Good row crops

first_imgTomato spotted wilt virus damagePeanut farmers will probably have to accept some losses to thetomato spotted wilt virus this year. Georgia’s tobacco crop hasalready been hit particularly hard by the virus and this usuallyindicates the virus will be tough on peanuts as well, Beasleysaid.TSWV is spread by small insects known as thrips. Thrips pass thevirus to plants when they feed on them. The virus reproduces andspreads throughout entire plants. In many cases, it dwarfs theplants. Yields can be low or nonexistent if the virus attacksplants early in their growth.Scattered showers have put some farmers behind on fungicide andherbicide applications, Beasley said. This could cause someproblems later in the season. But peanut farmers, in most cases, prefer to deal with theproblems associated with a wet year over the ones related to adry year, he said. Georgia farmers are expected to grow about 565,000 acres ofpeanuts this year, a little more than last year. By Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaAfter a dry spring and planting time, Georgia’s peanut and cottoncrops are benefitting from the wet start to summer caused byscattered but numerous showers across the state.Since Memorial Day weekend, peanut farmers have seen exactly theweather they like: warm temperatures and high humidity creatingrain clouds, said John Beasley, a peanut agronomist with theUniversity of Georgia Extension Service.”The rain has come mostly as scattered thunderstorms,” Beasleysaid. “Some fields have received more than others, but mostfields have received some rain in the last three weeks.”The dry spring caused some disease and insect problems. But sofar Georgia’s peanut crop is in good shape for this time of theseason. Peanut demand high, cotton demand lowThe demand for peanut butter and consumer peanut products isgrowing, says Nathan Smith, a peanut economist with the UGAExtension Service. Consumer demand is up about 8 percent fromthis time last year.He attributes the higher demand to more peanut-based products onthe market, farmer-funded promotions and trendy high-proteindiets. Peanuts are high source of protein.To keep up with this demand, U.S. peanut farmers need to have agood year. To meet the increase in demand and sustain currentstockpiles, U.S. growers need to average about 2,900 pounds peracre this year, Smith said. U.S. peanut farmers have averaged about 2,650 per acre over thelast ten years. This average includes the 2003 crop, which was arecord year for yields.Cotton prices have dropped drastically to about 53 cents perpound, ten cents less than just two months ago, says Don Shurley,a cotton economist with the UGA Extension Service.Prices fluctuate and typically drop during summer months, butthis cotton price drop has come early this year. Shurley says several factors have contributed to the pricereduction:- The United States is expected to have a large crop thisyear.- The World Trade Organization recently ruled against the United States and brought into question certain U.S. cotton farm policies. – U.S. textile mills slowed down their cotton usage.- The volume of U.S. cotton exports has declined.center_img Cotton crop a little larger this yearGeorgia’s cotton likes the current weather, too, says SteveBrown, a cotton agronomist with the UGA Extension Service.Cotton farmers have had to keep an eye on weed control. They willneed to be vigilant of any insect damage in coming months, hesaid.Georgia growers are expected to produce about 1.35 million acresof cotton this year, a little more than last year.The rain has made plant canopies healthy and lush up to thispoint. But Brown says nature’s water tap doesn’t need to turn offany time soon.Most peanut plants are blooming right now in fields and cottonplants are beginning their blooming stage. For the next twomonths both crops will need about two inches of water, eitherfrom rain or irrigation, per week to sustain good growth andyields.last_img read more

