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A’s Matt Olson returns to lineup, Khris Davis out with hip injury

first_imgOAKLAND — It was almost too perfect.With the return of first baseman Matt Olson to the roster Tuesday night, Athletics manager Bob Melvin was able to pencil in a lineup against the visiting Cincinnati Reds that had all the key ingredients of last season’s 97-win season.Almost.Olson was back after missing 34 games, but designated hitter Khris Davis, who collided with the left field fence in Pittsburgh Sunday while making a catch, was a late scratch with a hip contusion after originally being …last_img

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Bouwer wins as SA medal tally jumps

first_img2 September 2012Charl Bouwer led the way for Team South Africa at the London Paralympic Games on Saturday, winning gold in the swimming pool as the team took its medals tally from two to eight.Bouwer, who had won gold in the 400m freestyle S13 class at the 2008 Paralympics, showed that he has not only endurance but speed too as he raced to victory in the 50m freestyle in an African record of 23.99 seconds.Belarussian Ihar Boki, who had beaten Bouwer on his way to a Paralympic record win in the 100m butterfly the previous day, placed second, with Russia’s Oleksii Fedyna in third.African record and bronzeAchmat Hassiem, who lost a leg in a Shark attack, claimed a bronze medal in the men’s 100m butterfly S10 class. He touched in an African record of 57.76 seconds and afterwards dedicated his medal to his family and friends.Natalie du Toit contested the final of the 100m breaststroke SB8 class and finished well out of the running, in seventh place, in a time of 1:30.85, which was over 13 seconds behind the winner, Olesya Vladykina of Russia.Hendri Herbst, who claimed a bronze medal in the 100m freestyle in the S11 class on Friday, was seventh in the 50m final in a time of 27.57 seconds. He had earlier set an African record time of 27.02 seconds in the heats.World recordsThere was excitement on the track as Oscar Pistorius and Arnu Fourie set world records, but both marks were set in the heats, so no medals were on the line.Running in the T43/44 class, Pistorius set a T43 record of 21.30 seconds, while Fourie clocked 22.57 for a new record in the T44 classification.Pistorius, who made the semi-finals of the 400 metres at the Olympics on the same track, told journalists afterwards: “I couldn’t have hoped for a better return here. I didn’t expect to run a time like this tonight.”Apart from the new world records, there were also a number of medal winning performances from South African athletes on the track.Teboho Mokgalagadi captured a silver in the 100 metres in the T35 cerebral palsy class, edging out Xinhan Fu of China for the bronze by just two-hundredths-of-a-second in a time of 13.10. Victory went to the Ukranian Iurii Tasruk in 12.62 seconds.One of eachMokgaladadi previously won 100m gold in Athens and a bronze in Beijing and so completed the 100m set in London.Dyan Buis added another silver medal to the South African medal tally in the 100m T38 class. Victory went to Australia’s Evan O’Hanlon in a world record 10.79 seconds, with Buis, in second place, setting a regional record of 11.11.While Ireland’s Jason Smyth captured the headlines and a gold medal with a world record run of 10.46 in the 100m T13 class for the visually impaired, South Africa’s Jonathan Ntutu just missed out on a silver medal but won bronze in 11.03 seconds, a mere hundredth-of-a-second behind Cuba’s Luis Felipe Gutierrez.The only South African woman in action on Saturday, Anrune Liebenberg, made her mark by setting an African record of 25.55 seconds in the final of the T46 200 metres. That effort was good for bronze behind Cuba’s Yunidis Castillo, who won in a world record 24.45 seconds, and Poland’s Alicja Fiodorow, who took second in a regional record of 25.49.Wheelchair tennisWorld number 10, Kgothatso Montjane, defeated Spain’s Lola Ochoa Ribes 7-5, 6-2 in the women’s wheelchair tennis competition.In the men’s competition, Evans Maripa cruised to a 6-1, 6-0 victory over Mohammed Hamdan, but Sydwell Mathonsi, ranked 37th in the world, went down in three sets to world number 18, Stephen Welch.The men’s wheelchair basketball team suffered its second big defeat, going down 91-29 to the USA after previously losing 93-39 to defending champions, Australia. They were also beaten 74-50 by Spain.In the Velodrome, Roxanne Burns, competing in the women’s C4-5 500m time trial, placed 11th in a time of 42.621.Medal tableWith two gold, two silver and four bronze medals, South Africa moved up from 19th to 16th place on the medal table after Saturday’s competition.China remains out front, with 20 gold, 15 silver and 21 bronze medals for a total of 56.Australia (11, 5, 13, 29) is steady in second place and the hosts Great Britain (9, 16, 11, 36) have the second highest number of medals and are up two places to third in the standings.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Jordy Smith edged in Mr Price Pro final

