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How to keep your perspective on the market

first_img continue reading » Basics of the marketCreated in 1792 on Wall Street, the first major U.S. stock exchange was the New York Stock & Exchange Board (now known as the New York Stock Exchange). A stock market is a system where shares of publicly traded companies are issued – and millions of different investors, or shareholders, buy and sell them. The money raised can help grow these businesses. And investors/shareholders can participate in it. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulates and oversees the U.S. stock markets.1For some, following the stock market can seem daunting — but it doesn’t need to be.Here are five tips on how to gain perspective, keep your cool, and make investing decisions based on good information — not out of fear or worry.Invest for the long-termSaving for retirement is a journey, not a sprint. Don’t change your investments simply because of day-to-day volatility. Set a strategy and stick with it. 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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College of the Redwoods volleyball expects to compete for GVC title

first_imgEUREKA >> Entering her third season as head coach, Oceana Matsudu believes the program has turned a corner.The former Humboldt State University volleyball star guided her team to an 8-10 record in 2015, which is one of the best finishes for the program in the past decade. With four starters returning from last year’s squad, Matsudu is confident her team is ready to take the next step and contend for a CCCAA Golden Valley Conference title.“We expect to work hard and to win,” Matsudu declared …last_img

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Todd’s Take

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Todd HultmanDTN Lead AnalystMuch of last week in DTN’s newsroom was spent preparing for USDA’s reports on Friday. Ever since USDA closed the lockup room in Washington, D.C., last year, World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report day has taken on an extra layer of anxiety as a whole village of staff plans and works behind the scenes to make sure we all hum in unison to get USDA’s new estimates out as quickly and accurately as possible.We’ve all seen hectic portrayals of newsrooms in the movies with people yelling and reporters running through the office to make deadlines. WASDE report day at DTN is actually much different. There is an eerie quiet when the clock strikes 11:00 a.m. Every second waiting for data to show up feels like a minute, and when the numbers do appear, a nervous chatter of cross-checking begins.Coming off of a five-week government shutdown, Friday had plenty of new estimates to examine, ranging from U.S. and South American crop estimates to Dec. 1 grain stocks to winter wheat seedings with numerous details in between. As DTN’s lead analyst with exactly one hour to prepare a public webinar, I was scrambling to highlight the most important findings and slap up the best charts I could get ready.Now in my 35th year of watching WASDE reports, I have to admit the process has not gotten any easier. In my role at DTN, I no longer trade markets, but the tight stomach never goes away and I am constantly wondering how USDA might surprise us this time. Both in my older days as a broker and trader and my more recent days as an analyst, there has always been a concern of having overlooked something.After Friday’s duties were done and I had a little time to reflect on what just happened, it seemed to me that the reports in general had been fairly tame. There was even some slightly bullish news. USDA reported record-high corn demand for the first quarter of 2018-19. World ending soybean stocks had also fallen more than expected, thanks to modest revisions from previous years.What I didn’t realize until later Friday evening were the surprises in Friday’s data, which many probably missed. It didn’t come from the WASDE report or the grain stocks report, or even winter wheat seedings. It came from USDA’s Oilseeds: World Markets and Trade, a less-talked-about publication that is full of helpful information (see it here: https://apps.fas.usda.gov/…).The February issue began with a bullish headline: “Smaller Supplies to Limit Brazil’s 2018-19 Soybean Exports.” Opening remarks explained how USDA expects Brazil’s soybean exports to drop from 84.2 million metric tons (mmt) in 2017-18 (the local season that just ended on Jan. 31, 2019) to 70.0 mmt, or 2.57 billion bushels (bb), in 2018-19.WASDE estimates, based on the U.S. crop year, don’t match with Brazil’s local season, but the thought that Brazil just exported 84.2 mmt of soybeans and USDA estimated China’s total import needs at 88.0 mmt is a bit breathtaking. A new-crop estimate of 70.0 mmt of exports offers some relief, but is still a lot of soybeans for the U.S. to compete against.Now for the interesting surprise: Under a section titled “Brazil and Argentina Soybean Stock Adjustments,” USDA explained how they had just gone back to 2000-01 and revised ending stocks estimates for the two countries. For Argentina’s latest marketing year, which will end on March 31, 2019, December’s ending stocks estimate of 16.85 mmt was roughly cut in half, to 8.44 mmt, or 310 mb.For Brazil’s latest marketing year, which ended on Jan. 31, 2019, December’s estimate of ending soybean stocks was raised from 775,000 metric tons (mt), or 28 million bushels (mb), to 1.15 mmt, or 123 mb — not a huge difference. However, looking back at prior years, USDA now says the local seasons from 2011-12 to 2016-17 had far higher ending stocks than previously estimated. Four of the years had ending stocks four times higher than originally estimated.As the report admits, “Determining realistic stock numbers for both Argentina and Brazil has been an issue for some time.” This reminded me of an email exchange I had with a USDA official in early 2016 (written about here: https://www.dtnpf.com/…).At the time, I asked the official if he could offer any insight as to how Brazil’s soybean prices could be so low at a time when USDA was estimating ending stocks at an “unbelievably low 17 mb for the current marketing year?”As I explained in the article, USDA was not willing to make a public comment, but the anonymous official offered some helpful possibilities, which included unreported production and unreported imports. He did not specifically mention Argentina, but it was not difficult to imagine Argentine farmers finding creative ways to get around punitive export taxes by crossing the border.Within four months, USDA revised 11 years of corn data for China, adding nearly 6 billion bushels to its count of ending stocks, and now has revised 18 years of South American ending soybean stocks, showing significant changes through the years.Understandably, some will cuss USDA for being off by so much all these years, and I understand the frustration. But as I see it, the real world is messy. You will not hear me bash USDA for attempting to make their estimates more accurate. I would also not want the unenviable task of trying to figure out how much grain is in any country, especially those that are politically closed or have reputations for political corruption.On a more practical note, however, our customers need to know that DTN’s Six Factor Market Strategies do not depend on USDA’s estimates of world grain inventories, and I would not recommend any producer bet the farm based on these numbers. Let these two recent examples remind us yet again why USDA’s world estimates should be taken lightly. We have other data and market clues that offer more help.After watching WASDE reports for so long, it’s no wonder why my stomach knots up on report day.Todd Hultman can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @ToddHultman(BE/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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How “Big-Data-as-a-Service” Can Help Smaller Companies Compete