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07 Harvest robbers

first_imgVolume XXXINumber 1Page 7 Alliaceae (chives, garlic, leeks and onions).Apiaceae (carrots).Asteraceae (lettuce).Brassicaceae (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage,cauliflower, collards, mustard, radishes, rutabagas andturnips).Chenopodiaceae (spinach).Cucurbitaceae (cantaloupes, cucumbers, honeydew melons,pumpkins, squash and watermelons).Fabaceae (all beans, English peas and Southern peas).Malvaceae (okra).Poaceae (corn).Solanaceae (eggplant, peppers, potatoes and tomatoes). By Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaWilts, leaf spots, blights and fruit rots all want to destroyvegetables before they can be harvested. But home gardeners cando a few things to keep these diseases away and help ensure abountiful harvest. “Most vegetables are susceptible to a number of diseases,” saidDavid Langston, a Cooperative Extension vegetable plantpathologist with the University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences.Plant diseases are caused by four main types of organisms: fungi,bacteria, nematodes and viruses.Vegetable plants are more susceptible to diseases caused by fungiand bacteria when conditions are wet and warm. Scout your gardenregularly.What to look forWhen the garden is dry, nematode damage is more evident. You cantest your soil for nematodes by submitting a sample through yourcounty UGA Extension office.Viral diseases can show up at any time, Langston said.Many plant diseases can be on or within the seeds. “Seeds shouldnot be saved from year to year,” he said. “This is important toprevent a number of diseases.”Buy seeds from a reputable dealer. You can’t distinguish healthyseeds from diseased seeds. Make sure you follow directions onwhen and how to plant them.Planting disease-resistant varieties are best way to controlvegetable diseases. Buy resistant varieties when you can.Resistance traits are usually listed in seed catalogs and inplant stores.Lots of sunDon’t plant your garden near or beneath trees. The shade willreduce the drying of plant foliage after rain and increase thechances of diseases. Besides, vegetables like a lot of sunlight,and the trees will compete for vital nutrients.Crop rotation is important. If you keep planting the samevegetables in the same spot year after year, you’re asking forsoil-borne disease problems.Grow the same or closely related vegetable plants in the samesoil only once every three to five years, Langston said. Thispractice starves out most pathogens that cause stem and leafdiseases.What to rotateVegetable families include: More tips”Trap crops” can reduce viral diseases carried by small insects.Plant a few rows of a crop like rye or corn around your maingarden. This will tempt insects to feed there first, reducing therisk of diseases some small insects are known to carry.When you water the garden, don’t splash soil onto plant foliage.If possible, run the water between the rows. Use a mulch layer ofstraw, bark, shredded paper or plastic to keep the soil fromsplashing onto plants and keep fruits from touching bare ground.If you use tobacco, wash your hands thoroughly before handlingplants. This will prevent the spread of tobacco mosaic virus,which can infect many kinds of vegetables, particularly tomatoesand peppers.After harvest, remove and destroy all plants from the garden andsanitize your garden equipment. This will reduce theoverwintering of disease-causing organisms.Most important, use proper cultural practices to keep your plantshealthy. “Healthy plants don’t get diseases as easily as weakones,” Langston said. “Healthy plants are the best controlagainst plant diseases.”(Brad Haire is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Targeted grazing

