Rugby Book Review – Behind the Thistle

first_imgThe Scottish team pose for a photograph before the Five Nations Championship match against England…You always sensed that Scottish rugby was the most true-blue amateur of all, and this weighty book of nearly 500 pages does nothing to disaffirm that view. The authors interview dozens of Scotland players from every post-war decade, and the mild surprise of crazy selections and slowness to develop on-field ‘moves’ gives way to amazement when Peter Brown reveals that on the eve of one 1960s Test in Wales, the selectors returned drunk from a dinner and tipped the players out of their beds at 2.30am!The tale of Peter Stagg’s attempt to claim a copy of Playboy on expenses is one of many that will raise a chuckle, but the book’s two undoubted funnymen are Ian Barnes – one of whose tales is told in The Last Word overleaf – and Jim Renwick, who was merciless to struggling team-mates. For example, when Doug Morgan missed a sitter that would have beaten England in 1975, Renwick quipped: “Hell, Dougie, I could have back-heeled a chest of drawers over from there.”What gives this exhaustive account of 60-odd years of Scottish rugby a sharper edge are the more serious reflections. The brutality of touring in Argentina, and the grinding poverty in Romania, where a hungry waitress licked a discarded chocolate wrapper, is sobering stuff; John Beattie admits he lost concentration at times in Test matches because he couldn’t quite believe where he was; while Donnie Macfadyen’s plea for support structures for former pros is a reminder that pro rugby is in its infancy. Great read, if loosely subbed.RW RATING 4/5BUY IT AT:  birlinn.co.uk RRP:  £20   PUBLISHED BY:  Birlinn Got a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the February 2011 issue of Rugby World MagazineDo you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipc TAGS: Book Review LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.last_img read more

Continue reading

Daily news from New Zealand – 11 September – Video

Rugby Legend and New Zealand hero – Sir Brian LochoreThe Rugby World Cup 2011 official YouTube channel will be releasing daily videos to give you the chance to be part of the experience no matter where you are in the world. It allows you to follow the progress of the tournament, plus look at other things to do while in New Zealand.Today RWC Daily recaps the final three games from the opening weekend; Australia v Italy, Ireland v USA and defending champions, South Africa v Wales.Plus they talk to the only man to coach New Zealand to World Cup Glory – Sir Brian Lochore. He gives his insight into what New Zealand need to do to win the tournament… AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – AUGUST 10: Former New Zealand All Blacks Coach Sir Brian Lochore sits in the stands during a television interview at a reunion luncheon for members of the 1987 Rugby World Cup Champions All Blacks team at Eden Park on August 10, 2007 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Sandra Mu/Getty Images) 10 September |    9 September |    8 September |   7 September LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS read more

Continue reading

England help out at U13 festival

first_img England hooker Dyland Hartley training an U13 sideThe biting winds which swept across the playing fields of West Park Leeds fulfilled England Head Coach Stuart Lancaster’s hopes of Yorkshire creating a Murrayfield environment for his men, but that chill was obscured by the warmth that was generated by England’s involvement in an Under 13 festival involving eight teams and 96 youngsters from local clubs and schools.The England EPS squad were out in numbers at West Park for the session and the enthusiasm displayed by both sets of players on a challenging night underlined the value to the community and the squad of the initiative.“I thought the enthusiasm showed by the England players rubbed off on the youngsters and everything was positive,” said RFU Coach Development Manager John Lawn: “We had lots of good skills on show tonight, but also the interest in the visit of the England squad has been massive.“There has been huge interest not only across Yorkshire, but also from rugby right across the North. There is certainly a massive demand for us to see them again.”Dylan Hartley confirmed the enjoyment that the players had experienced. “It’s been very entertaining and it’s great to see the kids enjoying themselves so much. It’s been very cold, but they’re all in good spirits.“The new Shaping the Game rules are a bit different, but they seemed to create more space and resulted in everyone passing the ball more. LEEDS, ENGLAND – JANUARY 26: England player Dylan Hartley speaks to the players as England take time out of their Six nations preperations to coach teams during an Under-13 Rugby competition at West Park Leeds RFC on January 26, 2012 in Leeds, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) The full England squad will be on parade tomorrow when invited representatives of clubs and schools attend a training session on Friday morning at Leeds University’s handsome Weetwood headquarters.Bramley Phoenix, Leodiensians/Yarnbury, Moortown, Otley, Roundhegians, Morley, West Park Leeds and Wetherby supplied the players who enjoyed this rare opportunity to get hands-on coaching from their England heroes. “In terms of the buzz it created among the England lads, I was running around like I was playing the game. When I pitched up today, a met my Wetherby team and asked them who they wanted as their coach. They all said Tuilagi!“Having 20 of the 32 lads here today is pretty good and of course there was a competitive element between us ahead of the festival which added to the enjoyment.”Players from 33 schools in the Leeds and surrounding area were involved in eight club teams and the enthusiasm among the parents who attended was summed up by Otley Under 13 coach Same Waddington, who said: “I think the whole project has been fantastic. I can’t believe how excited the lads have been for a fortnight and what an impact Stuart’s decision has made. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Continue reading

Lions 2013: The first Test is here and nothing prepares you for it

first_imgBRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – JUNE 21: Israel Folau of the Wallabies takes a high ball during an Australian Wallabies Captain’s Run at Suncorp Stadium on June 21, 2013 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Another unknown entity: Israel FolauGood planning means deciding – in truth, most times this is gambling – on a scheme to beat the opposition, but paying reverence to their abilities. It is ignorant to assume that Australia will be weak, particularly as they have Will Genia pulling strings, a back-row with the ability to steal lots of ball, an unknown quantity at 12 and an internationally experienced front-row of Benn Robinson, Stephen Moore and Ben Alexander who will have hit every single practice scrum together.Opposite Australia is a front-row where Alex Corbisiero and Tom Youngs have never played together before, a back-row built for running forward towards rucks and a bench that caters for several different tactical options.None of this is to say that the Lions are not well prepared or that Australia must be favourites. It is just that set out, one against the other, this Test is one full of variable and is not as easy as turning up having put in some time and romping home. Revision time is over: Sam Warburton is ready for his first Test against the Wallabies as Lions captain, at SuncorpBy Alan DymockMOVIES ABOUT sports invariably get it wrong. It’s the montage. Athletes are shown muddied and broken, scuttling around performing seemingly impossible tasks over and over until the actions actually become easy.At the sharp end of sport, though, it never gets easy.Who’s ready for the Wallabies?: the Lions pre-Test trainingIf someone is enjoying the hard work or finishing foundation sessions with comfort then that individual is not preparing for true tests.  Do not misinterpret this as saying players should be flogged constantly – proper preparation encompasses factoring in rest, gentle pre-match sessions and time to switch off, though concentration levels must be high at the right times because that’s just good planning – but a British and Irish Lions match against the Wallabies is not only a Test; it is an exorcise in pushing yourself beyond your limits in order to overturn monstrous odds, a pitiless schedule and the demands of four nations and one expectant hemisphere where your opposition lives.On Friday night, Sydney local time, Ian McGeechan presented the Lions with their match jerseys. As a player he has won in South Africa in 1974 and lost it in New Zealand in 1977. He has been head coach of the Lions a system-shocking four times, winning in Australia in 1989, losing in New Zealand in 1993, winning in South Africa in 1997 and losing in South Africa in 2009. He was also a midweek coach on the disastrous tour of New Zealand in 2005. Put plainly, he understands sacrifice and dedication when it comes to touring.Undoubtedly he will have gotten his message across. It will have been a simple message. One about what it takes to win. As the game kicks off it is not just a case of blood and thunder, or destiny being realised, or Everest being scaled, or butterflies turning into Lions, or wounded animals biting back, or any other cliché playing out; it is a case of taking everything, including the unconquerable training, and using it to best an adversary for one little bit. It is just the first Test of three and it will not be easy.It will be unmissable, though.last_img read more

