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Mens Soccer Ohio State falls to No 8 Michigan State 21 on

Ohio State redshirt junior goalkeeper Parker Siegfried saves a shot attempt in Friday’s game against No. 8 Michigan State. Ohio State lost to No. 8 Michigan State X-X. Credit: Colin Gay | Sports EditorOhio State thought it had secured overtime against No, 8 Michigan State. With a 1-0 deficit heading into the 87th minute, redshirt freshman Devyn Etling scored his third goal of the season, a goal assisted by redshirt senior defender Brady Blackwell, who, along with midfielder Michael Prosuk, defender Michael Dichlan and midfielder Alex Nichols, had been celebrating a senior day. However, as Ohio State prepared for overtime, Michigan State showed why it was ranked as a Top 10 team. The Spartans moved quickly down the field, getting a shot off as time ticked down, something the team had done all day against the Ohio State offense, recording 16 shots, including seven on goal. After the initial miss and save by Ohio State redshirt junior goalkeeper Parker Siegfried, Michigan State junior defender nailed a header off the Siegfried deflection in the 89th minute to seal Ohio State’s (1-10-2, 0-4-1 Big Ten) 2-1 loss to No. 8 Michigan State (10-2-2, 4-1 Big Ten)Head coach Brian Maisonneuve said the Michigan State score was due to the slow transition of the offense to defense, especially as regulation was close to complete. “You would hope to lock it down with two-and-a-half minutes to go, but I mean it’s one of those instances where we might have gotten caught up in the moment a little bit and they put their foot on the petal,” Maisonneuve said. “They didn’t quit.”  The Spartans “put their foot on the pedal” all day offensively. Michigan State junior forward Giuseppe Barone connected on the first goal of the game in the 36th minute, landing in the top left corner of the goal past Ohio State redshirt junior goalkeeper Parker Siegfried after he had three saves to start the game. Siegfried ended the game with five saves on the seven shots on goal. While the Spartans shined offensively, putting the team in good positions throughout the game, Ohio State struggled, continuing its stagnant offensive performances the team had had in the last two losses to Cleveland State and Syracuse.  In the first half, the Buckeyes recorded only one shot against the Spartans, with one corner kick attempt in the first 45 minutes. Ohio State ended the day with two shots, only one of which were on goal. “We definitely took a step forward in our effort. We never gave up and that was fantastic. I thought our soccer was just OK today,” Maisonneuve said. “We have played three games in a week, so our legs are heavy and it showed in our quality and execution, but the effort was there.” In the 44th minute, Ohio State junior defender Osman Fofanah collided with Barone for a foul. As Barone stayed on the ground, Fofanah was pushed down by Michigan State senior forward Hunter Barone. Both Hunter Barone and Fofanah were given red cards and left the game. While the referee saw Fofanah’s tackle as a two-foot tackle where the defender came in cleats up and missed the ball, Maisonneuve said he saw something different. “It looked like a good hard tackle, but I will see it on video. It’s hard to tell, I didn’t see it live,” Maisonneuve said. “If he saw it right, it’s a red card, but I’m curious because I saw it differently.” Ohio State will finish its two-game homestand Tuesday when the Buckeyes face No. 5 Kentucky at 7 p.m. read more

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Bazaar del Mundos Latin American Festival Mata Ortiz Pottery Market begins

first_imgBazaar del Mundo’s Latin American Festival & Mata Ortiz Pottery Market begins Francella Perez 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsBazaar del Mundo’s Latin American Festival & Mata Ortiz Pottery Market returns to Old Town Friday, August 3 through Sunday, August 5.The annual event features more than 25 artists from all over Latin America displaying folk art, handcrafted jewelry, handwoven textiles, and more, as they provide live demonstrations of their crafts for attendees.Returning this year is Jacobo Angeles, an Oaxacan wood carver whose traditional “alebrijes” (Mexican folk art sculptures of fantastical creatures) were featured in Disney’s much-celebrated animated film, “Coco,” for which Jacobo was one of the movie’s consultants. August 3, 2018 Posted: August 3, 2018 Francella Perez, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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The gold stocks spent virtually the entire Friday