first_imgGoats and sheep have a reputation for eating vegetation that most other grazing animals would not touch. This trait makes them invaluable to people who need to raise livestock in tough climates, but it’s also made them popular for landowners who need to clear brush or invasive plants from overgrown parcels. The nimble grazers can get into overgrown areas that even the most dedicated groundskeeper or gardener won’t chance. They’ve proven to be a low-impact, low-cost way to control invasive plants like privet, kudzu, honeysuckle and English ivy. The practice of using sheep and goats to clear out unwanted brush is called targeted grazing, and many government agencies, municipalities and private landowners are using it to keep vacant lots, steep back yards, parks and right-of-ways clear of brush. When is it time to bring in a herd? Targeted grazing is a suitable option, whether a landowner is dealing with acres of stream bank, a detention pond or a small back yard, but it’s not meant to replace basic maintenance, said Brian Cash, owner of EWE-niversally Green sheep rental service in Dunwoody. “We’re not a lawn mowing service,” Cash said. “We’ll do that, but we like to focus on overgrown yards and lots.” Cash often works with new homeowners in and around downtown Atlanta who have purchased foreclosed homes with overgrown lawns and local government agencies needing to clear brush from public lands. Sheep and goats are most useful when an area is so overgrown that no one else wants to clear it out. Even if its just a small yard, most homeowners, and many landscapers, don’t want to work in an area that’s choked with poison ivy, poison oak and briars, he said. Sheep and goats are also useful in areas that are too steep or too wooded to use a tractor to clear out brush. “If you can do it with a bush hog on a tractor, then that would be cheaper, but if you need a guy with a weed whacker out there, then I’m cheaper,” said herdswoman Jennif Chandler, of Shady Brook Farm in Colbert. Chandler and her sheep have worked with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences on the Athens campus to clear invasive plants including privet, kudzu and honeysuckle from along the bank of the Oconee River. She also works with homeowners in the Athens area to clear Kudzu covered hills and backyards. While goats and sheep are a surefire and efficient way to clear out a choked backyard or lot, there are a few things that homeowners should consider before buying a half-dozen goats or even hiring a service like Cash or Chandler’s. They’ll eat everything While herdsmen and women out on the West Coast are training goats and sheep to nibble around delicate plants like grape vines and other crops, targeted grazing isn’t a technique homeowners would want to try around their prize hydrangeas or a heirloom rose bush. In fact, some ornamental plants are seriously toxic to sheep or goats. Examples include azaleas and Japanese yew. “They’re not very discriminant,” said Sarah Workman, an Extension Agroforestry Specialist with the CAES. “If there’s something you don’t want them to eat, you need to protect it.” While goats and sheep eat pretty much the same thing, sheep prefer broad-leaf weeds like ivy or kudzu, and goats seem to prefer woodier plants, Cash said. Sheep usually can clear an area up to about a five-foot height, but goats can climb and take care of plants up to seven feet off the ground. Because of their climbing ability, goats can take care of larger plants. However, that skill and natural curiosity, makes them more likely to escape and antagonize neighborhood dogs. Cash usually sends a few goats along with his sheep herd to get the best of both worlds, but he’s careful to select his best-behaved goats. Graze, wait and repeat If a homeowner’s goal is to eradicate a specific invasive species, it may take repeated grazing to accomplish that goal, Workman said. She and Chandler organized the first targeted grazing demonstration at UGA last year. The project, an effort to remove privet from a portion of the River Road area, is ongoing.” These invasive plants are invasive because they are so persistent,” Workman said. “The idea is that the repeated introduction of the animals will deplete the root reserve of the (invasive) shrub.” The shrubby stuff and woody vines are things that need repeated browsing,” Workman said. “And hopefully the more they’re eaten and knocked back, the less strength they have to regrow.” Chandler’s sheep are scheduled to be back in action this summer to continue the eradication effort. Managing the herd takes expertiseHerdsmen and women, like Cash and Chandler, have worked with their animals long enough to know how they’ll graze a specific area and how to meet homeowners’ goals for targeted grazing. Their customers get the benefit of that expertise when they rent their herds. Another option is for a homeowner to purchase a few sheep or goats, but they need to be ready for the responsibility, said Will Getz, professor of animal science at Fort Valley State University’s Georgia Small Ruminant Research and Extension Center. Zoning laws prohibit many suburban and urban homeowners from keeping any goats or sheep in their backyard. Additionally, suburban, urban and even rural landowners will face the challenge of keeping their herds contained and safe from neighborhood dogs or coyotes. Moreover, there is the matter of food. An acre of grass and brush can support about a half-dozen goats or sheep over the long-term, Getz said. If a landowner wants to load their land with more than six sheep or goats per acre, they’ll clear it out quickly. “If you exceed that stocking intensity, then the animals are going to clear the area out more quickly,” Getz said. “But then you need to be prepared to sell them or otherwise get them off of your land when they’ve finished, either that or start buying feed.” Homeowners interested it either renting or buying goats or sheep to clear their land should contact their local UGA or FVSU Cooperative Extension agent and the zoning or public development office in their county or city.last_img read more

