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Tegat calls for ruthless MBU

first_imgAs Montego Bay United prepare to host teams in Group Three of the 2016 Caribbean Club Championship at the Montego Bay Sports Complex, the club’s head coach Paul ‘Tegat’ Davis says he wants his strikers to be ruthless in front of goal irrespective of the opponent. Davis, who has been putting the players through a rigorous training regimen since last week, told The Gleaner that if his players perform anywhere as impressively as they currently do in the Red Stripe Premier League, they should finish on top and advance to the next round. “Playing these games at home offer us no distinct advantage because all the teams participating are professionals and will be coming to play hard football,” said Davis. MBU will first tackle Cayman’s Scholars International on Wednesday before taking on Trinidad’s Central FC on March 13. Before that, Scholars meet Central on March 11. MBU are in a rich vein of form, winning four of their last five matches in the domestic league with forward Owayne Gordon having the time of his life. Gordon, who has 13 goals so far this season, struck back-to-back braces recently in league play and will be hard to contain. Speedy winger Alan Ottey along with the engine of the team’s midfield, Jermaine Woozencroft, captain Dwane Ambusley and goalkeeper Jacomeno Barrett will all play key roles for MBU.. But the hosts may have to make do without two key defenders in John Barrett and Cordel Simpson, both of whom are nursing injuries. Davis, however, is cautiously optimistic on the defenders being ready in time for either of their two assignments. “John and Cordel are two of our better defenders and we will need them to be fit and ready, but if that’s not possible we will have to win without them. I am very confident in the abilities of my players,” he said.last_img read more

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Practical Design Advice for Zero-Net-Energy Homes