first_imgbrian proffitt 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Big Data#biz#enterprise#Software center_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… The common perception of how big data is used centers around giant multi-national enterprises spending millions trying to fine tune their business strategies to eke out every last penny from their customers. But in reality, big data is worming its way into businesses large and small, often as a service instead of on-premises software.The Evolution Of The Comment CardVisit a bustling diner in a small town and you may see them tucked in among the bottles of ketchup and sugar packets on the linoleum counter: 3 X 5 comment cards. How was your meal? How was your service? Fill it out and tuck it in the little wooden box by the cash register, please.Regulars might make their concerns known directly to the staff, but diners such as this – like nearly every other business in the world – need to attract and keep new customers in order to grow. That’s the point behind comment cards: get as much feedback as you can so you to improve what needs fixing and keep doing what’s working well.Moving the comment card into the 21st Century is essentially what big data is all about.The most common form of big data in busines today was created as a technological response to tracking all of the data that was generated by commercial websites. Once marketers and other business execs saw that they could monitor an online customer’s responses all the way down to the mouse click, software engineers started figuring out a way to keep that data and mine it for ever more useful information.The combination of speed and volume needed to catch all of this information is what makes big data tools and technology really necessary. But for the vast majority of businesses that do not have big ecommerce sites, is big data even worth the attempt?It turns out, yes.Big Data Tools Work For Small Data, TooOne of the easier ways smaller businesses are taking on big data is seeing the general value of data analytics no matter how big or small the data set is. That message is practically a non-brainer: business owners are scanning the headlines every day and getting excited about applying data to their decision-making process.Social media is one quick way to implement big data within a smaller business. Used and analyzed properly, the information from social media can give any business instant feedback that’s far more robust and immediate than those old-fashioned comment cards.“Every time we perform a search, tweet, send an email, post a blog, comment on one, use a cell phone, shop online, update our profile on a social networking site, use a credit card, or even go to the gym, we leave behind a mountain of data, a digital footprint, that provides a treasure trove of information about our lifestyles, financial activities, health habits, social interactions, and much more,” wrote former Tivoli CEO Frank Moss in his 2011 book The Sorcerers and Their Apprentices.Big-Data-as-a-Service (BDaaS)Using big data can go beyond mining social media as a juiced-up form of the comment card. Big data can also be integrated with existing business practices to improve and expand day-to-day operations.It’s becoming pretty well-known that big data and fast data analysis are being used by large hotels and chains to improve their yield management processes. This kind of infrastructure is typically beyond the reach of smaller hotels, inns and bed and breakfasts. It’s probably overkill anyway: while a big hotel near Orlando, Fla., area might see 75 room pricing changes per day, a small independent lodging in a less-volatile market might only see a couple of price moves daily.But that doesn’t make the need for a smaller inn to adjust to local market changes any less important, says Erik Hovanec, CEO of LeisureLink, which specializes in providing yield-management as a service to smaller hospitality locations.One of LeisureLink’s clients is a 120-room property outside Myrtle Beach, SC, that “is great at hospitality, not necessarily at IT.” Hovanec described. Using his company’s service, the property is able to tap into information about local Myrtle Beach hotels and see real-time pricing information on other properties and make adjustments accordingly.This is exactly what the larger hotels and chains have been doing for a while. But now this service is available to smaller, mid-market establishments. Typically, a large hotel or chain might invest $30-$40 million just to increase their yield management from 90% to 95%. Hovanec boasts that since LeisureLink’s service is often the first real step into automated yield management for smaller hotels, their efficiency in yield management can rocket from 20% to 80%.Can Big Data Work For Every Business?At some point, any company considering a big-data approach needs to consider the one basic question: is there information out there that will help improve the business? If there’s a yes in there, then a search for a big data solution might be worth the effort.It’s not that we really need another another “as-a-Service” acronym, but thanks to the use of Internet-based Big-Data-as-a-Service (BDaaS), you don’t have to be a giant enteprise to play any more. These days, there’s a good chance that someone out there will have the information you need or can help you find it.Image Courtesy of Shutterstocklast_img read more