Continue reading

Analysis: Carl Fearns’ bench impact for Bath

first_img In every title-winning campaign there is an unsung hero, a player who is largely unheralded yet integral to success.For Bath this year, the under-the-radar star has been Carl Fearns. Though he can only boast seven starts across the season, coming off the bench in 12 more matches, his club might be in trouble without his immense impact.Following a 47-10 thrashing of Leicester, Mike Ford‘s men stand 80 minutes away from translating promise and eye-catching performances into Premiership glory.At Twickenham against Saracens, who pride themselves on relentless tenacity and work-rate, Fearns’ controlled menace could prove pivotal. The tie is being billed as Bath’s sparkling attack clashing with immovable defence. Even so the likes of George Ford and Jonathan Joseph will be snuffed out without some initial go-forward.While his hallmarks is raw intensity, Fearns is also an authoritative figure that reads the game accurately. He turns 26 this week but seems far older, both in appearance and nous.When Fearns took the field on Saturday shortly before the hour-mark, Bath looked to have realised what they were about to achieve – and were utterly terrified.Though they were 21-10 ahead, their set-piece had gone to custard opposite the outstanding Tigers front row and some iffy decision-making was creeping in. In fact, from Ford’s kick-off to begin the second half – which sailed out on the full – through to the 56th minute, Bath temporarily misplaced their mojo amid the significance of the occasion.The 11 seasons since their previous final outing were weighing heavy, oppressively so. Given Leicester’s know-how, this was always the danger.Assessing the situationThe below pattern from a lineout demonstrated how Bath’s instincts were perhaps being stunted:Ford’s high ball resulted in a scrum to Bath, but the reluctance to keep the ball in hand and trust their phase-play is odd, especially given the penetration of their earlier attacks.Back to a full complement of 15 players following the return of Anthony Watson and Leroy Houston from the sin-bin, there is no excuse. In the event, Leicester won the ensuing set-piece against the head anyway, and could assert pressure for a decent period of possession.Then Fearns replaced Houston and went to work. Notice that he makes a beeline for Ford on taking the field:There is always a bit of guess-work involved in lip-reading, but it appears as though Fearns is relaying a message and mouths the word ‘play’, which would absolutely make sense.Afterwards, Mike Ford spoke of how Bath lapsed into some aimless rugby either side of half-time. At this point, they needed to reverse Tigers’ building momentum, so keeping the ball and challenging the Leicester line was essential.Hands to the pumpFirst though, some defending needed to be done. Fearns threw himself into the job at hand, making this excellent hit on Jamie Gibson:Speeding up as Ben Youngs probes around the fringes and is stopped by Matt Garvey, he first blocks any pass to either Ed Slater or Dan Cole:The Tiger scrum-half does manage to link with Gibson. However, Fearns readjusts and buries his man:Two phases later, Leicester cough up. Fearns, who has got back onto his feet and into the game, has an important, if subtle role:Nick Auterac makes the hit on Christian Loamanu that forces the ball loose and Garvey collects. Fearns is hovering close by and notices Julian Salvi move in:He immediately clears out the Australian before the ball can be threatened:Leicester were so persistent, and kept coming at Bath in wave after wave. As ever, Tom Youngs was a willing carrier. Here, he is stopped by Fearns and Garvey:Notice how the tacklers retain their balance and make Leicester move them from the contact area:Their presence means the ruck is slow. Even more crucially, as Fearns is not put on the floor, he can sweep around and contribute to the defensive effort:Though Vereniki Goneva stretches Kyle Eastmond and Joseph, the industry pays off when Cole tries to trundle around the fringe:Fearns comes back into shot as fellow replacement Rob Webber downs Cole……before getting over the ball amid the attentions of Mat Tait:Brad Thorn and Marcos Ayerza shunt Fearns away, but that only leaves Joseph free to latch on and encourage referee JP Doyle to award the penalty for holding on: Trucking up: Carl Fearns takes it to the line against Leicester Tigers From there, Bath could get out of their own half. Winning another penalty soon afterwards, they kicked for touch and won a lineout in a strong position.Blowing it openThough a catch-and-drive derailed, Fearns grabbed the attack by the scruff and instigated a match-winning score:All season he has been a domineering force on the gain-line. His footwork to unbalance Slater, explosive power and deft offload to Francois Louw – who in turn puts away Peter Stringer – is exceptional.Here is a closer angle:Precisely five minutes later, Fearns lit the touch paper again, this time from a scrum:Bath were battered by Cole and Ayerza for most of the afternoon. In this instance though, Fearns tears away from the base before too much pressure can come through.His pace is impressive and his timing of pass perfect, tying in both Slater and Freddie Burns before releasing Ford:Staying in the game once more – a feature of this performance – Fearns followed up to clear Slater from the ensuing ruck after Semesa Rokoduguni takes it in:Bath move left into midfield, finding fluency at last, and then bounce back right to devastating effect:Fearns does not touch the ball in this decisive phase. Still, his presence holds Slater while Gibson must look after the fringes. Ford can isolate Goneva and free Rokoduguni:Fire and iceBy deploying Fearns on the bench, Mike Ford ensured 24 minutes of massive energy. Indeed, the back-rower was effervescent. At the restart after Ford’s try, he was on the scene.A burly tackle topples Salvi before Fearns gets to his feet and makes a nuisance of himself at the ruck, sending a boot through the breakdown to disrupt Leicester’s ball:Eventually, from a cohesive kick-chase, Bath did overturn possession. They were then deadly:Many forwards panic and flounder when they found themselves in midfield. Not Fearns. Played in by Joseph, he stays calm.Realising that such a vast expanse of space would be best exploited by someone quicker than he, there is a straightforward transfer to Watson:The conversion puts Bath 40-10 up and the courageous Tigers crack. Dave Attwood careers upfield. Fearns is hungry for even more work:This carry comes to nothing when Ford aims an audacious chip into the dead-ball area.Soon enough though, with Leicester trying to spark something from deep, Fearns is involved:A turnover-inducing challenge epitomised how Fearns turned the tables in terms of physicality. Though the ball has gone past him to the left, he keeps pressing:When Salvi cuts back, he is taken low by Dominic Day and Garvey. Fearns steps in, targets the ball and clobbers his opponent around the sternum:Given half a chance, Bath ended on a fittingly clinical note, Ollie Devoto assisting Watson:So ended the semi-final, capping a hugely influential effort from Fearns that truly swung the outcome towards Bath.Sam Burgess has started the past five Premiership matches at blindside flanker. At a raucous Rec, Fearns could not have put together a more compelling case to wear the number six shirt against Saracens in the season decider.The ball is in Mike Ford court. He has a potentially crucial call to make. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Carl Fearns has enjoyed an excellent season for Bath and made a match-clinching cameo from the bench in Saturday’s semi-final against Leicester Tigers TAGS: Highlight Thanks to BT Sport and Premiership Rugby for the match footage. You can purchase tickets to the Aviva Premiership final at Twickenham here.last_img read more