first_imgQ. When your heating and cooling loads in a net-zero home are already smaller than the capacity of anything but a single wall-mount ductless minisplit, how do you balance correct sizing with adequate distribution?Answer 3 — Leigha’s question in Comment #17 is a variation of the first question in a climate that will need cooling as well as heating. The house sounds like a single-story. With the bedrooms to the north in this very well insulated passive solar house, I’m assuming that they don’t have a ton of glazing, which in this case drives heat gains from the sun, as well as heat loss. So I might be comfortable using just a single unit in the main space if the occupants understood that the bedrooms will be cooler than the main space in winter and warmer in summer, and if the rooms met my 1,000 BTU/hr criterion mentioned above.Having said that, the system you mentioned that incorporates a wall cassette for the main space, and a ducted unit for the bedrooms would be a step up in occupant satisfaction for many people, because the bedrooms are now able to have their own setpoint. A ducted unit with the temperature sensor built into the air handler (the stock setup) averages the return temperature from the bedrooms to decide how much heating or cooling to provide. You also have the opportunity to incorporate some good filtration in that system. MARC’S ONLINE COURSE Interested in learning more? Since 2012, I’ve been working with NESEA and HeatSpring to teach an online course as part of NESEA Building Energy Master Series with other experts from the NESEA community. Over 150 professionals have taken my Zero Net Energy Homes design course, and the next course starts on February 3rd. This course is an opportunity to study with me: to ask me questions for a full ten-week semester. You will walk away with a comprehensive understanding of all of the key components of a zero net energy home — envelope, systems, and renewables — and how they fit together, with key pitfalls to avoid, and numerical calculators for sizing peak heat loss, glazing amounts, annual energy use, and solar electric systems that will empower you to confidently design a zero-net-energy home. Successful students will actually do a full design of a zero-net-energy home, and earn NESEA’s Zero Net Energy Homes Professional Certificate. The course is approved for 12 AIA CEUs + 6 MA CSL credits (1 hour for Code, 1 hour for Workplace Safety, 1 hour for Business Practices, 3 hours for Energy).If you’d like to see some free content from the course, you can sign up for a free test drive of my course here, or check out a free 26-minute video lesson here. Q. How exactly are these companies determining the capacities of these units? Is there a way to actually calculate, or even estimate, how much heat these units will actually output at -13°F?Answer 5 – On ratings and Rheannon’s question in Comment #14: the only way through this is to get published engineering heating capacity from the manufacturer and then vet it through their representatives. If there are contradictions, pursue them until you are satisfied or until you reach a point where your confidence is so shaky you abandon consideration of that product.For example, Dana mentions the Daikin Quaternity, and yet I can’t seem to ever find a capacity table below 14°F. That’s not low enough to make me comfortable in specifying it. I know some Daikin VRF machines have been observed operating at -15°F, and I’ve seen the Mitsubishi Hyperheats operating at -22°F at a school in west central New Hampshire. In Zones 6 there are increasing numbers of these heat pumps being installed. (We did some Fujitsus north of the White Mountains this year.) In Zone 7, I’d be looking at some backup heat. It all depends on the client’s appetite for risk. Say a 120-square-foot room has contact area through the floor with a heated room. (Let’s assume that the room under consideration is above the heated room.) Let’s assume that the room has 150 square feet of wall area that faces the upstairs hallway, which we’ll assume is open enough to the first-level heated room that it is at the same temperature as that room.Each of those areas is has a thermal resistance of about R-3. So there is a UA of (120+150)/3 = 90. This is a room with a pretty high area of contact with the heated room. For every °F difference across these assemblies, there is 90 BTU/hr of heat transferred. Say you want that room to be 68°F when the heated room is 71°F. The available heat transfer is 270 BTU/hr.If the room to be heated has a 15-square-foot window that has a U-factor of 0.2 (a good triple-glazed window) and a wall area to outdoors of 150 square feet with a U-factor of 0.03, a ceiling of 120 square feet with a U of 0.02, and an air leakage rate of 4 cfm, then the room UA to outdoors is (15×0.2 + 150×0.03 + 120×0.02 + 4×1.08) = 14.2 BTU/hr.If we divide 270 BTU/hr by 14.2 BTU/hr, we find that (when the room is unoccupied) there is an energy balance when the indoor/outdoor temperature difference is 19 F°. With a desired indoor temperature of 68°F, that’s 49°F outdoors. Not impressive — and this is a superinsulated house.Now, add some internal gains and things change. Put a person in there with an iPad and maybe an LED reading light and you more than double the available heat, and now you have a balance at 45°F to 50°F outdoors. But if you’ve been gone all day, and it’s been 30°F outside, you’re not coming into a warm room if you left the door closed.What about if it’s open? That helps a lot. How many cfm move through an open door? I think it’s different depending on where the door is. If it is up a floor, it has more air flow through it than if it is on the same level — the difference in height between the heated room and the door opening helps that movement of air and energy. I noticed this recently in a house with a minisplit in the main living space, and an open door to an adjacent bedroom, and open doors on the second floor to two other bedrooms. The first-floor bedroom was noticeably colder. It had less conductive contact area too, and more exterior area, so all things weren’t equal; but it was striking how much cooler it was. (The main level was 72°F, the upstairs rooms were 68°F, and the first floor room was 63-64°F.)I tend to think of an open door as being equal to a decent bath fan — it’s worth 50-100 cfm. So at the low end, 3°F temperature difference buys you 150 BTU/hr, and at the upper end it’s double that.So Aaron’s 3,000 BTU/hr bedrooms aren’t going to be heated by a point-source heater, at least to satisfy most people’s comfort criteria. My guideline is