Home » 2021 » January

Panel addresses euro crisis

first_imgThough the four scholars in Monday’s “Crisis of the Euro” panel discussion have differing disciplines, all agreed on one thing: the eurozone is in serious trouble. “Europe has often been the site of hope and good things, but has also often been the site of bad and troubling things,” sociology professor Robert Fishman said during the discussion held by the Nanovic Institute. “We’re again at a moment where Europe is the site of bad and troubling things.” Fishman said he believes the temporary solutions that have and will be put together to deal with this crisis will not be definitive. “There are many reasons why a definitive collapse of the euro is possible,” he said. “I’m not predicting it will happen, it will be very costly for Europeans and others if it does happen.” There is a huge difference between the cultures, identities and economies of the 17 European states that make up the eurozone. “Unemployment in Austria is 3.9 percent,” he said. “Unemployment is Spain is 22.6 percent.” Political science professor Sebastian Rosato said all of Europe’s problems with the euro stem from the fact that Europe is not a single state. “There is no chance that Europe will become a single state and this means that even if Europe rides out this crisis, there will be many more crises in the future,” he said. “And eventually, there will be a crisis big enough that the euro will collapse.” Rosato also said that because Europe is made up of different states, there are different types of fiscal needs. “If you have a one size fits all monetary policy, it’s going to be too tight for some states and too loose for other states,” he said. Political science professor Alexandra Guisinger said one of the problems with the euro is based in history. She said that the first time Europe pushed for a fixed exchange rate, or single currency like the euro, was in 1717. “It seems to me that even if the euro falls tomorrow, you can wait a few years and there will be another attempt [at a fixed exchange rate],” she said. One of the benefits for countries to have a fixed exchange rate is trade opens up. However, there are also huge downfalls, Guisinger said. “One of the things my research tells us is that there are some benefits to fixed exchange rates, and there are some definite costs,” she said. “One of the major costs that people recognize is that countries with a fixed exchange rate are far more likely to have a financial crises.” While the fixed exchange rate of the euro has had some short-term success, Guisinger said that Europeans would continue to pay for this fixed exchange rate in the long run. Finance professor Jeffrey Bergstrand said the eurozone is a centaur, like the half-man, half-horse creature from Greek mythology. “I draw that analogy because, we’re in a Greek crisis and I feel very much that is to think as the eurozone as a centaur,” he said. He went on to quote from an Economist article and said the eurozone is a hybrid, a single currency with 17 different national fiscal and economic policies. “The formal construct of the eurozone is the economic and monetary union,” he said. “One thing to keep in mind there is there is no mention of the word fiscal.” He said one of the largest problems facing the eurozone is fiscal policy. One of the requirements to belong to the eurozone is annual budget deficits cannot be more than three percent of the gross domestic product. However, the average deficit is currently four percent.last_img read more

Continue reading

Not your average talent show

first_imgLegends Nightclub on campus regularly hosts popular musical acts and entertainers, but an atypical group of performers took the stage March 26: Notre Dame professors. The First Year of Studies (FYS) and ND Ignite sponsored the “Professors Unplugged” talent show to allow members of Notre Dame’s faculty to showcase their unique talents and hobbies that occupy their time outside the classroom, ranging from music to athletics to comedy. The event also gave FYS students the opportunity to interact with their professors in a more informal setting.   The multitalented FYS Dean Hugh Page opened the show by reciting several of his original poems and closed the evening with a performance by his blues band.  Denise Della Rossa, associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in Notre Dame’s German program, shared her love of long-distance running with the audience. Sociology professor Eugene Halton demonstrated his harmonica skills for attendees, a talent cultivated since his years in graduate school at the University of Chicago. The professor-performers advised students to focus on their personal talents and passions instead of getting caught up in activities that garner recognition.  Page said students should prioritize exploration of their passions over packing their schedule with uninspiring activities. “I think what you have to do is find the courage to say no to some things, so you can say yes to yourself,” he said.last_img read more

