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Two GSAS alumni win 2011 Nobel Prize in physics

first_imgTwo astronomers who received their Ph.D.s from Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences were named today as among the three winners of the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for their discovery that the universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating rate — a discovery that shook cosmology “at its foundations,” said the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in announcing the prize.Adam Riess, Ph.D. ’96, of the Space Telescope Science Institute and Johns Hopkins University, and Brian Schmidt, Ph.D. ’93, of the Australian National University, share the prize with Saul Perlmutter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley.At Harvard, Riess and Schmidt shared a mentor and Ph.D. adviser in Robert P. Kirshner, himself an expert on supernovae, and the author of the popular book “The Extravagant Universe: Exploding Stars, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Cosmos.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Ruling keeps NCAA from limiting some athlete compensation

first_img WATCH US LIVE Last Updated: 12th August, 2020 07:53 IST Ruling Keeps NCAA From Limiting Some Athlete Compensation A court decision the NCAA says will hurt college sports by allowing certain student-athletes to be paid “vast sums” of money as “educational expenses” will go into effect after the Supreme Court declined Tuesday to intervene at this point Written By A court decision the NCAA says will hurt college sports by allowing certain student-athletes to be paid “vast sums” of money as “educational expenses” will go into effect after the Supreme Court declined Tuesday to intervene at this point.Justice Elena Kagan denied the NCAA’s request to put a lower court ruling on hold at least temporarily while the NCAA asks the Supreme Court to take up the case. It plans to do so by mid-October.Kagan declined to put on hold a ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. In May it upheld a lower-court ruling prohibiting the NCAA from limiting compensation for education-related expenses for student-athletes . The ruling applies to athletes in Division I football and basketball programs.The NCAA said the ruling “effectively created a pay-for-play system for all student-athletes, allowing them to be paid both ‘unlimited’ amounts for participating in ‘internships’” and an additional $5,600 or more each year they remain eligible to play their sport.The ruling allows Division I conferences to still independently set rules for education-related compensation provided to student-athletes.Donald Remy, the NCAA’s chief legal officer, said in a statement Tuesday that the NCAA’s Division I Council will meet Wednesday to “put in place an immediate implementation plan.” Remy said that given the “adverse impact” of the appeals court’s decision and despite Kagan declining to put it on hold, the NCAA still plans to ask the Supreme Court to take the case.Jeffrey L. Kessler, an attorney for the student-athletes who sued, cheered Kagan’s decision.“We are delighted that the athletes will soon be able to receive the many education related benefits that the injunction will permit. This is the start of a fair and just system to reward these athletes who put their bodies on the line to generate hundreds of millions of dollars for their schools,” Kessler said in a statement. He represents former West Virginia football player Shawne Alston and other student-athletes who sued.In seeking to have Kagan put the appeals court’s decision on hold, the NCAA’s lawyer, Seth Waxman, wrote that allowing schools to pay student athletes “vast sums on the pretense that they are for an ‘internship’” or awards for remaining eligible to play “will eradicate the distinction between college and professional athletes, causing many consumers to lose interest as college sports are perceived as just another minor league.”The decision is another victory for those who want college athletes compensated beyond just a scholarship, and there are more changes coming on that front. The NCAA is in the process of changing its rules to permit athletes to be compensated for the use of their names, images and likenesses. That should open opportunities for athletes to be paid for endorsement and sponsorship deals, for appearances and for promoting products or events on social media accounts.Gabriel Feldman, director of the Tulane University Sports Law Program, said Tuesday’s decision “will open the door for schools to provide benefits they have not been able or willing to provide in the past.””The extent of those benefits remains to be seen and perhaps remains to be debated and discussed,” Feldman said. “But at least from the language of the injunction itself, the NCAA will no longer be able to cap non-cash education-related benefits and will have a limited ability to cap the cash-related academic achievement awards.”The NCAA is facing pressure from numerous states that have either passed laws or are working on bills that would make it impossible to prevent athletes from earning money from third parties for playing sports. The NCAA is seeking help from the federal government in the form of a national law that would supersede all state laws.Image credits: AP LIVE TV First Published: 12th August, 2020 07:52 ISTcenter_img Associated Press Television News SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT FOLLOW USlast_img read more

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Wellington Police Notes: Friday, July 31 – Sunday, August 2, 2015

first_imgWellington Police Notes for Friday, July 31 to Sunday, August 2, 2015: Friday, July 31, 2015:•8:15 a.m. Officers investigated a violation of a protection order in the 900 block S. Cherry, Wellington by known suspect.•10:35 a.m. Trent M. Bridges, 52, Mayfield, was issued a notice to appear for speeding 34 mph in a 20 mph zone.•11:50 a.m. Officers investigated harassment in the 700 block E. 7th, Wellington by known subject(s).•On July 30, 2015 at 1:15 p.m. Officers took a report of barking dogs in the 1100 block N. Plum, Wellington by known owners.•2:45 p.m. James R. Kessinger Jr., 23, Wichita, was issued a notice to appear for disobeyed stop sign and defective signal lamp.•5:45 p.m. Non-Injury, private property accident in the 2000 block E. 16th, Wellington involving a vehicle operated by Alanah J. Frazier, 18, Wellington and a parked and unoccupied vehicle owned by Brenda M. Thompson, Milan.•7 p.m. Officers took a report of a dog bite in the 800 block E. 4th, Wellington by known owner.•8:21 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1000 block N. Valentine, Wellington.•8:45 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1000 block E. Harvey, Wellington.Saturday, August 1, 2015•11:33 a.m. Officers investigated obstruction of law enforcement officers in the 200 block N. Plum, Wellington by known suspect.•1:00 p.m. Officers investigated criminal damage to a swing set in the 1100 block N. H, Wellington.•8:19 p.m. Shelby A. McLain, 22, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for no proof of insurance.Sunday, August 2, 2015•12:39 a.m. Katie M. Ford,  28, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for no proof of insurance and defective tag light.•12:50 a.m. Chloe E. Stafford, 18, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for defective tag light.•3:52 a.m. Philip D. Taylor, 43, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for disobeyed stop sign.•12:45 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a mower in the 700 block S. Washington, Wellington.•2 p.m. Laci M. Leggett, 31, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for illegal registration.•3:22 p.m. Officers took a report of an animal complaint in the 200 block W. 4th, Wellington.•5:56 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of license tag in the 200 block S. F, Wellington.•5:56 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a mailbox and stand in the 900 block S. Cherry, Wellington.•10:05 p.m. Chase E. B. Levalley, 18, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for speeding 70 mph in a 55 mph zone.•10:55 p.m. Jaden Y. Ohnemiller, 19, Caldwell, was issued a notice to appear for defective turn signal and defective brake lamps.last_img read more

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