that if people will tolerate 4°F lower than the heated space (which in my mind means 72°F heated space, 68°F bedroom) and they leave the doors mostly open, then a point-source heater is viable when the heat loss is 1,000 BTU/hour and the room is occupied; 1,500 BTU/hr is kind of my soft cut-off for considering it. Beyond that, I’ll provide some electric resistance backup in those rooms.A couple of other thoughts to confuse the issue:How hot is the heater? The plume of very hot air off a wood stove creates a significant layer of very warm air at the ceiling level that drives more conduction and more convection. A wall mounted minisplit is the opposite extreme (well, maybe a radiant floor is) because it mixes the air in the room and there is little stratification.Who is going to live there? In speculative development with multiple units, there will be someone who hates you because you didn’t put heat in their room. I speak from experience.Cooling is harder. A cooling source on the main floor won’t cool the upstairs. Tidbits on some of the rest of the posted questionsMachines that offer separate sensible cooling and humidity setpoints almost always will do that at a cost in efficiency, because to maintain a relative humidity setpoint without over-cooling a space they will use some form of reheating the air. This means they cool the air down to wring the moisture out, then heat it back up to avoid over-cooling.They may do this cleverly — like using the rejected heat of the compressor for reheating — but this is not an efficient operating mode. It may be more efficient than operating a separate dehumidifier, but the two options would need to be carefully compared to make that determination. I know from experience that using the Dry mode in the Mitsubishi VRF equipment uses more energy than running that equipment in the Cooling mode.I would tend to agree with Dana that most buildings with minisplits won’t need additional dehumidification, but there are always conditions where there is no cooling load but there is a moisture load, and if you can’t tolerate occasional excursions out of the ASHRAE comfort envelope (60% RH limit, if I recall correctly), then you need some independently settable humidity level. Scott, the best way to assess whether the minisplits work well in Dallas is to ask people who have been using them in similar applications to yours.On point-of-use demand electric water heaters: Say you start with 45°F water and want a 1.5 gpm shower at 110ËšF — that load is just a smidgen under 15 kW, or 60 amps. So you need to consider electrical panel capacity first.By comparison, a typical electric tank type water heater is 1/3 of that. You can buy the demand heater for about half the cost of a really well insulated electric tank type, and installation is probably a bit lower in cost. If you need two demand heaters, probably there aren’t savings over the tank type and no worries about trying to take a shower when someone starts the dishwasher or clothes washer or just turns the kitchen sink tap wide open.When might a point-of-use electric be a reasonable choice? Small urban single-occupancy units where the laundry is in the basement. Basically, when only one person needs to decide which uses to satisfy with the single unit.On EcoCute machines (Japanese air-to-water heat pumps): Yes, it would be great to get them into the U.S. I wonder if the barrier is a refrigerant that operates at 1,500 to 2,000 psi — What will UL say about that? First of all, thank you very much to all of you who contributed to this thread. I agree with all of you completely.☺ Remember, the reason Internet discussions are so acrimonious is because the stakes are so low…Last week, I published an article titled “Minisplit Heat Pumps and Zero-Net-Energy Homes” on GBA. At the end of the article I asked readers to submit questions on topics that they’re looking to learn more about so I could provide a “mini-consultation” and answer their question while hopefully helping others with the same questions. Here are answers to the five questions that I picked. Here’s another approach: do the whole house as a single-zone ducted system. With a strongly passive solar design, the whole-house ducted system can serve to redistribute air from the warmer side of the house to the bedrooms.As to limits to the length of ducts: these units don’t have the static pressure capability of traditional American central forced-air systems, so looking carefully at the unit specification is important, as well as good duct design. For example, Mitsubishi’s SEZ air handler (used on the Mr. Slim models) has a top setting of 0.20 inches of external static pressure — that’s low! The Fujitsu RLFC series has a capability of 0.36 inches on the smaller air handlers, and lower on the largest one in that series. So you have to check. Q. Our current energy load calculations show around 50,000 BTU/hr for heating and cooling. We were considering forgoing cooling, but with the Daikin Altherma system we could possibly have it as an added bonus to domestic hot water and radiant floors. Unfortunately, the initial cost has us leaning towards a condensing gas water heater.Answer 4 – Eric’s question in Comment #4 is about the economics of comparing a gas condensing water heater with a Daikin Altherma, which can also drive a radiant floor and make domestic hot water, and can provide chilled water for cooling in the summer. Before I address this, may I comment that a design load of 50,000 BTU/hour for a house measuring 2,100 square feet in Zone 5 seems way high — at 24 BTU/hr/sf, maybe even higher than a code-minimum home today. My quicky guideline that I tell people is to set a target of 10 BTU/hr/sf in Zone 5. So make sure your load has been properly calculated; and if it has, first spend your money on reducing that load.It sounds as though the base solution of the gas water heater has no cooling, but even though the Altherma offers it, you don’t need to implement it, especially since it means a second distribution system — added to the quite costly concrete/steel floor hybrid, you’ll need a ducted system for the cooling.To begin looking at costs and benefits, you need to compare fuel costs. If the gas available is natural gas at current fuel prices (let’s say $1.25/therm) and the heater operates at 90% efficiency, then the heat costs about $14/million BTU. Say your electricity costs are $0.15/kWh. To get the same cost per BTU, the Altherma needs to operate seasonally at a Coefficient of Performance of about 3 — three units of heating for every one unit of electricity used. I don’t have data on Altherma units