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National Ag Teacher Day

first_imgJason Peake was destined to teach agriculture. It’s in his DNA.Peake, an associate professor of agricultural education at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in Tifton, has a family full of ag teachers. His younger brother (Justin Michael Peake) and sister-in-law (Tiphanie) are also ag teachers, and Peake’s uncle (Howard Peake) was an ag teacher in central Kentucky, where Peake grew up. “My uncle Howard was an honest man who worked hard and tried to do the right thing,” Peake said. “I always held him up as a role model and decided I wanted to be like him. He’s the one that inspired me to become an ag teacher.”That inspiration has led to a 17-year teaching career for Peake.“It is the greatest job in the world,” Peake said. “It’s high-impact with a smaller group of students. It is one of the most impactful positions that you can have to influence young people and turn their lives around. You can reach those young people while they are still malleable. You can have a hand in molding them and that makes a real difference in that student’s life.”Peake began teaching high school agriculture classes in 1997 in Lakeland, Fla. He moved to UGA in February, 2004. During Peake’s teaching tenure, he has had a direct impact in the development of agriculture teachers across the Southeast. Those students include UGA graduates like Michael Barnes. “I can easily say that 100 percent of what he taught is definitely applicable and effective in the classroom,” said Barnes, a UGA CAES Tifton campus graduate who is now a second-year ag teacher at Lowndes High School in Valdosta. In his 10 years at UGA, Peake has taught some 90 undergraduate students with 65 to 70 of those eventually becoming ag teachers. “It’s a good feeling. It’s very flattering and humbling that someone thought enough of what you do to follow in your footsteps and choose the same career path as you,” Peake said. Not all of Peake’s students pursue a career in teaching agriculture. Though there is a high demand for ag teachers around the state, geography plays a key role in students finding a job. Many are faced with the dilemma of having to move, which is not a viable option for some.As a result, many of Peake’s students take a science teaching position at a local school, and that is just fine with Peake. “I still consider those students a success because they’re carrying the message of agriculture, the importance of it, into the science classroom or the math classroom and still pushing that message across. I am happy to see my students enter the world of education and promote agricultural literacy,” he said.Peake is also happy to assist his former pupils in whatever ag-related activity they’re working on. He recently helped former students Brittaney Schwing, an ag teacher at Northeast Campus of Tifton County High School in Tifton, and Adrien Gentry, an ag teacher at Colquitt County High School, with their respective FFA officer elections. Even though Peake is almost two decades removed from teaching high school, he keeps in touch with many of his former students, including six that are now ag teachers.“I’m very close with my former students. I stay active in the Georgia ag education conferences, so that twice a year I am able to reconnect with my former students in person,” Peake said.For more information about UGA Tifton’s academic program, visit students.caes.last_img read more

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Endowed Professor

first_imgUniversity of Georgia Professor Samuel Aggrey has earned the Richard B. Russell Professorship in Agriculture.Established by the Richard B. Russell Foundation through a generous gift, the endowed professorship is meant to support innovative research and teaching that advances agricultural science, research and conservation.Aggrey is internationally known for his research in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Department of Poultry Science.”I’m so thankful to have a researcher of Dr. Aggrey’s caliber with us on faculty in the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia,” said Todd Applegate, head of the Department of Poultry Science. “His research has spanned numerous areas, including nutrigenomics, as well as developing our understanding of individual bird and tissue responses during a disease or other stressors. Additionally, over his career, he’s been at the forefront of developing our future scientists not only through his lab at UGA, but also in partnerships with other universities and nongovernmental agencies throughout the world, especially in Africa. My heartfelt congratulations go out to Dr. Aggrey for this honor.”Aggrey said the honor will allow him to expand his research program and attract a higher caliber of graduate students into the program, purchase laboratory equipment and help him establish an international lecture.“I feel that this appointment recognizes the work we have done in my research program. Such recognition provides a prestige and authority in the field in which you are working, which allows you to attract more grants and also helps in recruiting graduate students,” Aggrey said. “The primary goal of academics is to make a contribution — in your department, in your college, in your university and in the world. I am very pleased to have received this honor, but with or without recognition, I believe you should try to do everything that is expected of you and more.”Aggrey plans to use support from the professorship to advance his lab’s research into stressors on poultry production, including heat stress and Eimeria, a genus of parasites that includes various species capable of causing the disease coccidiosis in poultry and other animals. “Normally when you start any new research program it takes three to five years to gain traction in that subject. We have really gained a lot of insight in this area and we are systematically trying to unravel all of the mysteries around it,” he said. “You also don’t get to where you are just by yourself.”Aggrey is currently collaborating with Romdhane Rekaya in the UGA Department of Animal and Dairy Science, Adelumola Oladeinde with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, Lilong Chai in the UGA Department of Poultry Science, Martin Wagner at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Austria, and other scientists at the International Livestock Research Institute, Kenya; University of Ghana; and Cairo University. An expert in developing genetic markers that help poultry breeders produce more disease-resistant, feed-efficient and heat-tolerant bird, Aggrey is a leading expert in the study of nutrigenomics. His lab is also investigating how feed components, parasite load and genetics impact the birds’ microbiome and gut health. He is co-editor of the definitive texts “Poultry Genetics, Breeding and Biotechnology” and “Advances in Poultry Genomics and Genetics.” He is internationally sought-after to conduct trainings on breeding methods.Since joining CAES in 2000, Aggrey has received the 2013 D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Research, the 2014 Poultry Science Association Broiler Research Award and a 2016 Carnegie Fellowship.To learn more about the Department of Poultry Science, visit poultry.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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National Life Records Strong Gains in 2004