first_img8 July 2013 Semi-finalsThe Australian contingent proved dominant on the final day of competition, with Stu Kennedy and Mitch Crews reaching the semi-finals and placing equal third. Stop number three of eight on the ASP Prime Series culminated with the most anticipated match-up of this year’s competition, with event standouts, Smith and Wilson, living up to expectations with inspired performances in front of a capacity crowd. ‘A big result for me’“Jordy and Julian have been standouts all event and there’s not much you can do when they’ve got you. This is a big result for me and I hope to continue my run and get a bunch more results to make the tour next year.” Wilson is the second Australian to win the event since Chris Davidson in 2008. He pocketed R407 500 (US$40 000) for the win and also rocketed to world number in the ASP World Rankings. “I’m really happy to get the win,” Wilson said of his 18.93 to 16.70 victory over Smith. “It’s my third time in Durban and I’ve gotten a good result each time. Nonetheless, he rocketed from world number 53 to 31 and will be looking to climb the ladder in the hope of qualifying for the World Championship Tour in 2014. ‘Pressure’“Jordy put the pressure on me at the start, but there were plenty of opportunities and I just had to flip the heat and put some scores on the board,” Wilson said. “That was the first time I’ve landed that air in a contest and I had to do something because I had my back against the wall. I’m stoked I could pull it off and come away with the win.” ‘A great place’“I really enjoy spending time here. It’s a great place, with friendly people, where I feel warm and comfortable. It definitely helps with my results.” Crews showed plenty of big match temperament in his semi-final clash with Wilson. Yet despite producing a full repertoire of manoeuvres, Crews was unable to find the near perfect score he needed to beat the polished and more experienced Wilson.center_img Kennedy suffered a case of nerves against Smith in their semi-final match up. Feeling the pressure against the local favourite, Kennedy went for big turns, but was uncharacteristically not able to stick them. Australian Julian Wilson defeated South African surfing star Jordy Smith in a memorable, high-scoring final to capture the Mr Price Pro Ballito on the KwaZulu-Natal north coast on Saturday. Dream runSmith had a dream run through to the final with a string of quality performances and high scores as he defeated Aritz Aranburu in the quarterfinals and Stu Kennedy in the semi-finals. Unfortunately for the South African, it was not the dream finish he’d hoped for. He nonetheless took home R207 500 (US$20 000) and the number two position in the world rankings. “I’m really happy to get all the way to the semis and to surf against Julian,” said Crews, who climbed from 39th to 27th in the world rankings with the win. Knowing he needed something extraordinary to take the win, Wilson put everything on the line, completing an extremely critical Alley Oop aerial manoeuvre to score the first perfect 10 of this year’s competition. Following up with an 8.93 slob grab reverse aerial, Wilson cemented his win over the local favourite. “It was an honour to surf in the final against Julian, I’m just sorry I didn’t win it,” said Smith, the winner of the event in 2010. “Julian stuck that air and it was amazing. I went on a trip to Reunion with him and he tried it a million times and didn’t make it and then he goes into the final and sticks it first time!” While Smith assumed an early lead to put Wilson in a combination situation (needing a combination of two scores) with his 7.67 and 8.83 (out of ten) scores, it was Wilson’s high-risk approach that was rewarded. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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What the CLUCK? – GC3K9TV – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – September 3, 2012

first_img SharePrint RelatedWhere Bats Dare — Geocache of the WeekMarch 15, 2017In “Community”Do you think this is a game? — Flappy Cache (GC507NW) — Geocache of the WeekMarch 24, 2014In “Community”Line of Sight — In the Distance (GC4JZTK) — Geocache of the WeekMarch 19, 2015In “Geocache of the Week” The cache hunt starts with the chicken statueSo, why did the chicken cross the road? To get to the Geocache of the Week, of course!What the CLUCK? (GC3K9TV) is a difficulty 1.5, terrain 1.5 traditional cache located just outside of Newburg, Wisconsin.Inspired by a 10-year-old geocacher who raises chickens for 4-H – a youth development organization, the cache quickly became a favorite among local cachers since it was created in May.Cache owner Stewzoo1 explains, “When you first drive up, the statue of the chicken is on opposite side of the road. You go to it thinking that it is the cache but soon learn it isn’t. When you turn around, you get a clear shot of the cache box across the street.  This still is not the cache, but a container holding cups of chicken treats (there is a note inside the box saying that this is to keep the natives happy and they still must find the log container). The container is located around the corner at the front of the coop. They must walk around, feeding the chickens in order to get to the cache.”The chickens now love it when geocachers visit, because they know that they’re going to get fed every time a car pulls up.Chickens on a mission to get their treatsWith 42 logged visits and 25 Favorite Points over a course of three months, this cache gives local geocachers something to talk about. In fact, What the CLUCK? made for quite the conversation at the West Bend $1000 Cache Ba$h 2012 Mega-Event.One geocacher who logged this creative find says, “Instant favorite point! This cache made me smile. I was like, ‘OMG, they’re real!’ And then we had fun laughing at the crazy sounds some of them made, and feeding them, and then looking at all the different varieties. Thanks for introducing cachers to your chickens and chickens to the geocachers… I imagine they probably have similar conversations as us, like ‘Look at that silly cacher with the hat and sunglasses!’ haha TFTC!”Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to [email protected] the natives happyShare with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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Driving More Efficiently