other than a couple of retrofits with very extenuating circumstances, but from the published engineering data I think an annual COP of 3 in Zone 5 in a low temperature hydronic radiant system is plausible.So at that point you’ve spent more in capital cost than the gas system for similar annual cost.What the heat pump offers you is the possibility on making your own energy with onsite renewables, which you can’t get with the gas. Buying the renewables is a separate economic decision: What does electricity cost where you live, what’s the history of price inflation, what are incentives beyond the Federal 30% tax credit, etc.? The prices on solar electricity continue to drop, the systems are long-lived and reliable, and you’re investing in your own energy source. And even if you choose the gas heating system, you’ll still be using electricity, so that choice doesn’t preclude using onsite renewables; it just makes it hard to get all the way to net zero.But please first work on getting that 50,000 BTU/hr down…If it’s OK, I’m going to pull Peter’s question in Comment #9 into this, because he asks to compare minisplits with ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs). Peter, I approach this question in two different ways. The first is to recount some analysis done by the team who designed the Putney School’s 16,000-square-foot Net-Zero Field House. Being in southern Vermont, they felt that air-source heat pumps were perhaps on the edge of their applicability.Fortunately, the HVAC engineers Kohler & Lewis from Keene, New Hampshire, had switched their office building to minisplits a couple of years earlier and had seen their system operate down to -15°F even though there was no published data at those temperatures. And then Andy Shapiro led the team through an interesting analysis. They asked, if the GSHP system could truly achieve a full point of COP higher than the minisplits (I can’t recall what values they picked for the two COPs, just that they were separated by 1!), what would the cost be of each heat pump system plus the cost of the solar electric system necessary to provide the energy consumed by the heat pump system? (In essence, the cost of the heating system cost plus its associated fuel cost over the years.)If I recall correctly, the minisplits, even after conceding a higher COP to the GSHPs, came in something like $4/square foot less than the GSHP system and the smaller associated solar electric system. And as Dana said in his post, we now have some really excellent hard field data about the COP of minisplits in cold climates that is really encouraging.The second way I approach your question is to say that one thing I really like about the minisplits is how they are packaged systems from a single supplier, and are highly engineered as a system and therefore very reliable. GSHP systems are, at least where I have practiced, essentially custom engineered and installed, usually by several entities who have a shared responsibility to make sure the systems perform. Knowing that this will cause howls of au contraire to arise, I will say that GSHPs have been the most problematic HVAC technology I’ve worked with, and so I choose the Japanese air-source equipment without a second thought at this point (and I have worked with GSHPs on projects ranging from zero-net-energy homes to buildings up to 70,000 square feet). Q. How do you decide when ducted minisplits (rather than ductless minisplits) are worth the time and expense to install them?Answer 1 — I’d like to combine the questions included in Comments #1, #5, and #13. The essence of the question is: When do we have to transition from a point-source heating strategy to a strategy that provides each room with its own source of space conditioning? (I say space conditioning because we may ask this question just as well about providing cooling.)The first question we should ask is, are doors open or doors closed? And a subset of “doors open” might be a small transfer fan moving air from a warmer space where a heater is located to a room without a heater. (Robb Aldrich at Steven Winter Associates has done great work on this strategy.) Let’s look at “doors closed” first. RELATED ARTICLES Rules of Thumb for Ductless MinisplitsJust Two Minisplits Heat and Cool the Whole HouseHow To Buy a Ductless MinisplitBruce Harley’s Minisplit TipsMinisplit Heat Pumps and Zero-Net-Energy Homes Ductless Minisplits May Not Be As Efficient As We Thought Long-Term Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast Q. The thermostat for our Mitsubishi ducted system only goes down to 63°F. Do you know of any way to reset the thermostat to have a lower minimum temperature?Answer 2 — This question is an easier one. In Comment #12, Eric asked about his four-year-old Mitsubishi multi-zone system and how to set the temperature lower than the 63°F limit. Today we’d use the controller Honeywell provides to Mitsubishi, the MHK, which allows communication over the Web, and much wider setpoints. I re-confirmed today with Mitsubishi engineers that this control is unfortunately not retrofittable to the older system.So my suggestion is that you try just shutting the second floor ducted system down at night completely, and let the main floor wall cassette do the work overnight. This would work well when you’re away for a longer period of time.Another way, perhaps a bit cumbersome, is to figure out a way to put a tiny bit of heat right at the thermostat and fool the sensor into thinking it’s warmer than it really is. We’re talking about two bulbs worth of Christmas lights… or mount your iPhone charger right below the thermostat overnight.As to your question on the flexible duct work — flex duct has a bad rap because it’s easy to install so badly. In your case, where the runs are short, it virtually assures you that there is very little duct leakage, and it’s not long enough to cut down on the air flow unless it’s been installed such that it is crushed or otherwise improperly installed. I’d leave it, as long as the rooms being served are being adequately heated and cooled. (Disclaimer: I just put flex duct in my own system — using a 5 or 10 foot flex duct runout to the register boot makes the system quiet — just stretch it out and don’t crush it.) Marc Rosenbaum is the director of engineering at South Mountain Company on the island of Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. He writes a blog called Thriving on Low Carbon and teaches a 10-week Zero Net Energy Home Design course as part of the NESEA Building Energy Master Series, you can test drive the course for free here.last_img read more