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Friday Field Notes

first_imgEducation and Training for VeteransCSFP supports military veterans in New York directly by providing resources, training opportunities, and networking events. We work closely with key partners in the Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) system to provide targeted, localized agricultural training opportunities to veterans. County extension offices make logical partners in our efforts to support veterans in agriculture due to their educational resources, community visibility, and existing networks. We see farming as both a way for veterans to make a living and a way to reintegrate with local communities. In this sense, CCE is able to connect interested veterans with farmers, homesteaders, and food producers who have similar interests within the community.  In August of 2015, working with Cooperative Extension of Allegany County and the National Center for Appropriate Technology, we ran a five-day intensive farm training program, called Armed to Farm, in Western New York state. The week long retreat utilized a mix of classroom and hands-on education to give 28 veterans a taste for what it would be like to start their own farm. The participants and instructors stayed together in a college dorm and took most meals together, creating a strong sense of camaraderie among the cohort.  This training program will be replicated again this year, in Central New York, and in 2017, in Eastern New York. Also last year, through our partners at Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County, we were able to offer an “Ag Industry field day” to transitioning army personnel at Ft. Drum in Northern New York.  Working in collaboration with the Transition Assistance Program on the base, we toured a number of different local farms, as well as a winery, and a large farm machinery dealer. We see this opportunity to work with Fort Drum as vital, since they currently have roughly 4,500 soldiers leaving the base as civilians each year.Armed 2 Farm 2015 Group PhotoTraining the TrainersIn order to help cooperative extension better serve veterans we dedicated a full day of our annual “train-the-trainer” event to bring together traditional agricultural educators with traditional military service personnel. This allowed folks who serve veterans to learn more about the viability of farming as a career, while simultaneously teaching extension educators about the resources that are available to veterans as they transition to civilian life. This type of network building is a hallmark of our work and allows us to leverage connections to create a much greater impact. In addition to structured professional development events, we spend a good deal of our time making connections between individuals who are working to support veterans but do not know about each other. As noted in last week’s Friday Field Notes, there are a lot of people who are working in this field but often they exist in silos, through no fault of their own. Breaking down these silos can be challenging and time consuming but the results are often powerful. Because our work encompass the entire State of New York (which is quite large), we depend upon these networks of service providers to connect with each other in order to identify the veterans in their communities who are interested in agriculture and provide relevant programming.On the Job TrainingShort, intensive training opportunities can be ideal for some but what about more formalized training for veterans seeking careers in agriculture? Although careers in agriculture are increasingly thought to be rewarding for veterans, most types of farm training are not eligible for military education benefits, such those offered through the GI Bill. Transitioning service members are able to use GI Bill benefits for certain kinds of training, such as in the trades (e.g. plumbing or electric), or for accredited college programs. However, no state that we know of currently allows military service members to use their benefits to get hands-on agricultural training on farms. To change this, we are working with partners at the New York State Division of Veteran’s Affairs to develop high-quality, on-the-job training (OJT) programs for veterans on farms. Our challenge now is to find the right kind of farms to host on-the-job training and then to match veterans to those farms. We hope to have two veterans placed on farms this growing season. Once we pilot OJT on a few farms and learn best practices, we believe that the model will be easy to replicate on farms across the state and perhaps in other states as well.Ft. Drum Soldiers Learn about Dairy ProductionLooking AheadOver the next 18 months we will be working with The Institute of Veteran and Military Families at Syracuse University to evaluate outcomes from this project. We will be looking at success in terms of how many veterans have started a career in agriculture, how many have improved an existing farm business, and also at how the veterans we have worked with may have improved health outcomes, quality of life, and community support. We look forward to sharing success stories, lessons learned, and best practices with you in the future regarding how extension efforts are helping military service members transition from service to farming careers. For more information on the project please contact Matt Weiss ([email protected]) or Dean Koyanagi ([email protected]) or call our office at 607-255-9911.Hands On Vegetable TrainingAbout MattMatt is an Ithaca, New York native who has returned to the Finger Lakes region after spending seven years living in Philadelphia, PA. Matt has a B.S. in Communications from Cornell University and an M.S. in Community and Regional Planning from Temple University, where he focused on environmental planning and the collaborative planning process. He has over four years of experience with cooperative extension and small farming enterprises.Interested in learning more about this subject? Want to share a story? We invite you to comment. In our second Friday Field Notes blog post we are highlighting how cooperative extension educators in New York worked with personnel from Fort Drum  and with the New York State Division of Veteran’s Affairs to build capacity to address the need for assistance for transitioning service members and their families in their job and career searches.  As you read this post, consider how your efforts to build community capacity to enhance the resilience and well-being of military families via job and career assistance might benefit  from a collaboration with cooperative extension in your community. MattThe Cornell Small Farms Program (CSFP) makes its home in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. CSFP works collaboratively with a network of Cornell University faculty and staff, Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) educators, and other small farm advocates throughout New York State to generate innovative research and extension initiatives that enhance small farm viability. We are currently engaged in a three-year project to support military service members and their families who farm and create pathways into agriculture for veterans seeking a career in the field. Transitioning service members bring many applicable skills with them to agricultural careers and they can make great farmers. Furthermore, those who farm often report that they find it deeply satisfying, allowing them to continue to serve their community, while also providing a nurturing environment in which they can heal. Farming is not an easy career for anyone but transitioning service members often encounter unique obstacles when considering entering into farming. There are over 800,000 military veterans in New York State, but they exist in a dispersed population, varying from 3-15% of the total population of each county. Because they do not have a dominant presence in any one location, specialized resources are often lacking, ultimately presenting a high barrier to entering agricultural jobs and further marginalizing these transitioning service members. Our project seeks to be a central point of contact and a resource hub for veterans who are passionate about agriculture in the state.Our strategy for supporting veterans takes a three-pronged approach:Provide educational opportunities in agriculture directly to military service men and women and their families (predominantly veterans);Empower traditional agricultural service providers AND traditional military service member service providers to better support veterans who want to farm;Certify farms in New York State to provide On-the-Job training to veterans.last_img read more