Continue reading

Former ND VP dies at age 89

first_imgJames W. Frick, former University vice president for public relations, alumni affairs and development, died Wednesday at the age of 89 at his home in Naples, Fla., according to a University press release.Frick enrolled at Notre Dame as a 23-year-old freshman after serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He worked part time for the University development office, then called the Notre Dame Foundation, before graduating and entering full-time into the foundation, the press release stated.Frick became the first Notre Dame administrator to focus exclusively on development work, and he later became the University’s director of development in 1961. In 1965 he was elected vice president for public relations and development as the first lay officer in University history, according to the press release.“Jim Frick took over a fledgling development organization and turned it into one of the most successful fundraising operations in the nation,” University president emeritus Fr. Theodore M. Hesburgh said, according to the press release. “Few individuals have left the University more in their debt than he, and few have had a more decisive and widespread effect on the history and development of Notre Dame.”Frick served for 18 years as vice president, during which time Notre Dame initiated four major fundraising campaigns that generated more than $300 million, according to the press release.“Frick’s twin enthusiasms — for his job and for his alma mater — could be costly,” the press release stated. “A nearly compulsive record keeper, he once noticed and remarked that in 1976, a particularly eventful year of his tenure, he spent 36 weeks traveling 70,000 miles and ate 263 dinners away from home.“Such exertions contributed to several heart attacks, two of them nearly fatal, and were noted officially in 1983 when the University conferred on Frick an honorary degree citing ‘a man who has literally worked his heart out for Notre Dame.’”Frick earned a doctoral degree in educational administration from the University in 1972 and, upon retirement as vice president, served on the board of trustees from 1983 to 1985, the press release stated.A funeral Mass will be celebrated Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. Visitation will be held Tuesday from 2-4:30 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to Notre Dame Magazine, the Notre Dame Annual Fund or the Community Foundation of St. Joseph County.Tags: Vice Presidentlast_img read more

Continue reading

Saint Mary’s conducts post-graduation survey

first_imgErin Rice The Saint Mary’s Office of Institutional Research conducted the annual “Graduation Destination Survey” to find out what students are doing after graduation.According to the survey, of the 320 women in the class of 2015, 274 responded for a response rate of 85.6 percent.The data showed that 52.6 percent of the class of 2015 will enter the work force, 26.6 percent will go on to graduate school, 10.1 percent will participate in externships and internships, and 6.1 percent have committed to voluntary service.Director of Career Crossings Stacie Jeffirs said compared to last year’s survey, the number of students pursuing voluntary service is just about the same. She said the number was 6.1 percent this year and 6.8 percent last year, which is the equivalent of about a two-student difference.The results showed that 4.3 percent answered “other” to the survey. Jeffirs said the other category includes fellowships, continuing at Notre Dame to obtain an engineering degree, starting a business or entrepreneurship and other plans.The survey revealed less than .5 percent will go on to military service.Jeffirs said the survey data is representative of Saint Mary’s mission.“The College prepares students to go out and pursue wherever their passions may lie, whether this is a workplace setting through employment or post-grad internships/externships, graduate/professional school, military service or voluntary service,” Jeffirs said.After graduating, senior Marissa Pié will work at Southwest Airlines corporate headquarters in Dallas, Texas. Pié interned with Southwest last summer.“I’ve accepted a job in the marketing department on the Customer Segment and Engagement team,” Pié said. “After such an incredible internship experience with the company, I could not be more excited to get to work.”Pié said Saint Mary’s has gone above and beyond in terms of preparing her for the workforce.“It was at Saint Mary’s that I discovered my confidence, learned how to effectively communicate and maintain relationships and pushed myself to reach my full potential,” she said.Before Saint Mary’s, Pié said she lacked self-confidence and was afraid to speak her mind.“Saint Mary’s has equipped me not only with technical and professional knowledge, but a sense of self-assurance that I am sure will transcend into the workplace,” she said. “Receiving a liberal arts education pushed me, but also made me realize I could do anything with a little bit of hard work.”Pié said professors at Saint Mary’s have become friends and confidants. The whole college community supports and encourages growth of students, she said.“Everyone here wants you to succeed and will go that extra mile in order for that to happen,” she said. “Additionally, Saint Mary’s taught me the importance of taking risks and leaving my comfort zone. After returning from a semester abroad in Seville, Spain as a mere sophomore, I could tell my perspective and world view would be forever changed.”Tags: Commencement 2015, Graduation destination survey, Office of Institutional Research, saint mary’slast_img read more