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“SIXTY SECONDS IN TOUCH”

first_imgA look at what’s happening in Touch around Australia. *Now that the excitement from the National 18 years Championships has settled down the next event on the ATA calendar is near. The Australia Cup will be held on October 7-9 at Elwood Park in Melbourne. 19 teams have been nominated for the tournament including sides from ACT, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and NSW country. There will be mens and womens divisions. Elwood Park is located on the corner of Head St and Ormond Esplanade, Elwood. The Australia Cup draw will be available on the ATA website from Wednesday September 29th. *A lot is happening over the next few weeks for Queensland Touch. Queensland welcomed the visiting New Zealand teams on Friday September 24th to our shores. The highlight of their tour will be on October 1st and 2nd when Queensland A teams will play New Zealand in a three game series in Toowoomba. Queensland Touch will host the Inaugural 2004 Coca-Cola QLD Team Titles in Bundaberg on the 23rd and 24th of October. There will men’s, women’s and mixed divisions from under 20’s to over 50’s for the competitive and the social players. The nomination fee is $250 per team which includes a free party for all participants on the Saturday night. The tournament is being dubbed “the biggest social event on the 2004 touch calendar!” For more information contact www.qldtouch.com.au *NSW Touch will be conducting school holiday clinics in the Sutherland Shire during the school holidays. The clinics run on the 28th, 29th and 30th of September and the 1st of October. All clinics start at 1pm, and the venues vary. So take the kids along and give Touch a go! For more information contact www.nswtouch.com.au *The ACTTA Super League Canberra Cup will be held in Canberra on November 5-7, 2004. Team nominations close on October 8th, so don’t miss out! Contact www.acttouch.com.au for more information. *Following the National 18 years Championships, WA 18’s boys Captain Shanon Boyd has been awarded the Shaun Jones Memorial WA 18 & under Player of the Year Award. Following the tragic loss of Shaun in March this year, TouchWest will present the award every year in his memory. *Players selected for 18 years teams for the Youth World Cup in Kawana in January will receive their letters of offer by the end of this week. 18 players were selected in each men’s women’s and mixed team. Players will have till October 14th to accept their offer and pay their deposit. The final selection camp will be held at the Sports Super Centre, Runaway Bay, Qld on November 12-15. The Australian Youth World Cup 18’s sides will be announced following this camp. *Rachel Moyle is currently on holidays. By Lisa Plummerlast_img read more

