion programme and essential to our logistical needs,” said Jacobs.center_img “We believe that our product offering of value for money and functionality is right for the Angolan market,” PEP Africa GM Willie Jacobs said in a statement at the end of October. The balance of PEP’s 1 310 stores are in South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. 7 November 2008 As part of its commitment to and investment in this new market, PEP has opened a 2 000 square metre dedicated distribution centre. Following extensive research in Angola over the last two years, PEP Africa was confident of its growth and success in the new market, with its first store opening in Lobito, central Angola, on 31 October. According to PEP, new Angola GM Gerrie Scheepers is fluent in Portuguese, and brings extensive and relevant experience, having been GM of PEP’s successful Mozambique operation for the past five years.last_img read more

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FD Early Intervention Webinar: Promoting Positive Relationships

first_imgSocial Emotional Development in the Early Years: Promoting Positive RelationshipsDate:  August. 6, 2015Time:  11:00 am – 12:30 pm EasternLocation: Social Emotional Development in the Early Years: Promoting Positive RelationshipsCreative Commons Licensing {Flickr, Untitled, July 5, 2014]Amy Santos, PhD, and Kimberly Hile, EdM, will discuss the importance of social emotional development and lifelong outcomes for young children with disabilities. Santos and Hile will discus specific topics including:  1) Research evidence that highlights the importance of healthy and positive relationships between children and their parents and/or caregivers, 2) Cultural, ethnic, racial, and linguistic variations on parent-child interactions and expectations, 3) Considerations for military families (e.g., absence due to deployments, reunification, parenting from afar, etc.), 4) The importance of Family-Centered Practices, 5) Typical relationship struggles between parents/caregivers and children with disabilities, and 6) Parent coaching strategies to support parents and caregivers as they develop healthy and positive relationships with their children.MFLN FD Early Intervention webinars offer CE Credits through the Early Intervention Training Program (EITP) at the University of Illinois. To find out further information, click here. The EI team is actively pursuing more CE opportunities in states other than Illinois. Please check back frequently to the webinar Learn Event web page to receive updates on our progress. Access to the webinar Learn Event page can be found here.For more information on future presentations in the 2015 Family Development webinar series, please visit our professional development website or connect with us via social media for announcements: Facebook & Twitter.last_img read more

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Lewis Hamilton takes pole for Azerbaijan Grand Prix in Mercedes 1-2

first_imgLewis Hamilton took a brilliant pole position for the Azerbaijan Grand Prix ahead of Valtteri Bottas on Saturday, with Mercedes securing a convincing 1-2 as rivals Ferrari lagged behind.Bottas led qualifying and then set an even quicker time on his final lap – only for Hamilton to beat him by nearly half a second.The British driver’s 66th pole moves him one ahead of F1 great Ayrton Senna and just two behind Michael Schumacher’s all-time record of 68.Raikkonen qualified third ahead of his Ferrari teammate Sebastian Vettel, the championship leader.After three difficult practice sessions, qualifying also proved tough.With three minutes remaining a red flag came up, halting the session, after Daniel Ricciardo clipped the wall with the left side of his Red Bull coming out of Turn 6 – prompting an expletive from the Australian driver.last_img read more

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Modi lashes out at disruptive Cong hails Mulayam

first_imgAddressing public rallies in Rishikesh (Uttarakhand), Saharanpur (UP) and at a function in Chandigarh, Modi said he had decided to share his feelings before the public because ‘Jan Sabha’ (public assembly) is above the Lok Sabha where the government’s voice was being “throttled” despite being given a massive mandate by the people. Hitting out at the Congress over repeated deadlock in Parliament, Modi said 40 MPs were “conspiring” to hamper the country’s development against the wishes of 400 MPs which was an “insult” to democracy. Also Read – Punjab on alert after release of excess water from Bhakra dam“Beyond the Lok Sabha is ‘Jan Sabha’ and that is why I am expressing my views here. Some people (opposition) are doing this just for their arrogance. There can be nothing more unfortunate than this. The people will not forgive these parties for their conduct in Parliament,” he said.  In the same vein, he appreciated Samajwadi Party leader and Uttar Pradesh strongman Mulayam Singh Yadav for making attempts to break the logjam in Parliament during the Monsoon session, which was washed out. “He (Mulayam Singh) may be our political rival but he does not practice negative politics,” said Modi, while launching a blistering attack on the Congress saying, “Opposing the government’s policies and dissenting with it is okay but doing negative politics is not good for democracy. The Congress must understand the difference between the two and learn to respect people’s verdict.” Also Read – Union Min doubts ‘vote count’ in Bareilly, seeks probe“40 MPs are conspiring to block development of the country against the wishes of the 400 MPs. Time has come to spread awareness about democracy in the country and for the people to pressurise their representatives to do their work in Parliament by asking questions and debating issues and letting the Houses function,” he said.Noting that the region sends large number of people to the armed forces, Modi said his government delivered on its promise of implementing “One Rank, One Pension (OROP).” He said his government tried to honour the soldiers by fulfilling their demand for One Rank, One Pension. The Prime Minister said no previous government paid adequate attention to the enormity of the exercise and attacked the previous UPA dispensation, saying if it had thought about it then it would not have allotted only Rs 500 crore. The armed forces veterans should thank the poor people of the country for implementing OROP which entails a whopping Rs 10,000 crore expenditure per annum, he said. He said, “We also thought that perhaps the expenditure on OROP will be a bit more than Rs 500 crore.”last_img read more

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