Continue reading

Lyons rector, president discuss community, events

first_imgSince 1927, Lyons Hall has been standing proudly as part of the “Golden Coast” on South Quad, alongside Morrissey Manor and Howard Hall. Originally established as a men’s honors dorm, Lyons was converted into a female dorm in 1974 and has been home to decades of Notre Dame women ever since. Lyons Hall is named after Joseph Lyons, a professor of English at Notre Dame in the late nineteenth century. Residents, or “Lyonites,” take pride in their iconic arch — one of the more notable pieces of Notre Dame dorm architecture. Lyons Hall is also the only residence hall to be featured in the movie “Rudy.”Rector Sarah Heiman said Lyons is also one of only two dorms on Notre Dame’s campus to have faculty-in-residence: professor Ed Hums and his wife, Shirley. Lyons Hall hosts several signature events to raise money for charitable causes, sophomore and hall president Courtney Sauder said. “Our first [event] is our Volley for the Vets, which is a signature event that we do with Carroll,” Sauder said. “We have a volleyball competition. You have to pay to do it and the money goes to veterans.” Lyons also sponsors the Mara Fox Run, which is a 5K run honoring a Lyons resident who was killed by a drunk driver. Funds from the race contribute to a scholarship for students studying abroad in Spain.“It’s a really important run,” Sauder said. “We are trying to do more with it this year since it is going to be our final year doing it. We are going to retire [the event] after 25 years.”Lyons also puts on Laugh with Lyons, during which residents assemble pranks and deliver them across campus, and Recess with O’Neill Family Hall on the last day of classes.When asked about her favorite part of living in Lyons, Sauder said the people in Lyons are what makes the dorm experience special. “My favorite thing [about Lyons] is the community, right off the bat,” Sauder said. ”I made some of the best friends that I’ve ever had. Everyone is really supportive, and we won the most supportive community last year. … I felt so loved and accepted, and that’s why I wanted to be president, so I could help people feel the same way that I did.”Heiman echoed Sauder’s sentiment, emphasizing the way that the Lyons community comes together each Sunday for mass. “There’s so many great things about Lyons, but one of my favorites most people don’t know about is that we sing the Hail Mary together at the end of each Sunday Mass,” Heiman said in an email. “When the lights turn down and we begin to sing it’s a very calming and prayerful moment.”Ultimately, the Lyons community seeks to build connections between the dorm’s residents, Sauder said.“We don’t have a lot of pressure to just be hall of the year,” she said. “The truth is, we’ve never won it. I’m going to try to make that happen, but it’s never one of our priorities because we’re not trying to get a trophy. We’re just trying to build our community.”Tags: dorm, dorm community, dorm features, Lyons Halllast_img read more