first_imgNational Life Records Strong GainsIn Financial Results and Sales in 2004Montpelier, Vt. (March 4, 2005) – The National Life Group recorded a strong increase in net income in 2004, along with solid growth in total sales and positive investment returns.Net income on a consolidated basis, including all the companies within the National Life Group, was $86 million, an increase of more than 11% over the previous year and a record level for the company.Results across most product lines were also strong, with each of the Group’s sales divisions posting increases over the previous year. Annuity sales increased 29%, the company’s Sentinel Funds sales again exceeded $1 billion, with life sales down slightly from the previous record year. An overall life milestone was reached by the company in 2004, however, when it reached a total of $50 billion in life insurance in force.The National Life Group’s total gross revenue exceeded the $1 billion level for the seventh consecutive year, reaching $1.3 billion. The company paid over $500 million in policy benefits and policyholder dividends in 2004, an increase of some $75 million over the previous year.Total assets under management of the National Life Group reached a record $17.2 billion, up 6.5% over the previous year, and total equity rose to an all-time high of $1.2 billion.”From virtually every standpoint and measure of achievement, 2004 was an exceptional year for the National Life Group,” said Thomas H. MacLeay, the company’s chairman, president and CEO. “These strong results help create greater financial security for those who own or benefit from the company’s products, and our growth in capitalization gives the National Life Group additional resources that provide security against unforeseen events and to support continuing growth.”The National Life Group is composed of the flagship company, National Life Insurance Company, founded in Montpelier in 1850, NL Capital Management Company, the Sentinel Companies, Equity Services, Inc., Life Insurance Company of the Southwest, of Dallas, Texas, and American Guaranty & Trust Company of Wilmington, Delaware.###last_img read more

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James S. Fry, Esq. of Champlain College admitted to the US Supreme Court Bar

first_imgJames S. Fry, Esq. of Champlain College has been admitted to the United States Supreme Court Bar. A professor of paralegal studies and business administration at Champlain for 20 years, Fry has joined a select group of attorneys to be been sworn in by a US Chief Justice.The October 15 ceremony began with coffee and an informal chat with Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the conference room of the Court. Fry then joined other alumni of Catholic Universitys Columbus School of Law for the professional thrill of standing with hand raised to repeat an oath administered within the chambers of the Supreme Court. Following the ceremony, he enjoyed a tour of the Court building.”It is more of an honor than anything else, but the practical side is that by being admitted to the United States Supreme Court Bar it allows you to practice before the Supreme Court,” Fry said. The qualifications are three years in practice, good standing with ones state Supreme Court Bar, and sponsorship from two attorneys who are already members of the US Supreme Court Bar. Fry now has privileges to listen to oral arguments at the Supreme Court and use the Court library.Fry attended law school in the early 1980s after having earned a graduate degree from UVM and working for 12 years. After passing the Bar exam, he practiced full time in the Vermont courts, and in 1987 he was admitted to practice in the U.S. Federal District Court. “I thought this next step-being admitted to the US Supreme Court Bar-would be appropriate as this is my 25th year out of law school,” Fry said.With teaching at Champlain College, Fry reduced his practice to part time. He teaches a variety of legal courses at Champlain including Business Law, Fundamentals of Legal Research, Legal Analysis and Writing, Constitutional Law and Real Property Law. He also serves as the program coordinator for the well-established Paralegal Studies program.last_img read more

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Merchants Bank opens new Rutland office