first_img The gold stocks spent virtually the entire Friday session in the green—and then rallied a bit into the close.  The HUI finished up 0.71%. The silver equities started off in the red, but quickly rallied back into positive territory.  Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed almost on its high tick of the day, up 1.89%.  We’ll take it. Platinum rallied quietly for most of the Friday session.  Palladium did as well, but that rally became far more robust once trading began on the Comex at 8:20 a.m. EST yesterday morning.  Then it appeared that a willing seller showed up around 10:30 a.m.—and that, as they say, was that.  Here are the charts. There’s never been a better time for “da boyz” to step out of the market for good Despite the big decline in the dollar index, there was almost no sign of that in the price action for gold in Far East and early London trading on their Friday.  The smallish rally in late-afternoon Far East trading got dealt with in the usual manner at the London open—and the gold price was back below the Thursday New York close by the London morning gold fix. After that, the gold price didn’t do a lot until around 8:45 a.m EST in Comex trading.  Then, in less than five minutes, the gold price popped six bucks or so, but that rally got cut off at the knees at 9 a.m.  By around 12:15 p.m. most of that gain had vanished—and after that the gold price chopped sideways in a very tight range into the 5:15 p.m. EST electronic close. The CME recorded the low and high as $1,208.50 and $1,218.90 in the February contract. Gold closed in New York on Friday afternoon at $1,213.80 spot, which was up $2.60 from Thursday.  Volume was pretty light at 88,000 contracts, net of December and January—but it was about 40% higher than Thursday’s volume. It was almost the same price pattern in silver.  The only noticeable difference was that once the price got capped at 9 a.m. EST in New York on Friday morning, silver traded within a ten cent price range for the remainder of the day. The high and low were recorded as $19.75 and $20.105 in the March contract. Silver finished the Friday session above the twenty dollar mark at $20.075 spot, which was up 27.5 cents from Thursday’s close.  Net volume was about 24,000 contracts, about 20% more than Thursday’s volume. The CME’s Daily Delivery Report was a bit of a surprise in gold.  I was only expecting a handful of contracts, but 108 were posted for delivery on Tuesday.  The big short/issuer was Canada’s Bank of Nova Scotia with 99 contracts—and the only long/stopper worth mentioning was JPMorgan Chase in it’s in-house [proprietary] trading account with 105 contracts.  As Ted Butler pointed out in his column last Saturday, JPMorgan Chase has stood for delivery on more than 96% of the 6,493 gold contracts issued so far in the December delivery month. In silver, there 19 contracts posted for delivery—and JPMorgan stopped 6 of those.  For the December delivery month, JPMorgan Chase has taken delivery of just about 61% of the all the December deliveries in silver, which comes to 2,015 contracts, or 10 million troy ounces in total.  That’s five days of world silver production.  The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. Another day—and another withdrawal from GLD.  This time an authorized participant withdrew 96,435 troy ounces.  There was also a withdrawal from SLV as well, but that wasn’t reported on the ishares.com Internet site until well into Friday evening EST.  This time they reported a withdrawal of 1,636,397 troy ounces.  In the last three business days there has been about 5.8 million troy ounces withdrawn from SLV—and in retrospect, none of this looks like “plain vanilla” liquidation to me, as it appears that the silver was more desperately needed elsewhere.  I’ll be very interested in Ted Butler’s take on this in his weekend commentary coming out later this afternoon. And, not surprisingly, there was no sales report from the U.S. Mint on Friday. And also not surprisingly, there wasn’t much in/out activity in gold at the Comex-approved depositories on Thursday.  Only 8,503 troy ounces were reported received—and 225 troy ounces were shipped out.  The link to that activity is here. It was somewhat busier in silver, as 370,292 troy ounces were reported received [all into Scotia Mocatta]; and 1,960 troy ounces were reported shipped out.  The link to that action is here. As I mentioned in Tuesday’s column, because of the Christmas holiday, the Commitment of Traders Report won’t be posted on the CFTC’s website until 3:30 p.m. EST on Monday. And as I mentioned in yesterday’s column, I don’t have that many stories for you today, so I hope you have the time over the weekend to read the ones that interest you the most. Against stupidity, the gods struggle in vain. – Friedrich Schiller I only have one ‘blast from the past’ for you today—and it’s from Broadway, sort of. Chess is a musical with music by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, formerly of ABBA, and with lyrics by Tim Rice. The story involves a romantic triangle involving two chess grandmasters, an American and a Soviet, fighting over a woman who manages one and falls in love with the other—all in the context of a politically-driven, Cold War-era tournament between the two men. Although the protagonists were not intended to represent any specific individuals, the character of the American was loosely based on Bobby Fischer, while elements of the story may have been inspired by the chess careers of Russian grandmasters Viktor Korchnoi and Anatoly Karpov. The musical didn’t last long, only three years in London’s West End in 1986—and two months on Broadway in 1988.  