Continue reading

Poet Laureate discusses writing process

first_imgIn much of her poetry, current Poet Laureate of the United States Tracy K. Smith allows her writing to be driven by her answers to questions such as, “Why do I care about [this topic]?” It is through this journey of sitting with a single question or phase that she finds other feelings and connections coming to the surface, a journey that she discussed Wednesday ahead of her appearance at this year’s Christian Culture Lecture. “The poem ‘Wade in the Water’ begins with this experience that felt so beautiful, and then I thought, ‘Why did I care about it? Because it made me feel a kind of pang. Why did it make me feel that way? Because love isn’t what we live by, love isn’t what I feel like I deserve to get from a stranger,’” Smith said. “And then just surrendering to that memory of that experience allowed other things to rise up.” This process led Smith to bring in elements of history to the poem, which is a theme present in much of her recent release “Wade in the Water.” Smith said in her writing, she finds value in trying to find ways to make the poem give the same experience to readers as she felt writing it. “I feel like if I’m trying to surprise a reader, then I’m not going to do that,” Smith said. “But if I’m trying to allow myself to be surprised then that’s possible, and if I can after get to that place, revise the poem so that it speaks clearly and viscerally to a reader then maybe I can trust the reader will go through the same series of realizations or discoveries.”This practice of “surprising herself” and leading readers through the same experience comes from looking at things from several angles, Smith said. “It happens by, you know, making those connections between things that don’t necessarily belong together,” Smith said. “It happens by looking from a perspective that I wouldn’t think to look from in real time, but because I have the luxury of writing a poem — sort of stopping time — I can move around within the scene and look for something that seems useful in sort of changing my view of things.”This idea of changing one’s view and challenging one’s perspectives is central to Smith’s view on the power of poetry, she said. “What I think one of our major shortcomings as 21st century, social media, immediate culture beings is we trust our own opinions, our own reactions, and we feel like we have the right to explain other people to themselves to speak for them or to speak over them,” Smith said. “And a poem is this great device because it says, ‘No, no, no, no, no, no. You have to be quiet, you have to listen, you don’t know me, you haven’t had these experiences but I will share them with you, if you can, put away your expectations and your assumptions and allow me to guide you through a new way of looking at experience and a new way of looking at the world.’“It’s exciting as a reader to be gifted with different ways of thinking about the world that I think I know, but it’s also I think essential for a more compassionate citizenship to imagine that other people’s voices matter as much as our own, and that by listening we might be able to get past certain misconceptions or erroneous expectations that we have been taught are okay.”As Poet Laureate of the U.S., Smith was given a fund that she could use to further a mission of her choice. Part of Smith’s mission is to take poetry to parts of the country that would not typically get a visit from a poet. Smith said she hopes to share her love of poetry with these communities, without the pressure of teaching.“Part of this project of going into rural communities has to do with just wanting to even in this small way mend or bridge the divide that we imagine between rural and urban perspectives and lifestyles and vocabularies for experience,” Smith said. “And teaching I don’t think is the way to do that. The way to do that I think is to go in and say, ‘Hey, we’re two people, or we’re a room full of people, we’re in the presence of this voice on the page, let’s talk about what it seems to be saying.’”Smith said while she has looked forward to hearing the observations readers have made about her poems, she did not want to create anxiety due to putting attendees in the position of demonstrating a deeper understanding of poems. Instead, she feels their natural interactions with poems can be just as powerful. “I really believe that a person can have a powerful and useful encounter with a poem simply by noticing what the poem makes him or her feel, allowing the mind to wander and making connections between where the poem is speaking from and where the mind goes and accepting that those might be useful and even purposeful associations,” she said.Smith also discussed the challenges that female authors have had in the world of poetry. While Smith said the challenges each individual faces is different, there are acts such as finding a sense of community that can help. Within the works of female poets, there are some similarities that are present that differentiate them from male writers, Smith said. “I really feel that there’s something that characterizes work by women that is different from men,” Smith said. “Now, that’s a sweeping statement and so it’s wrong to say that in many ways, but some things feel really true for me. I love the way that there is a willingness to listen and to be beholden to the environment, to the voices of others, to a sense of place that could move and shape a female speaker. … It’s not necessarily the urge to claim and imprint so much as to observe, detect, hear something that may be audible only if you are doing the work to seek it out.” Smith also said women writers explore multiple aspects of the self, in a way that she hopes she does in her work. “There’s also, of course, a really wonderful tradition of speaking to the quiet rage that is a part of being a woman, thinking of a poet like [Sylvia] Plath. Or … the amazing balance between a really active mind and a raging heart and spirit,” Smith said. “I love that at least the women poets that have meant something to me have been fearless in engaging both of those parts of the self, poems that seem to be really an act of listening and learning which is what I like to believe my poems help me to do.”Tags: Christian Culture Lecture, poet laureate, tracy k. smithlast_img read more