Continue reading

Downtime with… Scotland fly-half Finn Russell

first_imgWhat’s the silliest thing you’ve ever bought? Probably my Wattbike because I never use it! People would probably see a lot of what I buy as silly because it’s expensive, but it’s not silly to me.If your house was on fire, what’s the one thing you’d save (people and pets are safe)? The Supreme motorbike I bought when I shared a flat in Glasgow with Ali Price. It’s cool and stylish. I don’t have much that’s sentimentally valuable in Paris, but I’d probably grab my PS5!Who would be your three dream dinner party guests? Rihanna looks like good fun, and Conor McGregor would be a real laugh too. If I’m allowed to pick someone who’s no longer with us, I’ll go for Maradona. He’d have loads of good stories and then it could turn a bit wild.The best advice you’ve ever received? Half the advice I receive goes in one ear and out the other! The thing that’s most stuck with me is just to be yourself, be happy and enjoy yourself. Be you and don’t try to change.What’s your guilty pleasure? I play PlayStation a lot but I don’t feel guilty about it! I love sweets but I’m trying to ease back. The same goes for French baguettes. I’ve been here three years and I’ve had comfortably enough to last a lifetime.What would be your Mastermind specialist subject? Cars or sport, although I don’t know anywhere near as many random facts about the latter as someone like Ali or Mike Blair.Any hidden talents? My whole family can juggle. Me, my dad Keith and younger brother Archie can do it with fire as well. What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? I’m designing an app at the moment to do with photography, so hopefully that will be successful.How’d you like to be remembered?As a real serious guy who never had fun at the weekend. Nah, joking aside, I’d want to be remembered as a guy who enjoyed playing rugby. Who played at a really high level but had good fun doing it. Who wasn’t too serious, didn’t go about shouting at folk or having a go at them. A guy who was dead relaxed but could turn it on when he had to. Scotland fly-half Finn Russell prepares to kick for goal (SNS Group/Getty Images) Downtime with… Scotland fly-half Finn RussellWhat’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on a pitch?Alex Dunbar trying an up-and-under against Wales in 2015. I’d been sin-binned, so Alex slotted in at stand-off and attempted this kick that was meant for Tim Visser but went backwards 10m and straight out on the full. The best bit was Eck turning to Greig Laidlaw and trying to blame him, for reasons I’ve never quite been able to understand.Any practical jokes you can tell us? I’m still wondering if Stuart Hogg’s hair at the end of the Six Nations was a practical joke. Ryan Wilson and John Barclay used to give him frights, but he’s getting his own back on all of us with that wig.Stuart Hogg celebrates Scotland’s win over France in Paris (AFP/Getty Images)What really annoys you?There’s not much that really gets to me. The boys at Racing ask me why I’m always happy, but that’s just the way I am: pretty chill.Do you have any nicknames?At Racing, Simon Zebo calls me ‘White Chocolate’. Back in the day at Glasgow, Chris Fusaro had boys referring to me as Finn ‘The Muscle’ Russell as I didn’t do much in the gym.What’s your most embarrassing moment? On a rugby field, there are maybe things others see as embarrassing which wash over me. Off the pitch, it’s probably something on a night out, but nothing I can remember.Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with? I’d rather be in there by myself, if I’m honest. A few boys got stuck in the lift at the Scotland team hotel a couple of years back and were all going on about how uncomfortable it was having to squash together on the floor.The worst person to be trapped with would be someone tall – or Wilson.If you could have one superpower, what would it be? I’d love to be able to control time, to go back to moments where you were really happy or you’d like to change, and then to be able to fast-forward to being out of lockdown.Any superstitions? I used to strap my wrists before games but at a certain point I stopped because I understood it doesn’t really make a difference. It was more of a routine than a superstition.If you could be one team-mate, who would it be? I’d be Hoggy for his pay cheque but then you’ve got to have that hair! Jonny Gray could be alright because he sleeps half the day, but he’s always got sore shoulders or knees. I don’t fancy being a forward.Maybe Duhan van der Merwe; he scores a lot of tries, gets a lot of the glory and is in real good shape. He’s 110kg and super fast – you can’t go far wrong with that.center_img The Racing and Scotland fly-half talks Maradona, Mastermind and muscles with Mark Palmer This article originally appeared in the June 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Continue reading