first_imgExecutive Vice President Thomas S Leavitt announced that the newest office of Merchants Bank celebrated its Grand Opening on January 15. The new facility, located at 92 Woodstock Avenue in Rutland, replaces and doubles the capacity of the previously operating branch at that same location.The new full-service ADA-compliant branch includes four lobby teller stations; two drive-up service lanes; an additional ATM drive-up lane; and offices for Community Banking, Corporate Banking, Government Banking and customer service.Special events for the Grand Opening included a book signing by James A. “Buddy” Edgerton and Nan O’Brien, authors of “The Unknown Rockwell.” Bank hospitality also included refreshments and tours of the new facility. A ribbon cutting and bank official remarks complemented presentations of special donations to the Rutland City Rescue Mission and Neighborworks of Western Vermont.Leavitt stated this facility is the fifth Connor Contracting of Berlin and St. Albans, VT has constructed for the Bank. “We are very pleased with the great Vermont craftsmanship and working relationship with have with Connor. These beautiful and comfortable surroundings offer a great place to welcome and serve our customers.”“The space is a warm and inviting environment for both customers and staff,” adds Deanna Wetherby Branch President. “Our new Woodstock Avenue home presents a wonderful opportunity to bring the best of service to our existing customers and reach out to new friends as Vermont’s independent statewide bank.”Merchants Bank’s new Woodstock Avenue branchFrom left to right:  Michelle LaMoria, Market Manager, Merchants Banker; Tammy Duclos, Rutland City Mission Rescue; Kevin Coleman, Alderman, City of Rutland; Deanna Wetherby, Branch President; Nan O’Brien, Co-author, “The Unknown Rockwell”; Jim Edgerton; Tom Bernheim, Publisher, “The Unknown Rockwell”; Alexis Williams, Merchants Banker; Amy Brown, Merchants Banker; James “Buddy” Edgerton, Co-author, “The Unknown Rockwell”; Kristy Cardi, Merchants Banker; Tom Leavitt, Executive Vice President; Jamiee Kuhl, Merchants Banker; Wayne Hickey, Merchants Banker; Mike Tuttle, President and CEO; and Ludy Biddle, Neighborworks of Western VermontVermont Matters. Merchants Bank strives to fulfill its role as the state’s leading independent community bank through a wide range of initiatives. The bank supports organizations throughout Vermont in addressing essential needs, sustaining community programs, providing small business and job start capital, funding financial literacy education and delivering enrichment through local sports activities.  Merchants Bank was established in 1849 in Burlington. Its continuing mission is to provide Vermonters with a statewide community bank that combines a strong technology platform with a genuine appreciation for local markets. Merchants Bank delivers this commitment through a branch-based system that includes: 34 community bank offices and 42 ATMs throughout Vermont; local branch presidents and personal bankers dedicated to high-quality customer service; free online banking, phone banking, and electronic bill payment services; high-value depositing programs that feature Free Checking for Life®, Cash Rewards Checking, Rewards Checking for Business, business cash management, money market accounts, health savings accounts, certificates of deposit, Flexible CD, IRAs, and overdraft assurance; feature-rich loan programs including mortgages, home equity credit, vehicle loans, personal and small business loans and lines of credit; and merchant card processing. Merchants Bank offers a strong set of commercial and government banking solutions, delivered by experienced banking officers in markets throughout the state; these teams provide customized financing for medium-to-large companies, non-profits, cities, towns and school districts. Merchants Trust Company, a division of Merchants Bank, provides investment management, financial planning and trustee services.Please visit www.mbvt.com(link is external) for access to Merchants Bank information, programs and services. Merchants’ stock is traded on the NASDAQ National Market system under the symbol MBVT. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. .For information about the Rutland City Rescue Mission and Neighborworks of Western Vermont please visit http://vermontpet.com/mission/(link is external) and http://www.nwwvt.org/(link is external) respectively.last_img read more

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Ledyard Financial reports big gain in first quarter