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Peter Gade excited to see revolution in Indian badminton

first_imgFormer World no.1 Peter Gade spoke glowingly of Kidambi Srikanth, who has climbed to the second spot in the world rankings on the back of four Super Series titles this year. Hailing his consistency, Gade believed it would be unfair to read his wins as a mere purple patch and that he deserves every bit of his top billing.Speaking to India Today in Mumbai, Gade did add that Srikanth will have to continue improving to keep legends like Lin Dan and Lee Chong Wei at bay, who may still have some fire left in them.Excerpts…INDIAN BADMINTON REVOLUTIONI am very excited to see the revolution in Indian badminton. I can see the great passion while I am here. It’s mainly because of Saina Nehwal, PV Sindhu and Srikanth. This is the time to seize for Indian badminton. I believe what we are seeing is only the beginning. Everybody is crazy about badminton currently.SRIKANTH DESERVING WORLD NO.2 Srikanth has shown for the past 3 or 4 years that he is men’s singles’ future. I think men’s singles is going through a transition phase. We still see some of the older players like Lin Dan and Lee Chong Wei and we have the younger lot like Victor Axelsen and Kento Momota and Srikanth. It’s quite an open field for me because anyone can beat anyone in the top 20 so it’s more open than in the past. Srikanth is one of the players taking the lead and hopefully for Indian badminton he will be a part of small group forming who can win Olympics.advertisementSRIKANTH WILL FACE TOUGHER COMPETITION IN FUTURELike I said before, we are in a transition phase. When we had Taufik Hidayat and I, there was this group of 4 or 5 players rarely losing, very rarely not failing to make semis. Now you have more players and it’s more open. I still think Srikanth will have to improve to beat players like Lin Dan and Lee Chong and Momota. Srikanth has been very good in taking chances and openings in draws, which is a sign of maturity and of moving to the next level. But he will have tough competitors in the future.CAN LIN DAN AND LEE CHONG WEI DO WHAT FEDERER AND NADAL ARE DOING IN TENNISI think they have the possibility of winning again. It’s for them to decide how their future should be. We all know their qualities. They have left an imprint on singles for many years. Let’s see what they can pull out for the next few years or at the Olympics. They have the control to that. They are really good friends of mine and I wish them the best.WOMEN’S BADMINTON EXCITINGI think women’s singles is very exciting at the moment. There are lot of different personalities. We can see they are 100 percent committed to this. Okuhara, Sindhu, Marin, Ratchanok. Hopefully they can make each other better and we can have some good rivalries on court to entertain the badminton fans. That’s what it’s all about.last_img read more