Episcopales sioux celebran el resurgimiento de una iglesia de las…

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bonnnie Anderson, ex presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, recibe una manta de retazos al final del oficio de consagración del 25 de noviembre en la iglesia episcopal de Santiago en agradecimiento por haber dirigido el Fondo de Reconstrucción Ikpanazin que reunió $67.532 para ayudar con los costos de la nueva iglesia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, actual presidente de la Cámara de Diputados de la Iglesia Episcopal, donó los candelabros, los hachones procesionales y el Cirio Pascual en honor de su predecesora, Bonnie Anderson, que ayudó a recaudar el dinero para construir la nueva iglesia de Santiago.La mayoría de los muebles principales, entre ellos el púlpito, las barandas del comulgatorio, los bancos y un retablo que contiene una pintura mural de la Ascensión, cuyo trasfondo puede ser una representación de las colinas que se encuentran fuera de la iglesia, vinieron de la iglesia luterana Houhlum en Lake Park, Minnesota. Floberg creció en Hawley, al oeste de Lake Park, y se enteró de la clausura de la iglesia en agosto de 2013 mientras leía el periódico local y [de inmediato] se puso en contacto con la congregación  [luterana] para contarles del incendio en la iglesia de Santiago y del plan de reconstrucción.El altar, sin embargo, es otra historia. Una simple mesa con los laterales cerrados, en cuyo frente se destaca la palabra Wakan (Santo) flanqueada por una cruz dorada, había servido a la congregación de Santiago —regalo de la iglesia congregacional de Big Lake— en la reserva india hasta los años 90. Cuando una iglesia episcopal en el vecino Park Ridge cerró y sus muebles vinieron a Santiago, el viejo altar se envió al Campamento San Gabriel [St. Gabriel’s Camp] en Solen. Ahora se encuentra de regreso en Santiago.La construcción de una nueva [iglesia de] Santiago a los 16 meses del incendio ha sido un esfuerzo de primera magnitud. Un acuerdo con el seguro de la Iglesia [Church Insurance] sumado a algún dinero diocesano hizo ascender la recaudación a $359.392, aunque aún faltaba una diferencia. Anderson dirigió el Fondo de Reconstrucción Ikpanazin que reunió otros $67.532, junto con $5.000 en donaciones y promesas de la propia congregación de Santiago, dijo Floberg a Episcopal News Service. La Ofrenda Unida de Gracias le dio a la iglesia una subvención de $48.500 durante su asignación de fondos de 2013.Pat Fearing, representante local de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias, describe cómo la subvención de $48.500 que la iglesia de Santiago recibió como ayuda a la reconstrucción de su nuevo templo —y todas las subvenciones de la UTO— provienen de contribuciones que los episcopales hacen en gran medida a través de las “cajitas azules”, como la que sostiene el Rdo. John Floberg. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.El empeño de recaudación combinado sobrepasó los objetivos y ahora está en marcha una segunda fase para construir un terreno de béisbol y áreas de picnic cerca de la iglesia.Sin embargo, los fondos que se recogieron durante el oficio de consagración del 23 de noviembre se donarán. “En gratitud por todo lo que hemos recibido de los demás”, le dijo Smith a la congregación, el dinero se destinará al empeño de la Iglesia Episcopal  de reconstruir la catedral destruida por el terremoto en Puerto Príncipe, Haití, la primera fase del cual se espera que cueste $15 millones.La firma constructora Prairie Outpost Log Homes de Mandan, a unos 64 kilómetros al norte, construyó el encofrado de madera de la iglesia de Santiago luego de sugerir el concepto de troncos de balsa que suben en espiral para imitar los postes de una tienda  india y con piezas en cruz que añaden el efecto del atrapasueños. Jordan Shelltrack, un joven miembro de la congregación que leyó un pasaje del Apocalipsis durante el oficio, bosquejó el plano del suelo. Más detalles acerca del proceso de la planificación pueden encontrarse aquí. Una colección de fotos de la página de Facebook de la congregación aquí recorre las faces de la construcción.De mayo a septiembre, la congregación se reunió para el culto en un salón de banquetes de propiedad tribal, Prairie Knights Casino and Resort, a unos 16 kilómetros al sur de la iglesia, y los miembros acudieron después allí para una comida. El nuevo edificio ha sido utilizado por los 60 miembros del grupo de jóvenes de la parroquia para reunirse todos los miércoles por la noche.La iglesia episcopal de Santiago en Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte, antes de que un incendio destruyera la propiedad el 25 de julio de 2012.‘Uno de los pueblos más difíciles de Dakota del Norte’La congregación de Santiago se estableció en 1890 en Cannon Ball, que es parte de la Reserva Permanente de Indios Sioux de Cannon Ball, y ha sido el hogar de generaciones de episcopales, dijo Floberg.Cannon Ball, en la parte centro sur del estado, fue el primer lugar en que se estableció la Iglesia Episcopal en la reserva de Dakota del Norte. Otras tres congregaciones remontan sus raíces a Santiago, según la página web diocesana. Los oficios incluyen himnos en legua dakota.En la página web de la diócesis, la congregación dice encontrarse en “uno de los pueblos más difíciles de Dakota del Norte. Los niveles de alcoholismo y de desempleo son muy elevados. Pero no vamos a darnos por vencidos”. Ese pensamiento estaba escrito antes de que el incendiario hiciera su obra.“La iglesia era una roca en el cimiento de la pequeña comunidad de la reserva”, dijo el Bismarck Tribune en un editorial del 21 de noviembre que alentaba a la comunidad en su continuo servicio a la gente del lugar.Alrededor de 875 personas viven en la zona de Cannon Ball, de los cuales 813 son nativoamericanas, según el Censo de 2010.Conforme a uno de los criterios, el ingreso promedio en 2011 fue de $25.504; en comparación con $51.704 del estado como un todo, y el ingreso per cápita es de $9.597, mientras el promedio del estado se acerca a $26.000.La participación de la Iglesia Episcopal con los sioux comenzó de mediados a fines del siglo XIX después de la sublevación dakota de 1862 en la vecina Minnesota que dio lugar a que el gobierno de Estados Unidos los deportara a las reservas de Dakota del Sur. Inmediatamente después de la guerra de Secesión, el gobierno federal les ofreció tierras a varias denominaciones cristianas a cambio de su complicidad en el empeño de obligar a los indios a asimilarse a la cultura de los colonos blancos mediante el sistema de reservas del gobierno federal.La Iglesia Episcopal ayudó a llevar a cabo ese plan, principalmente al este del río Misurí. La Convención General de 1871 creó el Distrito Misionero de Niobrara, que incluía partes o la totalidad de lo que son ahora Dakota del Norte, Dakota del Sur, Wyoming y Nebraska. Los episcopales que viven dentro de las fronteras de ese distrito anterior todavía se reúnen en convocación cada mes de junio.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 2, 2013 Episcopales sioux celebran el resurgimiento de una iglesia de las cenizas de un incendio provocado La congregación de Santiago vuelve a casa en busca de ‘un lugar para nuevos recuerdos’ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI La Rda. Delores Watson, diácona de la iglesia episcopal de San Lucas en Fort Yates, Dakota del Norte, usa la manga de su alba para secar a Mance Chasson Spotted Elk, de 1 año, después de haber sido bautizada por el obispo Michael Smith de Dakota del Norte el 23 de noviembre. Mance, a quien sostiene su madre, Dusty Spotted Elk, fue el primer bebé bautizado en la nueva iglesia de Santiago en Cannon Ball. Joshua Floberg, que renovó su pacto bautismal unos minutos después, observa la escena. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg par ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte] En la radiante aunque fría mañana del 23 de noviembre, aquí en la reserva india de Standing Rock, la congregación de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago [St. James] inauguró oficialmente una nueva iglesia que se asemeja a una tienda nativoamericana y que se percibe como si los feligreses se reunieran en un atrapasueños.La temperatura rondaba en torno a los 6 grados F. (-14 C.) y un viento ligero soplaba del cercano río Misurí mientras los miembros de la congregación y los visitantes permanecían de pie en el estacionamiento de suelo de grava a la espera del comienzo del oficio.Cantaban “Muchas y grandes [son] tus obras, oh Dios” [“Many and Great”] un himno que el Rdo. John Floberg, rector de Santiago, dijo que creía que había sido el primer himno cristiano escrito en lakota. Él le contó a la congregación que fue  ese himno el que iban cantando los 38 dakotas el 26 de diciembre de 1862 camino del patíbulo en lo que habría de ser la mayor ejecución llevada a cabo en un solo día en la historia de Estados Unidos. Los reos habían sido declarados culpables de haber formado parte de una sublevación ese año.“Que se abra la puerta” dijo Michael Smith, obispo de Dakota del Norte, llevando un penacho indio de plumas, en lugar de la mitra, mientras golpeaba sonoramente la puerta de la iglesia.El techo de la nueva iglesia episcopal de Santiago en Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte evoca una tienda nativoamericana y un atrapasueños. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg para ENS.Cuando el Rdo. Neil Two Bears y la acólita Mia Two Bears abrieron la puerta, Smith proclamó: “Paz sea a esta casa y a todos los que entran en ella” al tiempo que usaba su báculo pastoral para trazar el signo de la cruz en el umbral.La escena no tenía nada que ver con la noche del 25 de julio de 2012, Fiesta de Santiago, cuando un incendio deliberado se propagó por las estructuras de madera de la iglesia y del salón parroquial.Phoenix Martínez, de 19 años, se declaró culpable de un cargo de incendió voluntario y fue sentenciado el 30 de septiembre a tres años y cuatro meses de reclusión en una cárcel federal, seguido por cinco años de libertad supervisada. También le impusieron que pagara una restitución de $354.100.El único recuerdo visible de esa noche es la cruz que cuelga delante de una manta de retazos sobre el púlpito. Está hecha de dos toscos pedazos de madera chamuscados provenientes del piso del salón parroquial, la única madera que no se redujo a cenizas en el incendio.“Es como un regreso al hogar”, dijo Florestine Grant, la guardiana mayor, antes del comienzo del oficio. “Soñamos con las cosas que podemos hacer por los niños, los ancianos y por la cultura”.Una de sus hijas, Alex Spotted Elk, dijo que era una lástima que un incendio hubiera obligado a la congregación a tener que construir un nuevo edificio. Pero, agregó, al tiempo que miraba hacia el techo de la nueva iglesia, “este es un lugar para nuevos recuerdos”.El Rdo. Terry Star, diácono que creció en [la congregación] de Santiago y que ahora es seminarista en Nashotah House en Wisconsin, recordaba durante su sermón cómo hace casi 100 años un obispo episcopal les dijo a los sioux de la zona que tenían que renunciar a sus adornos indios para ser cristianos. Esa actitud ha cambiado, afirmó Star, como resulta obvio de la decoración de la nueva iglesia de Santiago.El Rdo. Terry Star, un diácono que creció en la iglesia de Santiago y que es seminarista en Nashotah House, predica el 23 de noviembre durante la consagración de la nueva iglesia de Santiago. Detrás de él está la cruz hecha de dos rugosas piezas de madera chamuscadas provenientes del piso del salón parroquial de Santiago, la única madera que no se redujo a cenizas en el incendio provocado del 25 de julio de 2012. Foto de Mary Frances para ENS.“Podemos ser dakotas; podemos ser quienes somos —para lo que Dios nos hizo— y no obstante seguir a Jesucristo”, afirmó.Star dijo que esperaba que la iglesia hermosa y colorida llegara a convertirse en un símbolo pujante para las personas de la zona.Él recordó un relato que le contaba su abuela acerca de Iya, un monstruo gigantesco cuyo nombre significa literalmente “boca”, y de Ikto, el embaucador que halagaba al monstruo para que éste confiara en él. Ikto fingió ser el hermano mayor del monstruo y le preguntó a éste que era lo que más temía. Iya le dijo que le temía al estruendo de cantos y tambores. Ikto fue hasta la próxima aldea y les dijo que empezaran a celebrar con cantos y tambores.La treta funcionó; Iya se quedó paralizado por el miedo e Ikto aprovechó la oportunidad para matarlo. Cuando le abrieron el estómago a Iya, todas las personas que el monstruo se había tragado recobraron la vida.“Hay una oscuridad que está devorando a nuestro pueblo” dijo Star. “Algo se está tragando a nuestra gente”.Un paseo en torno a Cannon Ball, agregó, muestra una falta de “arte y colorido”, nada más que “casas pintadas de color malvavisco”, cuyos tonos no fueron escogidos por sus ocupantes.“Tenemos una oportunidad en este edificio y a través del Evangelio y a través de nuestro culto en este edificio de devolverle color y celebración a la comunidad”, añadió. “Podemos ahuyentar al Iya que está devorando a nuestro pueblo”.Star dijo que los miembros deberían invitar [a la iglesia] a artistas “que puedan escuchar estos pasajes del Evangelio y expresarle a la iglesia estos relatos evangélicos a través de su obra” y “mostrar que hay lugar aquí para ese clase de obra”.Él también instó a la congregación a no ser tan sólo asistentes de Navidad y Pascua.“Este edificio no funciona si sólo se usa en Navidad y Pascua; tenemos que estar aquí todo el tiempo”, enfatizó.Y luego, “toda la alegría y la felicidad” que viene de adorar aquí en este espacio, dijo Star “no se supone que se quede aquí”.“Se supone que las saquemos por esas puertas y las llevemos a la comunidad”, concluyó. “Matemos ese Iya y devolvámosle la alegría y la felicidad a nuestra comunidad”.Star, que leyó el Evangelio en Dakota, epitomizó la confluencia del cristianismo occidental y de la espiritualidad sioux de la Iglesia. Él estaba revestido de sotana, sobrepelliz, esclavina y bandas de predicación, llevaba un medallón en que parecía bordado con mostacillas el crismón o cristograma [las dos primeras letras griegas del nombre de Cristo], una pluma de águila sujeta al cabello e iba calzado con unos mocasines con mostacillas. Star leyó su sermón en un iPad.Una iglesia llena de artistas y donantesLa nueva iglesia de Santiago, todavía con los rincones un poco sin terminar y con cajas de revestimientos para el piso escondidas debajo de los bancos, y donde instalaron las barandas del comulgatorio en las primeras horas de esa misma mañana, está equipada con artículos y muebles de otras iglesias, junto con nuevas contribuciones.Una colorida manta de retazos cuelga de cada una de las cuatro esquinas de la nave. Estas mantas con frecuencia se obsequian en funerales, ceremonias para darle nombre a alguien, bodas y otras celebraciones que representan la gratitud del dador hacia la persona que la recibe. Otra manta de retazos, que adornó el púlpito durante el oficio, también servirá de paño frontal del altar.La pila bautismal, tallada por el artista local Charles McLaughlin, hecha de alabastro de Colorado, evoca una canoa de piel de búfalo, que se usaba para cruzar de una a otra orilla del río Misurí. Algunos sioux yanktonai que sobrevivieron a la masacre de White Stone Hill de 1863 cruzaron el río para vivir con otros dakotas asentados cerca de la desembocadura del río Cannon Ball.White Stone Hill estará representada en un mural lateral del ápside que aún está por terminarse. Las montañas cercanas aparecerán representadas en el otro panel y, en el medio, la Nueva Jerusalén como una aldea india, dijo Floberg.En la parte inferior del lateral donde han de pintarse las montañas cercanas, ya cuelga una gran pantalla plana de televisión.Holly Doll, nieta de dos episcopales de abolengo de [la tribu de] Standing Rock, el Rdo. Innocent y Edna Goodhouse, diseñó y creó un evangelario de parfleche. Esto último es una bolsa de cuero crudo que los indios de las Grandes Planicies usaban tradicionalmente para guardar y llevar documentos importantes. La Biblia que se encuentra dentro de esta bolsa es una traducción al dakota del Nuevo Testamento.Algunos episcopales de la zona donaron otros artículos y la iglesia de la Santa Trinidad [Holy Trinity] de Juneau, Alaska, otra iglesia que sabe lo que es perder su edificio en un incendio, donó la cruz procesional. Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Continue reading