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Video: Laquon Treadwell Is Healthy Enough To Do Backflips On A Trampoline

first_imgLaquon Treadwell is upside down as he performs a flip on a trampoline.Laquon TreadwellOle Miss wide receiver Laquon Treadwell suffered a gruesome broken leg late in the 2014 season, but has since made a remarkable recovery. He was able to join his teammates for spring practice, and posted an Instagram video this afternoon of himself doing backflips on a trampoline.Yes, you read that correctly. Treadwell’s leg looks plenty healthy in these two clips, but we’re thinking Rebels’ head coach Hugh Freeze’s heart will skip a beat or two when he sees them, if he hasn’t already. Not sure you want your star playmaker who is on the mend from a major injury to be on a trampoline.  still got it in me.. A video posted by @successfulquon on May 23, 2015 at 1:16pm PDT  A video posted by @successfulquon on May 23, 2015 at 1:21pm PDTlast_img

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4-Star Point Guard Charlie Moore Announces Commitment To Memphis

first_imgCharlie Moore, a Memphis commit, playing basketball for his high school.YouTube/ballislife midwestMemphis basketball had a down year by program standards in 2014-15, going 18-14, but the Tigers got a big lift today, with the commitment of four-star Chicago point guard Charlie Moore.Charlie Moore at his press conference: “Today is a great day to be part of the Memphis Tiger program. Tiger up!”— Jeff Borzello (@jeffborzello) November 12, 2015Josh Pastner and Memphis badly wanted a point guard in the 2016 class — it got one today in Charlie Moore. Quick, tough, aggressive.— Jeff Borzello (@jeffborzello) November 12, 2015Charlie Moore is the first local player to choose Memphis since Derrick Rose.— Michael O’Brien (@michaelsobrien) November 12, 2015Moore is rated as a four star player by every major recruiting site, and is the No. 1 player in Illinois, per 247Sports. last_img read more

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Oversigning footballs latest overindulgence

Oversigning. It’s when a school signs more recruits than it has roster spots available. The gods of college football’s recruiting gluttony? The SEC. Today is National Signing Day, college football’s version of the NFL Draft. However, instead of the pro teams picking players, the players choose their schools. The NFL Draft is spaced out over three days. ESPNU has dedicated 10 straight hours to coverage of Signing Day. There’s no such thing as excess when it comes to football in this country. Schools are allotted 85 total players on scholarship at a given time. Last year the SEC implemented a rule limiting its teams to 28 signees between Signing Day and May 31. The rule, now adopted by the NCAA, isn’t being strictly enforced. One reason schools are circumventing the rule is the spacing of the two dates. Auburn signed 32 players last year because it brought in five players, including Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Cam Newton, in January. The Tigers had 27 players signed between February and May — one below the limit. According to a January Sports Illustrated report, LSU had to use more cutthroat methods in 2008. Coach Les Miles misjudged how many of his borderline academic qualifiers would become eligible. By summer’s end, Miles had to cut quarterback Chris Garrett because he had two more newcomers than available scholarships. He then had to tell signees Elliott Porter and Cameron Fordham — both of whom declined scholarship offers from other schools to accept Miles’ and LSU’s promise of playing football in Baton Rouge — that there wasn’t room for them. Porter had already moved into his dorm room and started classes when he received the news. The same report stated that eight of the 12 SEC schools had averaged 25 or more signees over the past five years. The website Oversigning.com, which chronicles the practice, lists six SEC schools projected to be over the scholarship limit following Signing Day. The leader of the clubhouse? Ole Miss, which has a projected 14 players over the limit. The website projects Ohio State, which is normally far from the oversigning hoopla, to be right at the 85-man limit following Signing Day. I love college football. I love the pageantry and the rivalries. I spend my Saturdays in the fall glued to the television. The sport dominates my life for a little more than three months. But this practice is bad belly fat on the sport. The presidents and athletic directors of every school around the country — not just those in the SEC — need to step up, show some accountability and actually police the guilty coaches. Whether it’s stricter NCAA laws or a shake weight for SEC schools, something has to be done. read more

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Football Nick Bosa will not play against Tulane