However, the music itself has outlived the musical in which it was embedded.  I’ve had the CD ever since it was released 30 years ago in 1984—and it still gets a fair amount of air time around my house. Here’s the second most famous song on this double CD set.  It’s a duet sung by Elaine Paige and Barbara Dixon, and the link to that youtube.com video is here.  If you get the impression that you’ve heard a more recent version of that duet—you probably have.  Elaine Paige sings it with Britain’s Got Talent superstar Susan Boyle more than 25 years later, and the pertinent bits of the story [along with the duet] start at the 1:35 minute mark in this next youtube.com video.  It’s a must watch/listen—and the link to that is here. It was the second day in a row where precious metal prices took off like a NASA space launch at the start of the Comex trading session—and the second day in a row where prices were capped within a few minutes of the start of these rallies. There’s nothing free market about this, as no “for profit” seller would ever sell their position in such a way that would not only stop these rallies cold, but reverse the price trend in the process.  Never happen—ever!!! So JPMorgan et al are still at it. But, having said that, with volumes as low as they’ve been over the last few days, Ted Butler is not sure if much damage has been done in the Comex futures market structure, as he feels that the vast majority of the short positions in both silver and gold are still firmly in the hands of the technical funds.  Unfortunately, the price action on both Thursday and Friday won’t be in Monday’s COT Report. No significant moving averages in gold have been penetrated to the upside during the current rally, but the 20-day moving average in silver has been well penetrated—and the 50-day moving average beckons.  Here are the one-year gold and silver charts with the 20 and 50-day moving averages embedded.center_img The Comex structure is still locked and loaded for a gigantic move to the upside in all four precious metals if JPMorgan et al wish it—or are instructed to stand aside and let it happen. The gold/silver highlights for me over the last 12 months was Her Majesty’s visit to the Bank of England gold vaults last December, Germany’s repatriation request from the New York Fed in January–and the ongoing massive amounts of gold disappearing into China this year, and now the vaults of JPMorgan Chase.  We should be getting China’s import figures through Hong Kong for the month of November any day now. How long this situation can be kept under control from a price perspective is hard to fathom, however it’s obvious that all four precious metals are being kept on a tight leash, at least for the moment.  But as Ted Butler has said several times during December, there’s never been a better time for “da boyz” to step out of the market for good. All we can do is wait it out, which is what we were doing this time last year as well.  However, it’s obvious to me that this price management scheme in the precious metals is on its last legs—and as I’ve said before, only the timing of the end game is unknown, and unknowable. That’s all for today—and I’ll see you on Tuesday. The dollar index closed late on Thursday afternoon in New York at 80.51—and then traded sideways until 9 a.m. in Tokyo on their Friday morning.  At that point it began to head south with a vengeance.  It cut through the 80.00 mark like the proverbial hot knife through soft butter—but someone was standing by to catch that falling knife about 11:35 a.m. GMT in London, as it appeared that the dollar’s decline was about to become terminal.  The low at that point was 79.75.  From there the index “recovered” back up to the 80.37 level before trading more or less sideways into the close.  The index finished the Friday session at 80.33—which was down only 18 basis points from Thursday.  At its low, the index was down 76 basis points, so the “rally” off that low was quite a save. The dollar index would have most certainly crashed if a buyer of last resort hadn’t put in an appearance.  Here’s the 3-day chart so you can see the whole move in some sort of perspective. Skyharbour Resources Ltd. (TSX.V: SYH) owns a 100% interest in approximately 400,000 acres of land between seven uranium properties in the uranium rich Athabasca Basin region in northern Saskatchewan. Six of the properties consisting of approximately 388,000 acres of prospective ground are strategically located near the Alpha Minerals (TSX.V: AMW) and Fission Energy (TSX.V: FIS) Patterson Lake South (PLS) uranium discovery area. The properties were acquired for their proximity to the PLS discovery and interpreted favourable geology for the occurrence of PLS style uranium mineralization. Skyharbour’s land position is now one of the largest in the Patterson Lake area. The Athabasca Basin hosts the world’s largest and richest high-grade uranium deposits accounting for approximately 20% of global primary uranium supply. There are still areas in the region that are highly prospective and underexplored as illustrated by the new 49.5 metres of 6.26% U3O8 discovery at the Patterson Lake South property. Please visit our website for more information. Sponsor Advertisementlast_img read more