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OH SO CLOSE FOR NSW 15’S

first_imgMAROONS GET UP IN A THRILLER The 15 Years Boys Grand Final ended up in a drop-off, with NSW producing a great tactical game to push pre-game favourites Qld all the way to the wire in the much anticipated clash of the school Touch titans on Field one at Owen Park yesterday. The motivating presence of former Qld State of Origin Rugby League and Penrith 2003 Grand Final hero Scott Sattler, who spoke with the Qld boys before the battle, was not enough to throw the NSW boys off their game. From the opening whistle, the NSW 15 Years Boys came out switched on with their `A’ game intact, much more intense than their subdued performance in their 8-4 round loss to the Maroons on Tuesday. The urgency in defence was obvious, the talk enthusiastic and positive, and, as Apollo Creed said to Rocky, “The Eye of the tiger man – you’ve got to have the Eye of the tiger”. The NSW boys had done their homework, stiffened up their middle defence, and decided to work as a unit to counter Qld’s short steppy game. Coach Mark Hildebrandt had also addressed the problems the boys had had earlier in the week with lack of cohesion, consistent commitment to driving and attacking flow. The game initially was an end-to-end arm wrestle with both sides more committed to doing the hard work and securing field position in traditional drive rucking mode than they have been all tournament. Driving, we though, was something these boys only did on the Dream World dodgems, not with the legs and arms, so expansive had their clash in the round game been. NSW’s aggressive approach to attack and defence seemed to surprise the Queenslanders, who were waiting for the NSW challenge to peter out, as it had in the round game, but NSW, playing with purpose and energy, out enthused the Maroons early. The playmakers in both sides were like snipers firing shots when the opportunity arose from their sonic fast feet to sniff out any momentary defensive laxity. After ten minutes of an absorbing ruck / defend battle, the zip zip man we told you about in the round game wrap-up on Tuesday, decided enough was enough, and weaved some magic that had the crowd gasping and left the Queenslanders grasping at thin air. Kialu Brown picked up the ball from half, feigned left, stepped right, and as the defence adjusted to the right, he then popped a magic ball left into the hole for the ever present Ezekiel Meares to snaffle the ball for a 1-0 lead to NSW. The Qld Boys were stung into action and replied immediately with a well worked tap play that saw Cameron Curtis throw the last pass for Luke Capewell to dot down and put the Queenslanders back on level terms at 1-1. Josh Costello, John Tyson, David Briggs, and Dwayne Conlon started to relax and find some rhythm for Qld after the early speed of the opening exchanges settled. Both teams conceded penalties in good field position, but the defence was up to the task and the stalemate continued for most of the remainder of the half. Kialu Brown and Heath Bassett were working hard with Kenneth Forrest for NSW and posing lots of questions for the Queensland defence. Looking at the watch, time was up for the first half, so if you left your seat to grab a drink, you would have missed a great piece of play – that’s the NSW defender’s justification anyway! The siren sounding in the background, David Briggs ran hard sideways, his defender hanging back ever so slightly, Briggs feigned to go at the line himself, then straightened and threw a magic one handed short, low ball in traffic for the opportunistic Josh Costello to pounce on and score and give the NSW boys’ first swig of water at the break a particularly bitter taste. At 2-1 it was game on and everyone knew we were in for some game! The money invested in half-time entertainment was not well spent, with Usher pulling the pin at the last moment – thankfully the boys from Victoria, after enjoying their Plate final victory in the 15 Years division, stepped in and entertained the crowd with an impromptu haka. On the resumption of play it wasn’t long before Qld pressed the NSW line with David Briggs and Dwayne Conlon prominent. NSW worked hard in this passage and contained Briggs particularly well, with his head snapping more effective than his feet – Kelly Woods has got some competition in that