Ohio State redshirt sophomore linebacker Tuf Borland (32) and junior defensive end Nick Bosa (97) run toward the ball in the first quarter of the game against TCU on Sept. 15. Ohio State won 40-28. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorIn the middle of a press conference focused on his suspension and domestic violence allegations made against former wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator Zach Smith, Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer said Monday that junior defensive end Nick Bosa will not play in Saturday’s game against Tulane. Meyer said that the defensive end had suffered an abdominal and groin issue in the Buckeyes’ 40-28 win over No. 15 TCU on Saturday, leaving the game in the third quarter and not returning for the remainder of the game. In the win over the Horned Frogs, Bosa recorded five tackles, including a strip sack recovered by redshirt junior Davon Hamilton in the end zone for the first Ohio State score of the game. Meyer said Bosa will undergo further tests this week. No. 4 Ohio State will face Tulane at Ohio Stadium at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday. read more

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Lacazette could play at number 10 – Bould

first_imgArsenal’s assistant manager Steve Bould discussed the potential new role in the team for Alexandre Lacazette ahead of his return against Stoke City after he was out due to a knee injury.It is not clear yet whether Lacazette will be a part of the starting lineup as he is a direct competitor for the right to lead the attack to Arsenal’s winter transfer window signing Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang.“He’s actually a very, very, very good football player. He could play at number 10 – he’s really good,” Bould shared, according to Football.London.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“He’s not just a goalscorer, he’s not an out-and-out striker, he can play.”“The physical element has surprised him and caught up with him, which it does to many players who come from abroad. We’re hoping he comes back sharp.”“This little break might have done him the world of good actually. The Premier League is absolutely different compared to the French league,” Bould went on to add, addressing the break Lacazette took, due to injury.last_img read more

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Messi names the 8 players that could star in the World

first_imgNaturally, Lionel Messi is expected to be one of the main stars in the World Cup but the Argentine has now revealed that he is predicting EIGHT other players to shine in RussiaThe 2018 World Cup looks set to be an unbelievable tournament this summer with only six days remaining until the hosts Russia begin the tournament when they face Saudi Arabia in their Group A opener at the Luzhniki Stadium.Many experts and fans alike are expecting great things from both Messi and his long-time rival Cristiano Ronaldo at Russia as the duo chase their first World Cup titles in what may well be their final appearance in the tournament.But Messi believes that there are other stars set to shine in Russia.FC Barcelona, Valencia CFMatch Preview: Barcelona vs Valencia Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Is derby time in La Liga, as Barcelona welcomes Valencia to the Camp Nou Stadium tonight at 21:00 (CET).“Brazil have Ney and Philippe [Coutinho]. Spain have Andres Iniesta and Silva. Germany don’t have any one star but they are very solid,” said the 30-year-old, according to the Daily Mail.He added: “Belgium have [Eden] Hazard and [Kevin] De Bruyne. France have [Antoine] Griezmann and [Kylian] Mbappe. The tournament is full of very good players.”After having their final warm-up game against Israel cancelled, Argentina will now travel to Russia for their Group D opener against Iceland on June 16.last_img read more

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Player rejects World Cup medal

first_imgNikola Kalinic has rejected his silver medal after Croatia’s impressive display at this summer’s World Cup, according to Croatian media.The former Blackburn striker turned down the medal after he was disgracefully sent home from Russia 2018 just one game into the tournament.It’s believed the current AC Milan forward refused to come on as a substitute in his country’s opening 2-0 win over Nigeria due to a back problem, and was afterwards sent home by coach Zlatko Dalic.Dalic equally revealed Kalinic did the same in a World Cup friendly against Brazil and also during a training session.Cristiano Ronaldo, JuventusSerie A Betting: Match-day 3 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Considering there is a number of perfect starts so early in the Serie A season, as well as a few surprisingly not-so perfect ones….Kalinic reportedly said “thank you but I did not play in Russia.” despite the offer from his teammates, having not played in the competition.Croatia surpassed their World Cup record set in 1998 when they made their debut by topping Group D ahead of Argentina and went all the way to the finals.The former Yugoslavian side were the comeback kings of the tournament as they overturned the deficit thrice in the knockout stages to reach the finals, beating Denmark, Russia and England in the process.But in they fell short in the showpiece final, losing 4-2 to France at Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium with  goals coming from Perisic and Mandzukic in what ended up as consolation goal.last_img read more

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