first_imgLike a lot of people, I‘m often running late. One of our two cars—a five-year-old Honda Civic Hybrid—has a digital readout showing fuel economy. Because I travel so much (ironically hopping on a plane or driving hours to lecture about energy savings or green building), I get lots of opportunity to track my mileage. When I’m running late and have to speed down to the airport—sometimes pushing my luck at 70-75 miles per hour—I find my mileage running about 40-42 mpg. On a more relaxed return drive at 60 or even 55 mph, my fuel economy jumps by 20% or more—to over 50 mpg.The difference is reduced wind resistance. It reminds me, in very clear terms, just how significantly I can save energy and money by altering my driving habits. In this column, we’ll take a look at a range of options for improving driving efficiency.Reduce your driving speed. Stick to the speed limit, or even drive slightly below (as long as you’re not increasing risk by impeding traffic). Reducing highway speed from 65 mph to 55 mph increases fuel economy by 10-15%. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) suggests thinking of every 5 mpg over 60 mpg as equivalent to paying at extra $0.30 per gallon for gas.Avoid aggressive driving. Rapid acceleration and hard braking can increase fuel consumption by as much as 33%, according to the DOE, while increasing pollution emissions five-fold. Coasting to a stop saves energy (since you take your foot off the accelerator sooner) and reduces wear on your brakes.Don’t idle your vehicle. If you’re going to be sitting for more than about 30 seconds, turn the ignition off to save fuel. Most cars don’t need to be warmed up—except, perhaps, in the coldest weather.Drive direct routes and avoid traffic. By shortening your route, you can save energy—though on a rough, curvy road, your mileage may drop. Try to avoid rush hour.Use cruise control on highways—usually. If you have a heavy foot, use cruise control to maintain even speeds at or slightly below the speed limit. On hilly highways, though, you may be able to do better without cruise control by slowing down somewhat on inclines and then allowing gravity to help on downhills.Use the proper gear. If you have a manual transmission, upshift through the gears quickly, unless extra torque is needed (uphill, pulling a trailer, etc.). With an automatic, ease off on the accelerator to induce upshifting. If your car has an “overdrive” gear, use it on highways.Use your air conditioner sparingly. When driving around town, open your windows and turn off the A/C to save energy. On highways, it’s better to close windows to minimize drag.Keep tires properly inflated. Underinflated tires will reduce your fuel economy. Most tires lose about 1 psi per month and 1 psi for every 10-degree drop in temperature. For every 3 psi reduction in tire pressure, fuel economy drops by about 1%, according to the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), while reducing tire life and detracting from handling. Buy low-rolling-resistance tires, which can boost fuel economy by as much as 4%.Keep the engine tuned up. An well-tuned engine will perform better and achieve better fuel economy. Service your vehicle regularly, including oil and air filter changes. Use the recommended grade of motor oil.Remove rooftop racks. Anything attached to your vehicle will increase aerodynamic drag and reduce fuel economy. When not in use, remove rooftop bicycle, ski, and luggage racks. Even a flag on your antenna can reduce your mileage by 1-2 mpg (negating your patriotism).Remove unnecessary weight. Added weight in a car or truck makes the engine work harder; 100 pounds of extra weight reduces fuel economy by about 1%, according to ACEEE.Park in the shade. Keeping your car cool when parked not only reduces the need for air conditioning when you start up, but it can also reduce evaporation of gasoline.Buy a more efficient car. The next time you’re in the market for a vehicle, choose a more efficient model. Carefully consider whether you really need a truck or SUV.last_img read more

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