department at last! The Queenslanders appeared frustrated and a controversial forward pass ruling when a touchdown seemed in the offing did little to improve their composure as a series of promising attacking raids came to naught. Kialu Brown decided to impart himself on the game again, and in one of their first shots in the second half, the clever # 7 surprised the defence by stepping back to the short side out of half and throwing a beautiful cut-out to Paul Rath who speared over in the corner to square the ledger at 2-2. Qld persisted with a short steppy style, but it was not working, and if they were going to get back into the game, they needed to mix it up and stretch NSW in different ways. Five minutes later Qld, after some good drive and expansive passing, created an overlap. A quick pass was thrown in the name of a touchdown and it produced one – but not for the intended recipient. That man Kialu Brown produced another huge play by snaffling an intercept and showing the Queenslanders the colour of his cleats as he raced away to take his team out to an imposing 3-2 lead with not a lot of time remaining. Qld were not desperately seeking Susan, but the equaliser, to push the game into extra time, and after concerted pressure, the enigmatic Josh Costello was the man for the job for Qld. The Qld # 7 produced his own piece of magic, just as he had in the round game clash with NSW on Tuesday. He ran across field feigned a switch, straightened, accelerated ran hard at the corner, then when the defence committed, he served up a well timed switch pass for Cameron Curtis to race in and apply the defibrillator to Qld’s title aspirations, 3-3. Right on full time a Qld raid was denied by some fantastic NSW defence and we were going into over time. The home town crowd got right behind the Queenslanders, and as the team was cocooned in their huddle before the drop off, they couldn’t help but be energised by the “Queensland” chant that emanated from spectators who tried desperately to lift their team’s spirit for the do or die moments awaiting. Qld had the tap and their `A’ list of attacking players took the field, determined to end the contest quickly. Josh Costello, the man for a big attacking occasion, created a good phase and Cameron Curtis stepped up to the plate, taking on the defence out of half and giving the Player of the Series, Dwayne Conlon just enough room to slide over and give Qld the title 4 – 3. The Queenslanders were rightfully exuberant, hugging and hi-fiving like they’d just won Lotto, with Josh Costello even producing a few dance moves to celebrate the win. For NSW it was heartbreak after the magnificent effort they mustered. The large crowd acknowledged the Blues skill, guts, and tremendous performance with a prolonged ovation – we’d certainly been treated to a fantastic contest. Kialu Brown was the best player on the field and the NSW playmaker was rightly rewarded with the Player of the final Award, some solace for the defeat. Qld Coach Dan Parker was ecstatic to win the drop off but acknowledged NSW and the magnificent performance they mustered on the day, “A great way to win…we practiced the drop off scenario so we were ok with what we wanted to do, but in many facets of the game NSW were better than us – their team work was probably superior and they dug in and did the little things a bit better than us…they’ve got one or two guys who can hurt you one on one, where as we’ve probably got four or five individuals and in the end we came through.” The Qld Coach who now has 2 Titles from 3 attempts in this division heaped praise on all his players, but was particularly pleased with the contribution of Josh Costello, David Briggs, and Dwayne Conlon who produced the goods under extreme pressure in the final. NSW coach Mark Hildebrandt did a fantastic job in turning the NSW game around in a few short days and his players responded magnificently with a great all round team effort. Game Go to Guy – Kialu Brown NSW – a great all round talent – he can do it all and a big match temperament to match – watch him go. So to the victor the spoils, but rest assured NSW will be back next year better than ever and ready to battle it out with their Qld counterparts and all other States. Written by Karley Banks 30/10/2004last_img
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2012 NYC/SOO Referee Appointments