Ministry serves farmworkers through sacraments, outreach

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Ministry serves farmworkers through sacraments, outreach Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Farmworkers wear long pants, sleeves and gloves to work in the fields partly to protect themselves from pesticide exposure. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Newton Grove, North Carolina] On a rainy, humid mid-September morning five hours before the Sunday noon Eucharist at Sacred Family, the Rev. Tony Rojas got behind the wheel of a white van and began making the rounds to pick up men from the farmworker camps set back on highways and county roads among the single- and double-wide trailers and more stately brick homes of rural North Carolina.He picked up men like Abraham Cruz, 47, of Tlaxcala state in east-central Mexico, who for the last seven years has traveled to the United States on a temporary agricultural worker visa to work eight- to 12-hour days in the fields planting and harvesting cucumbers, watermelons, tobacco and sweet potatoes. Cruz’s earnings go to support his family in Mexico, whom he sees two to three months a year.Over the past 18 years, Rojas has built up the Episcopal Farmworker Ministry, a joint ministry of the dioceses of North and East Carolina, with a 16-acre campus on Easy Street in Newton Grove. The ministry serves farmworkers in 47 camps scattered across Sampson, Harnett and Johnston counties.The men arrive by van or decommissioned school buses early for the ministry’s free ESL classes, haircuts, immigration services and tax and legal advising, and to play soccer. Farmworkers, who spend six days laboring in the fields wearing long sleeves and pants to protect themselves from pesticide exposure, on Sundays change into shorts, jerseys and cleats, practicing for an annual daylong soccer tournament organized by the ministry.Farmworkers typically range in age from 18 or 19 to more than 50 years old. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe ministry began in 1982 when a single outreach worker identified a need and from her car began distributing clothing and personal care items to farmworkers, then mostly Haitian migrants. Today, with its sacramental ministry that includes three mission congregations and its 20-plus outreach programs, the ministry reaches 3,500 farmworkers directly and impacts the lives of thousands more.There are some 150,000 farmworkers, the majority of them from Mexico, working in North Carolina’s fields; some documented, some undocumented. The ministry serves them all.Providing sacraments and outreach to farmworkers, regardless of their immigration status, is rooted in the Baptismal Covenant’s call to “strive for justice and peace among all people, and respect the dignity of every human being.”By focusing on the sacraments and social outreach, the ministry remains “bipartisan,” said North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry during an interview with ENS in his office in Raleigh, the state’s capital. “That’s the work of Jesus that can be done by Republicans and Democrats.”Curry has publicly called for immigration reform that would reunite families, but the church’s official advocacy for farmworker justice or immigration reform on the state level is coordinated through the North Carolina Council of Churches, of which the dioceses of North, East and Western North Carolina all are members.Farmworkers head to the fields early in the morning picking sweet potatoes by the bucket load to fill trucks like these. Photo: Christine McTaggart/Diocese of North CarolinaAgriculture has a rich legacy in North Carolina which today ranks fifth nationally with 8.4 million acres under cultivation and more than 50,000 farms producing $11.7 billion annually in agricultural commodities. Though corn, soybeans and cotton are machine-harvested crops, 85 percent of fruits and vegetables – beans, melons, sweet potatoes, tobacco, strawberries –are picked by hand.When members of the North Carolina Growers Association can demonstrate the local labor force is insufficient to meet the production needs of the farms, they can fill the gap through the U.S. Department of Labor’s H-2A temporary agricultural worker program. North Carolina has close to 7,000 H-2A agricultural workers, and ranks high among agricultural states using the program. (The visa program provides legal entry to work, but critics see it as a means to keep farm wages low.)Growers can ask for anywhere between 20 and 200 farmworkers, Rojas said.In 2000, Latinos made up 50 percent of the state’s farmworkers; today that percentage is 95, said Jennie Wilburn, a program associate with the Raleigh-based North Carolina Council of Churches.The North Carolina Council of Churches, its history advocating for the rights of farmworkers going back decades, runs public awareness campaigns in English and Spanish and uses a Bible-based curriculum to involve the churches, said Wilburn.Still, she said, “The political climate for vulnerable groups isn’t great.”Wilburn said, “One thing that’s gotten a lot of attention recently is the Human Rights Watch report on tobacco.”Farmworkers live in trailers like this set back off rural, county roads. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe 138-page report released in May documents the hazardous conditions and nicotine poisoning faced by children working in the top four tobacco producing states, including North Carolina.Alice Freeman, who serves on the farmworker ministry’s board, knows what it’s like to work on a tobacco farm.“I am the daughter of sharecroppers … my dad had five girls, his brother had five girls, they always farmed together, no boys,” she said. “When you grow up on a farm, a tobacco farm with cotton, tobacco, soybeans, corn, you do the work yourselves. We didn’t have brothers to do the work, we didn’t have so much money to hire other workers, we did the work in the fields; I know what it’s like to be in the fields.”The farmworker ministry addresses a need, seeks to treat people as humans, to be compassionate. “When you are a long way from home, a friendly face, a helping hand goes a along way,” said Freeman.(Click here for a video of Alice Freeman talking about the Episcopal Farmworker Ministry and its programs.)In addition to working long hours under the hot sun, migrant and seasonal farmworkers often live in substandard housing sleeping on filthy mattresses or the floor; there might be a shared toilet, or an outhouse, a single shower for bathing and a washtub for laundry.The Rev. Tony Rojas, or “Father Tony,” came to the Episcopal Farmworker Ministry 18 years ago. Rojas himself comes from the Roman Catholic tradition.  Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSDuring his first three years of ministry to farmworkers and witnessing the living conditions, Rojas said he had trouble sleeping. He’d visit camps at 2 a.m. and all the lights would be on and the farmworkers would be preparing their lunches, which sometimes they’d crouch under the bus to eat to get out of the mid-day sun. He’s seen farmworkers suffering nicotine poisoning through their exposed skin rolling on the ground in agony.Even after 18 years of working with farmworkers, Rojas still doesn’t understand how they do it, he said. Like the growers, who face the challenges of farming and often carry heavy loan burdens, farm work is a vocation. The farmworkers and the growers provide human beings with the food necessary to sustain the miracle that is life. “Without food we cannot survive, cannot keep the life,” he said.In 1960, before Cesar Chavez founded the National Farmworkers Association bringing attention to the plight of farmworkers, broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow, a native North Carolinian, co-produced an hour-long documentary “Harvest of Shame,” which examined the lives of migrant farmworkers and the poverty that marked their lives.Murrow’s film depicts the lives of primarily white and African-American farmworkers; today’s farmworkers come mostly from Mexico and Central America. Otherwise, the lives of migrant farmworkers have changed little, according to a follow-up, 30-minute documentary, “Harvest of Dignity,” produced in 2011 in association with the Durham-based Student Action with Farmworkers.Farmworkers