Continue reading

South Bend bounces back from spike in cases, adjusts to new reality of pandemic

first_imgCourtesy of Nancy Diaz One volunteer works with two kids at La Casa de Amistad, a local organization that serves the Hispanic and Latino community of South Bend. Here, the volunteer and kids are wearing masks to ensure safety.Diaz said despite the barriers to helping physically within the community, people can still donate and educate themselves on the inequities in the community which have been highlighted by the pandemic.“While the news may display high levels of COVID cases within Black and Latino populations, do not be quick to blame the people affected, rather, investigate the systems around them that allow this to happen,” Diaz said.Tags: College Mentors for Kids, coronavirus, La Casa de Amistad, South Bend Latino community, south bend schools, St. Joseph County South Bend Latino community feels the impacts of pandemic COVID-19 has not only impacted the whole county but has also more heavily impacted minorities.Nancy Diaz works as a youth programs assistant at La Casa de Amistad, a not-for-profit charitable organization serving the Hispanic/Latino community in South Bend where students in the tri-campus community volunteer. She said the pandemic has affected the South Bend Latino community in several ways.“I’ve seen it disrupt children’s education significantly, and early in the pandemic, it highlighted workplace inequalities in factories and other settings where Latino people make up the majority of the workforce, because these have been sites of outbreaks due to lack of employer-supplied protective equipment and policies,” Diaz said in an email.Diaz said the organization has not been able to return to normal programming but has been able to still have limited numbers of volunteers.“Since we’ve had to scale back the number of people we serve, we’ve also scaled back the number of volunteers we have,” Diaz said. As college students in the tri-campus community made their return to campus in late July and early August, St. Joseph County was already seeing an uptick in the number of daily coronavirus counts compared to the month of June.“At the end of June, [St. Joseph County] was averaging 15 new cases a day,” Dr. Mark Fox, St. Joseph County deputy health officer, said. “We were actually feeling pretty good about [this]. Then there were Fourth of July and graduation parties and different things like that, and the number went up.”On July 18, the county saw 59 new cases.Then, the tri-campus community returned to in-person classes the week of Aug. 10. Students were required to have a pre-matriculation test with a negative result before returning to campus. Notre Dame reported only 33 positive cases while Saint Mary’s reported 4.By Aug. 18 — eight days into the semester — Notre Dame had reported a total of 147 cases and announced a two-week shutdown to halt the alarming rise in cases.Fox, an advisor to the University on COVID-19 matters, said the county was averaging around 108 cases per day when Notre Dame experienced its uptick in cases. He said he and his colleagues thought this was “worrisome.”The trend for the number of new cases per day then decreased for Notre Dame and St. Joseph County as a whole. As of Monday, the county had a seven-day moving average of 43 cases, and Notre Dame reported a moving average of 6 per day.“Certainly my impression is that the county as a whole is improving as well, so I’m cautiously optimistic that we’re headed in the right direction,” Fox said.While Notre Dame has largely been using rapid antigen testing, Fox said the majority of coronavirus tests in the rest of the county are PCR tests, with results coming back two days or later. Fox said he thinks the county is supplying “reasonable access” to a test.“The rest of the county has pretty poor access to rapid testing, but in general, I think people who people who need a test, and even people who just want to test, are able to get that done,” Fox said.center_img Local K-12 schools face difficult decisions on returning to schoolThe rise in coronavirus cases has also stalled the return to in-person instruction for local schools.Fox said the county needed to reach a lower threshold before returning to school, leading to anxiety among those in the K-12 community; the rise in cases at Notre Dame affected this decision.“Obviously, no one expected the volume of cases of Notre Dame experienced,” Fox said.On Sept. 3, the state of Indiana released a report on its recommendations to school and local officials on plans regarding online and in-person instruction. The recommendations were based on two metrics: the number of new cases in the past week per 100,000 residents and the percent positivity rate.The report grouped counties in the state by color based on the two metrics. St. Joseph County was placed into the orange grouping, indicating moderate to high community spread. The report recommended schools in orange counties to implement hybrid learning for middle and high schools while continuing in-person instruction for grade school students.Yet, some schools in the county have chosen to wait to return to the physical classroom for all students. The South Bend Community School Corporation (SBCSC) board of trustees announced Aug. 4 that the school corporation would start the academic year with at least eight weeks of online learning.“The soonest students would return in person to classrooms is Oct. 5,” Superintendent Todd Cummings said in the release. “However, any decisions we make at that time will be based on health department data.”The release said conversations would occur in mid-September to gauge the possibility of returning to in-person learning.Michelle Conway, a second-grade teacher at Kennedy Academy, an SBCSC school for kindergarten through fifth grade, said her students have both synchronous and asynchronous learning to complete during the school day.“I might teach a lesson and then send them off to do something independently, and then they come back later for another subject. So we do that a couple times a day,” Conway said.Conway said it is “strange” only seeing her kids through a screen every day, and she would feel comfortable returning to in-person instruction later in the fall, but would still harbor worries in the back of her mind.“I think they have things in place that would make it safe, but you never know until you try,” Conway said.Fox said evidence that the virus has not spread heavily in the classroom at Notre Dame is a good sign for local schools.“It gives hope that the K through 12 schools can conduct class and not significantly increase the risk of transmission of the virus,” Fox said.The limits on schools and extracurricular activities have also limited the exposure of Notre Dame students to kids in the South Bend community.Sophomore Elizabeth Heffernan, co-vice president of College Mentors for Kids, said the club typically invites students in grades one through six to campus to participate in activities surrounding high education and community outreach.This year, Heffernan said the club has tentative plans to host 30-60 minute sessions with their “little buddies” over Zoom, and is currently waiting to receive the green light from SAO. However, she said she worries about the engagement between mentors and buddies in this virtual setting.“Our activities obviously cannot be as hands-on as usual, so keeping the 1st-6th grade buddies engaged will be a challenge, especially when they are in their home environment with distractions and after a long school day that might be virtual, too,” Heffernan said in a text message.If the club is able to host activities, Heffernan said she is excited for new relationships to be built and other relationships to be expanded upon within the club.“The relationships can be a really positive impact in the little buddies’ lives and really meaningful for the mentors, too,” Heffernan said.last_img read more