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Uranium Energy Corp NYSE MKT UEC is pleased to

center_img Platinum hit its low of the day shortly before London opened—and then rallied quietly until just about lunchtime in New York.  From there it traded sideways into the close.  Palladium didn’t do much.  Here are the charts. In round numbers, gold was down about $70 during the reporting month, however you’d never know that by the way the banks, both U.S. and foreign, reacted during that time. In gold, ‘4 or less’ U.S. banks that hold Comex contracts actually decreased their net long position by 11,039 contracts—and their net long position now sits at 14,565 contracts—and all of that decrease came from JPMorgan’s long position.  Ted mentioned in the COT Report above that JPMorgan has a net long-side corner in Comex gold of 43,000 contracts on its own, so that means that the other 3 U.S. banks must hold a combined net short position of about 28,500 Comex contracts to make the numbers in the BPR balance out.  As to why JPMorgan holds a long-side corner in the Comex gold market—and the other 3 U.S. bullion banks are massively short—is still a mystery to me, but that’s the way it’s been for about a year now. Also in gold, 21 non-U.S. banks also went shorter in gold during the reporting month, despite the price decline.  They increased their net short positions by a smallish 2,118 contracts—and their net short position now sits at 38,977 Comex contracts.  It’s my opinion that a decent chunk of that is also held by Canada’s Scotia Mocatta—at least a third, or around 13,000 contracts.  So the remaining 26,000-odd Comex contracts, once divided up between the other 20 non-U.S. bullion banks are, like in silver, basically immaterial. The gold stocks jumped a bit over 2% at the open—and then hung in there until shortly after 11 a.m. when the gold price got capped.  After that the stocks quietly sold down for the remainder of the day, but managed to close just off their low.  The HUI barely finished in positive territory, up 0.67%.  I’m sure that the sell-off in the general equity markets was a factor in the gold stock’s poor performance. The new situation that has arisen around Russia and the petrodollar could certainly develop into something, as a move away from the dollar in oil payments would certainly not be good news for the U.S. dollar—and we’ll have to wait and see how this develops. It’s getting harder to believe that the powers that be can keep the current economic and financial system afloat much longer in the face of what is happening in the world today.  As I said yesterday, if push really becomes shove, then it’s my opinion that Russia and China together could end the price management scheme in all four precious metals, but the side effects of that would be pretty enormous—and not all of them positive, at least not in the short term, as the upheaval would be felt world-wide. But one thing it would end is the fortunes of all the world’s rich commodity-producing countries that Chris Powell says “insist on being poor”—and that would change the economic, financial monetary situation in pretty short order.  You have to wonder whether Russia and/or China would chance it, but the fact of that matter is that the current financial order is on its last legs anyway—and it only remains to be seen whether these two countries will be proactive with this—rather than reactive. Time will tell, I suppose—but how much time is impossible to know.  So we wait. I’m done for the day—and the week. Enjoy what’s left of your weekend—and I’ll see you here on Tuesday. Silver has quite a ways to go before it gets anywhere near its 50 and 200-day moving averages—and it could take awhile if the powers that be continue to hold silver under the $20 spot price mark. “Da boyz” were a no-show at the release of the jobs number yesterday The gold price didn’t do a thing in Far East trading on their Friday—and as I stated in The Wrap section of yesterday’s column, volume up until the London open was lower than I could ever remember seeing it. But shortly after trading began in London, some positive price action got underway, with higher ticks at both the 12 noon BST silver fix—and again at the Comex open in New York.  The usual smash down at the release of the jobs numbers failed to materialize.  But the serious price rally that began when London closed at 11 a.m. EDT in New York, ran into the usual not-for-profit sellers within 15 minutes—and that was it for the remainder of the day. The CME Group reported the low and high price ticks as $1,284.40 and $1,307.50 in the June contract. Gold finished the trading day in New York at $1,302.30 spot, up $15.50 on the day.  Not surprisingly volume, net of April and May, was pretty decent at 156,000 contracts. Sponsor Advertisementlast_img read more

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