with temporary worker status, or the seasonal workers, are guaranteed certain employee rights, their travel to and from the United States paid for, housing and food provided, and they live on the farm to which they are assigned. Seasonal workers rely on the growers to bring them back to work year after year, and can sit idle while waiting for crops to come in; undocumented workers tend to be migratory and follow their crew leaders to where the work is.A report released in 2011 studying migrant farmworkers’ housing conditions in North Carolina conducted by the National Institutes of Health found housing standards inadequately enforced and farmworkers living in substandard conditions, with undocumented workers living in worse conditions than temporary workers.Over the years Rojas said he’s seen some camps’ living conditions improve. And through grassroots efforts, like those of the North Carolina Council of Churches, Student Action with Farmworkers and the Farmworker Advocacy Network, more and more people in urban areas, like Raleigh, Durham and Research Triangle Park are becoming aware of the farmworkers living within 50 miles of them.For instance, “Harvest of Dignity,” said Wilburn, led the North Carolina Department of Labor, which inspects migrant and seasonal farmworker housing, to require camps to have one toilet per every 10 and one washtub per every 30 residents.(Jon Showalter and his family, members of Church of the Nativity in Raleigh, North Carolina, have for a decade driven the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle some 40 miles to the Episcopal Farmworker Ministry in Newton Grove, the first Saturday of every month. “It has been a blessing for our family to be involved in this ministry,” Showalter said. Click here for video of the food shuttle.)Changing demographics“Strong roots, new growth,” reads a sign at the entrance to Harnett County, where on one side of Highway 55 is the campus of Stoney Run Pentecostal Free Will Baptist Church and on the other is Iglesia de Dios Cristo Redentor, or Christ the Redeemer Church of God.For the Episcopal Church, said Rojas, to have a presence in this part of the state is itself an anomaly, and building it up among the Latino population, with its Catholic roots, wasn’t easy.“Latinos by culture and tradition come from the Roman Catholic Church, that’s the one true church,” he said. For them, a different church “means the devil is coming.Now, however, at peak harvest, the Sacred Family mission, which meets on a concrete slab under a metal roof on the ministry’s property, is one of the largest Episcopal congregation in North Carolina, serving migrant farmworkers, families and immigrants who’ve made the state home.Soccer has always played a strong role in Rojas’s ministry. Here on a Sunday morning farmworkers practice for an upcoming annual tournament before the Eucharist. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSAt 78, Rojas, a former Roman Catholic priest-cum professional soccer player in his native Colombia, maintains a youthful appearance. And when he first began his ministry in the camps, it was the soccer ball that gave him entrance, not the Bible.“That was how I built a natural relationship with the farmworkers,” he said. After he’d gained their trust, he said, they began asking for blessings and the sacraments.It took seven years, working for three of those years with the same 18 people.Today, however, Rojas said, it’s understood that all are welcome and the message is simple: “Christ is our lord and savior … and to live a Christian life: love God, love self and love the other.”It touches Father Tony to administer the Eucharist to men, like Abraham Cruz, here,  with calloused hands, because in Latino culture, women are more likely to present themselves for the Eucharist, he said. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSAfter making inroads into the Latino community and building up the farmworker ministry, for a time serving as both the sacramental minister and the ministry’s executive director, Rojas’ next priority is to fortify Sacred Family, which is housed on the ministry’s administrative campus in Newton Grove, and the two other congregations he serves, St. Joseph’s in Smithfield and St. Francis in Goldsboro.After noon Eucharist, Rojas drives some of the farmworkers back to the camps, and then drives some 25 miles to Goldsboro for a 4 p.m. Eucharist. (Click here for a video of Rojas reflecting on his ministry.)Since the year 2000, North Carolina’s Hispanic population has increased by 111 percent, according to a report by the Center for American Progress, a Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan, independent educational institute.In rural schools, like Hobbton Middle School, where 12-year-old Idalia Rubio-Trejo is a sixth grader, the student body is almost half Latino, Rubio-Trejo said.Idalia’s father is a farmworker and her mother is a homemaker. Idalia, who is fully bilingual, has three brothers and two sisters; the family has been in North Carolina for 16 years and attends services at Sacred Family on Sundays.In addition to Rojas, the Episcopal Farmworker Ministry is staffed by Silvia Cendejas, assistant director; and Maria Acosta, an immigration specialist who annually assists some 3,000 immigrants navigate paperwork, work visa renewals and petitions for family reunification.One need Cendejas and Acosta have identified that is not being met is to provide assistance to women in domestic violence situations. The women are confronted with three or four cases weekly, they said.An individual farmworker on average must pick two tons, 4,000 pounds, of sweet potatoes to earn $50. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe population increase and the fact that more often farmworkers and their families are choosing to remain in North Carolina year-round has put increased demands on the ministry, said Patti Trainor, the Diocese of North Carolina’s development coordinator for the farmworker ministry.Longtime volunteer Rolffs Pinkerton, a retired psychologist and member of Church of the Holy Family in Chapel Hill, who 10 years ago began volunteering as a translator, framed it this way: “We’re asked to serve the neediest of the neediest,” said Pinkerton, a North Carolinian who grew up in Venezuela. “And this is probably as close as you can come in North Carolina; I don’t know of a population more in need.”To meet the demands of a growing Latino population and to continue to serve farmworkers, in 2013 the Diocese of North Carolina initiated the Harvest for Hospitality campaign aimed at raising $400,000 – double the ministry’s annual budget – by June 2015.Robert E. Wright, who co-chairs the campaign, said Harvest for Hospitality is an investment: “They [immigrants] are a part of our community, and us, a part of theirs.“It’s a holistic ministry, body, soul and spirit; it’s really seeing people as people, as fellow human beings. It’s empowering, not paternalistic.”Harvest for Hospitality also aims to bring the farmworker ministry into the 21st century, said the Rev. Lisa Fischbeck, who co-chairs the campaign with Wright and serves as vicar of Church of the Advocate in Chapel Hill.A successful campaign will not only to provide the ministry with the financial resources necessary for transformation – the hiring of a new executive director and a person to serve as a liaison between the growers and the farmworkers – but also engage young people, both as participants in the ministry and financial supporters.Already, young people are active in the ministry’s visitation program. In June, for example, the youth group at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Southern Pines helped out at a nearby Head Start program for children of migrants, did yard work, and with Rojas, visited the camps distributing clothing and personal care items to farmworkers.The participants, said Paul Collins, the youth minister at Emmanuel, took their experiences and their stories about farmworkers home with them and shared them; they’ll continue to engage in the work and educate themselves about issues affecting farmworkers. After all, he said, they are the future voters.– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Lynette WilsonPosted Oct 10, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