Continue reading

Virtual NFL Draft Begins Today

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: NFLNEW YORK – The 2020 NFL Draft starts Thursday, and this year’s event looks a little different.It was supposed to be a big spectacle in Las Vegas, but with COVID-19, the entire draft is being held virtually.All 32 teams and league personnel will be operating remotely with nearly 60 prospects are also participating virtually.This year’s event is also serving as a fundraiser for six charities providing coronavirus relief efforts. Football fans can still watch it on ESPN, ABC, and the NFL Network. The draft ends on Saturday.last_img

Continue reading

Chautauqua County Officials Report New COVID-19 Case On Wednesday

first_imgWNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County Officials reported one new case of COVID-19 Wednesday.Officials say the new case involves a woman in her 50s.There are now 38 confirmed cases, 3 active cases, 31 recovered cases and 4 deaths. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

Continue reading

Seven Charged In Jamestown Drug Trafficking Ring

first_imgCredit Huffington PostBUFFALO – Seven people are facing charges for allegedly trafficking drugs in Jamestown last year.The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Buffalo allege Rocco A. Beardsley, Tyler N. Tedesco, Miller Hagga, Kylie M. Reeves, Garland Beardsley, and Austin Gordon, worked together in a drug trafficking ring led by Beardsley from 2018 to 2020.Police say the ring sold methamphetamine, heroin, fentanyl, acetyl fentanyl, cocaine, crack cocaine, and hydrocodone between December 2018 and October 27. The defendants are also accused of selling the illegal substances to a person under 21 and a pregnant woman.The illegal organization, prosecutors say, utilized residences at 12 Bishop Street, 631 Newland, 711 Newland, 158 Sampson Street, and 20 W. Cowden Place to manufacture and distribute drugs. Beardsley is also charged with engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, conspiracy to commit money laundering, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of his drug trafficking activities. All six defendants face up to life in prison if convicted.In addition, a seventh defendant, Giselle Bennett is charged with obstruction of justice. The indictment states that in October 2019, in testimony before the grand jury, Bennett concealed information regarding the drug use of an individual identified as J.A., the circumstances of J.A. and defendant Bennett’s acquisition of narcotics, and the circumstances surrounding a visit by defendant Rocco Beardsley to J.A.’s residence shared with defendant Bennett. She faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted.The defendants were arraigned before U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael J. Roemer. Defendants Rocco Beardsley, Tedesco, Hagga, Reeves, Gordon, and Bennett were detained. Defendant Garland Beardsley was released on conditions.The plea is the result of an investigation by the Jamestown Police Department and the Jamestown Metro Drug Task Force, the Drug Enforcement Administration, New York Field Division, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Continue reading