first_imgCongratulations to the following referees on their appointments in the 2012 X-Blades National Youth Championships finals and State of Origin Series. National Youth Championships Finals18’s Boys FinalRob BowenMichael WattTim Pearson18’s Girls FinalJustin ParsonsAmanda Single Liam Cooper18’s Boys Community FinalMarcus MullerZachary SchembriAaron Mackenzie18’s Boys Developing State FinalGiancarlo LeungChristian del CastilloKim White18’s Girls Community FinalJo MasonBrendan JonesJenny Madders18’s Girls Developing State FinalKai MarutaSitha MeadAnne Beetham State of Origin – Game OneMen’s OpenDavid BaggioDale LawrenceLuke McKenzieWomen’s Open Brad SmithMick MedlinMatt LaveryMixed OpenSam ClarkBrett FreshwaterDamien CarlsonMen’s 20’sScott CampbellGavin KingSimon JacksonWomen’s 20’sRebecca WardSam HaconMichael WattMen’s 30’sKim SkellyNathan BudgeMark KellyWomen’s 30’sBrenton TurnerBeau NewellAmanda SingleMen’s 35’sBill SladeTammey ChappelMack HovermanWomen’s 35’sTerri ThomasKaren DaviesJames SteinbergMen’s 40’sBernard O’DonohueRichard McIlroyAndrew SmithWomen’s 40’sAnton Van RensburgNic AltinRob WardMen’s 45’sJohn FrostChris MurrayPaul SullivanMen’s 50’sCraig HughesVictor NaumovskiKen GilbertState of Origin Game TwoMen’s OpenDavid BaggioDale LawrenceLuke McKenzieWomen’s Open Damien CarlsonSam ClarkMark KellyMixed OpenBrett FreshwaterNathan BudgeKim SkellyMen’s 20’s Scott CampbellGavin KingMack HovermanWomen’s 20’sRebecca WardSamantha HaconChris MurrayMen’s 30’sBrad SmithMick MedlinMatt LaveryWomen’s 30’sJames SteinbergTerri ThomasBrenton TurnerMen’s 35’s Simon JacksonBill SladeTammey ChappelWomen’s 35’sKaren DaviesNic AltinRob WardMen’s 40’sBernard O’DonohueAndrew SmithJohn FrostWomen’s 40’sMichael WattTim PearsonRob BowenMen’s 45’sRichard McIlroyPaul SullivanBeau NewellMen’s 50’sVictor NaumovskiCraig HughesAnton Van RensburgState of Origin Game ThreeMen’s Open David BaggioDale LawrenceLuke McKenzieWomen’s Open Damien CarlsonSam ClarkMark KellyMixed Open Brett FreshwaterNathan BudgeKim SkellyMen’s 20’sScott CampbellGavin KingMack HovermanWomen’s 20’sRebecca WardSamantha HaconChris MurrayMen’s 30’s Brad SmithMick MedlinMatt LaveryWomen’s 30’sTerri ThomasJames SteinbergAnton Van RensburgMen’s 35’sSimon JacksonBill SladeTammey ChappelWomen’s 35’sKaren DaviesRob WardNic AltinMen’s 40’sBernard O’DonohueAndrew SmithJohn FrostWomen’s 40’sRebecca WardJo MasonMarcus MullerMen’s 45’sBeau NewellRichard McIlroyBrenton TurnerMen’s 50’sPaul SullivanVictor NaumovskiCraig Hughes Related LinksReferee Appointmentslast_img read more

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