Continue reading

Bishops from Fiji to Alaska to meet in Cape Town…

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Richard McClellan says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (14) February 21, 2015 at 5:33 pm My friend, it appears God has engaged in the debate. God bless you and stay warm. Humans think they are in charge of creation, it is good to see God has not abdicated His Authority. Advocacy Peace & Justice, February 24, 2015 at 12:02 pm SKYPING this meeting would have made a smaller carbon footprint – especially considering that it is advocacy by people who don’t create legislation or policy. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Rev. Lucretia Jevne says: Rector Bath, NC February 21, 2015 at 4:44 pm God’s word specifically declares that climate change will always exist. There are four different seasons ya know? Ron Davin says: Rector Shreveport, LA February 21, 2015 at 2:57 pm It was zero near Boston today, without global warming we could very well have been in the negative range. How cold do you want it to get here ? Bishops from Fiji to Alaska to meet in Cape Town on climate change Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH February 22, 2015 at 12:41 am Yes, there are four seasons, and the climate has varied over the course of thousands of years. The issue at hand is that climate change is happening much more rapidly now than in the past. Much of the rapidity of change is related to the impact that larger numbers of humans and the byproducts of our technology have had on the generally slower pace of natural variation. God gave us brains to address the issue, and God expects us to use them. We must adapt more quickly to the more rapid changes, and acknowledge our responsibility to be good stewards of God’s creation. Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 21, 2015 at 7:39 pm Indeed! Rector Martinsville, VA February 21, 2015 at 7:19 am How does this make disciples of all nations? Richard McClellan says: February 23, 2015 at 8:55 pm I completely believe in climate change, except I prefer to call it weather. This is money so well spent. BTW, Richard McClellan, that’s a slam dunk comment! Thank you. Doug Desper says: Richard McClellan says: Tags Posted Feb 20, 2015 Richard McClellan says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME John Van Leer says: Richard McClellan says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET February 23, 2015 at 9:03 am Accelerating Sea Level Rise will impact the global coastlines with impacts which will challenge rich and especially the poorest among us. The Pacific islander driven from his of her home had almost no impactful emissions of green house gases. The degraded coral reefs they depend upon are impacted by global warming. That global oceans and growing warmer and more acidic are a sure signs of trouble. Oysters are having trouble making shells. The Inuit, whose permafrost supported villages are literally melting from under their feet, are being forced to move their settlements inland away from their traditional oceanic food sources. It took billions of years for this beautifully balanced earth system to evolve. How much damage can man unkind do in only a century? We have the means of generating renewable energy today, so we don’t need to keep burning fossil carbon into the future, since the natural god given systems can’t absorb it fast enough, to avoid rising temperatures, melting glacial ice and Sea Level Rise. We should save the fossil carbon for future generations to use for the many petrochemicals the modern world depends upon. The Citizens Climate Lobby has put forth the revenue neutral Shultz Becker plan, which puts an escalating tax on carbon which is refunded to all the households in the USA which can reduce carbon emission as much as 90% by 2030 giving the world a real shot at recovery. Anglican Communion, Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service February 24, 2015 at 6:28 pm So how much colder must it get here in Boston for that Pacific Islander to be more comfortable ? If next year that -4 degrees becomes – 10 degrees in Boston will we have done enough ? Do they still use the scientific method to develop a theory ? If so, it should be easy to tabulate how much colder we need to be. How will life be, how will the economy be in this country if we reduce carbon emission 90m %. All while China and India have expressed a reluctance to cut their emissions despite their smog and pollution problems. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN February 22, 2015 at 6:51 pm “stewards of God’s creation”. Something nobody ever said about an abortionist. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Fr. Will McQueen says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Doug Desper says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Pamela Payne says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 27, 2015 at 9:04 am I’m pro life. Abortion, war, you name it. Saving lives and souls should be TEC’s main focus, not controlling something that God alone controls. Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK William A. Flint, PhD says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Anglican Church of Southern Africa press release] Anglican bishops from some of the regions of the world most challenged by climate change – from Fiji to Argentina, and Namibia to Alaska – are to meet in Cape Town next week to work out strategies for achieving climate justice.A briefing from the Rev. Rachel Mash, the environmental coordinator for the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, follows with full details:THE ECO-BISHOPS ARE COMING TO CAPE TOWNArchbishop Thabo Makgoba, chair of the Anglican Communion Environmental Network, is calling together a group of bishops from various countries impacted by climate change.Bishops have been chosen from countries reflecting the great challenges we face, from the sea level rise of Fiji, the deforestation of Argentina, the droughts of Namibia, the tsunamis of the Philippines and the storms of New York, and the warming of Alaska. These bishops are united in their commitment to addressing these environmental challenges.Sixteen bishops will be gathering in Capetown from Feb. 23 to exchange ideas and concerns, to share challenges and successes. First the bishops will hear about the challenges faced in different parts of the globe.Then they will share actions and theologies that have been helpful in moving forward. The goal is to strategize together in order strategies for raising the issue of climate change and environmental degradation throughout the global Anglican Church.What is the event? A strategic planning meeting hosted by the primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa of a core group of bishops and archbishops whose dioceses or provinces are in areas affected by climate change or in areas that contribute significantly to conditions that lead to climate change. The bishops and archbishops identified are already active in responding to climate change and environmental degradation as a result of human activity in various ways, e.g., through theological exposition and challenge, advocacy, greening churches and communities, and supporting local mitigation.Building on relationships already established virtually, the meeting will foster a strengthened, working collegiality among the bishops who have been identified and ultimately serve as a catalyst for further response and activities throughout the Anglican Communion.The bishops will share their experience in responding to climate change so far, their hopes, their concerns, and ideas about how they, specifically, might organize themselves better for that purpose. They will have an opportunity to reflect and study together, and to look at the obstacles they face and discern what they can do, by working together, to move through these obstacles.Drawing on their own experience and ideas, a strategic plan will be developed for themselves, with proposals for broader engagement in the Anglican Communion.Science and the experience of the impacts of climate change suggest that in many ways survival is at stake – for human communities, for the ecosystems on which human life depends. We have listened to Anglicans in a number of regions where congregations face food and water shortages and other stresses that are directly linked to climate change. The meeting and the broader project will enable Anglicans at leadership level to make coordinated efforts towards upholding human dignity and the integrity of creation, and strengthening interdependence within the Anglican Communion as we become better stewards of God’s creation. It is hoped that the outcomes of this project will have an impact that reaches far beyond the present time.Expected outcomesTo form a group of bishops and archbishops (Eco Bishops) representative of the regions of the Anglican Communion, will have participated in the core group as described above and worked together to formulate an action plan for themselves, with proposals for broader Anglican engagement in responding to climate change, faithfully, prayerfully and proactively.The core group of bishops will become visible in offering biblical and moral leadership in the area of climate justice. Their experience and deliberations will be communicated to Anglicans and others around the world via ACEN, news releases and other forms of media.As a resource for the broader Communion, a concise report will be produced, gathering the bishops’ lived experience and responses to climate change and setting out future actions. More Anglicans will understand that responding to climate change is part and parcel of our baptismal vocation and will be active in greening their homes, churches and communities and in speaking out on behalf of those experiencing the worst effects of climate change. The Anglican Church will become active in global advocacy.The Primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa (currently the chair of ACEN) will have shared the experiences and deliberations of the core group with his sister and brother Primates. Anglican leadership will increasingly be taking the initiative in networking effectively with ecumenical partners, other faith groups, government and UN structures. Those currently affected by the impacts of climate change will be given a voice at the international level of the Communion, and know that they are remembered and supported, both in the prayer and in practical ways.Those who have the power to curtail carbon emissions will have a fresh sense of how their actions can have a positive impact on their sisters and brothers in other parts of the world and contribute towards climate justice.The Anglican Communion will benefit from a shared endeavor.The following Eco-Bishops will be coming to Cape Town:Jane Alexander, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Mark MacDonald, National Indigenous Bishop, Canada; Andrew Dietsche, New York, The Episcopal Church; Nick Drayson, Northern Argentina; Nicholas Holtam, Salisbury, Church of England; David Chillingworth, St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane, Scottish Episcopal Church; Chad Gandiya, Harare, Central Africa; William Mchombo, Eastern Zambia, Central Africa; Ellinah Wamukoya, Swaziland, Southern Africa; Stephen Moreo, Johannesburg, Southern Africa; Nathaniel Nakwatumbah, Namibia, Southern Africa; Thabo Makgoba, Cape Town, Church of Southern Africa; Thomas Oommen, Madhya Kerala, Church of South India; Andrew Chan, Hong Kong; Jonathan Casimina, Davao, Philippines; Tom Wilmot, Perth, Australia; and Apimeleki Qiliho, Fiji, Aotearoa-New Zealand.For more information contact: The Rev. Rachel Mash – [email protected]  Ron Davin says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release February 21, 2015 at 4:05 pm Caring for creation and exploring the effects of our ways of life on the climate are part of loving our neighbors and ourselves. February 24, 2015 at 4:53 pm I have an inspired idea and one that I am totally serious about. It would actually be a trend-setter and would lead the way to preserve this world in better fashion than our wasteful niching and grouping habits.Tear down 815 Second Avenue. Return it to a green space as a gift and example. A nice park. A prayer garden in a overly important day. Move the few necessary (down-sized) General Convention offices to the grounds of the National Cathedral. The College of Preachers went broke some years ago and that space would do nicely. Don’t we only need about 4 office suites and 6 support offices anyway?Now THAT’s right use of resources. That’s leaving a smaller carbon print. That’s wise stewardship for activities that do not require office space that competes with the Stock Exchange. Beats burning up plane tickets and fluorescent bulbs to get together to talk about what other people should be doing…or, are our liberal friends thinking about someone else to do the trendsetting, and someone else to exercise the generosity and creative stewardship? Environment & Climate Change Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Continue reading

Gayle Fisher-Stewart appointed chaplain for Takoma Park Police Department

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Takoma Park Police Department] Takoma Park, Maryland, Police Chief Antonio DeVaul announces that the Rev. Gayle Fisher-Stewart has been appointed police chaplain for the Takoma Park Police Department.“It is an honor to have the Rev. Dr. Fisher-Stewart as our official department chaplain. Her compassion and expertise will be an asset to our agency and the City of Takoma Park,” said DeVaul.Fisher-Stewart currently serves as the assistant pastor at Calvary Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. A native Washingtonian, prior to accepting the call to ordained ministry, she retired from the Metropolitan Police Department as a captain and then taught at the university level. Her area of special interest is the history of policing as it intersects with race in America. She is the founder of the Center for the Study of Faith in Justice at Calvary which conducts research and creates a safe space for the discussion of issues that vex both society and the church and is the president for the Washington, D.C., chapter of the Union of Black Episcopalians.Fisher-Stewart is a graduate of the University of Maryland University College (BS), the University of Maryland (MS, Ph.D), American University (MS), the University of the District of Columbia (MA) and Wesley Theological Seminary (MTS). She was the 2015 recipient of the Director’s Award, Episcopal Evangelism Society and, in 2017, she was awarded an honorary doctorate of divinity from Colgate University.Fisher-Stewart is the mother of a son, David, who is her heart.“As a long-time resident of Takoma Park, I am honored to be working with my police department and I thank Chief DeVaul for the opportunity to serve,” said Fisher-Stewart. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Jun 13, 2018 Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Gayle Fisher-Stewart appointed chaplain for Takoma Park Police Department Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem People Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

Continue reading