first_imgAs of 03/31/2010 As of 03/31/2009Total Assets Ledyard Financial Group, Inc.Selected Financial Highlights(Unaudited) Investment Securities Source: HANOVER, N.H.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– Ledyard Financial Group, Inc. 4.26.2010 $388,175,219 $3,650,842 15.97% 200,111,088 $31.06 Stockholders Equity Provision for Loan Losses Allowance as a % of Total Loans 3,201,076 33,567,069 Total Interest Expense 226,678,994 Non-interest Income 1,850,586 797,014 1,212,973 $5,887,298 0.97%Allowance for Loan Losses Net Income 666,593 3.15% $0.31 3,913,415 $0.42 Dividends Per Common Share 300,885,068 3,095,172 433,578 158,378,063 $3,892,186center_img $375,760,980 $6,501,534 14.52%Non-performing Assets $4,414,048 Total Risk Based Capital Ratio 950,000 Book Value per Common Share Outstanding Total Deposits Non-interest Expense 36,589,092 1.44% Non-performing Assets as a % of Total Assets 41,961,495 Loans Receivable, net Earnings Per Common Share, basic 31,734,924 03/31/2009 $32.83 150,000 03/31/2010 For the Three Months Ended 3,200,868 FHLB Advances & Other Borrowings $0.65 Total Interest Income 2.53%          Net Interest Income $5,574,810 Ledyard Financial Group, Inc (ticker symbol LFGP), the holding company for Ledyard National Bank, reported net income for the quarter ended March 31, 2010 of $666,593, or $0.65 per share compared to $433,578 or $0.42 per share for the same period in 2009, an increase of $233,015 or 53.74%. Our total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2010 was $4.9 million, compared to $4.8 million for the same period in 2009. Net Interest Income for the three months ended March 31, 2010 was $3,095,172, compared to $3,201,076 for the same period in 2009. A decrease in loan balances was the primary factor contributing to the decrease in Net Interest Income.For the quarter ended March 31, 2010, $150,000 was added to the allowance for loan losses ( Allowance ) compared to $950,000 for the same period in 2009. The total Allowance was $6.5 million at March 31, 2010, compared to $5.9 million for the same period in 2009. Total non-performing loans were $5.57 million at March 31, 2010, compared to $3.7 million for the same period in 2009.Ledyard Financial Advisors, a division of Ledyard National Bank, reported revenue for the quarter ended March 31, 2010 of $1,451,915, compared to $1,163,929 for the same period in 2009. Revenue from new business for the first quarter was $121,140, compared to $163,123 for the prior year. Assets under management and custody at Ledyard Financial Advisors totaled $825 million as of quarter end, an increase of $230 million over the prior year.At March 31, 2010, the Company s shareholders equity stood at $33.6 million, compared to $31.7 million for the same period in 2009. All of the Company s capital ratios are well in excess of the amount required by the Federal Reserve for a bank holding company to be considered well capitalized. At March 31, 2010, the Company s book value per share stood at $32.83 compared to $31.06 for the same period in 2009.Loans, net of the allowance for loan losses at March 31, 2010, were $200.1 million, compared to $226.7 for the same period last year. Total Deposits at March 31, 2010 were $316.3 million, an increase of $15.4 million from the same period last year. Total Assets of the Company were $388.2 million at March 31, 2010, an increase of $12.4 million over the prior year. Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank increased by $4.9 million from $19.8 million at March 31, 2009 to $24.7 million at March 31, 2010.A quarterly cash dividend of $.31 per share was declared on April 22, 2010 to shareholders of record as of May 7, 2010, payable June 4, 2010.Ledyard Financial Group, Inc., headquartered in Hanover, New Hampshire, is the holding company for Ledyard National Bank. Ledyard National Bank, founded in 1991, is a full service community bank offering a broad range of banking, investment, tax and wealth management services in the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee Region. Ledyard National Bank has eight offices with locations in Hanover, Lebanon, Lyme, New London, and West Lebanon, New Hampshire and in Norwich, Vermont.Ledyard Financial Group, Inc. shares can be bought and sold through the NASD sanctioned Pink Sheets under the trading symbol LFGP. Shares may be traded through an individual s broker. For more information, please refer to the Investor Relations section of the bank s website at www.ledyardbank.com(link is external) or contact the Company s Chief Financial Officer, Gregory D. Steverson. $0.31 100,551,282 1,569,271 316,271,435last_img read more

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Pete’s Greens and CAE to create new Vermont Farm Fund

first_imgA new fund, organized by Pete’s Greens and the Center for an Agricultural Economy (CAE), aimed to help Vermont agricultural organizations, is on the fast track to becoming a reality. Pete Johnson, owner of Pete’s Greens, and Monty Fischer, Executive Director of CAE met recently to outline the details to create the Vermont Farm Fund. Plans include the creation of an advisory board by the end of March and focusing the funding towards innovative and progressive agricultural efforts by Vermont farms, including support for farm-to-school initiatives, emergency farm relief and exploring the establishment of small farm loan funds.‘We are setting an aggressive pace to get the Vermont Farm Fund going so donations can be received immediately,’ said Pete Johnson. ‘In addition, a few years from now, Pete’s Greens will begin to reinvest the money that was donated by the community to help us rebuild. We are committed to paying that money forward and to making sure that the funding donated to us will do more good work down the line.’Pete’s Greens barn which housed its processing facility, equipment, supplies and food burned to the ground in mid-January. Since then the farm has received over $130,000 in donations as a result of statewide community efforts and individual donations, including a large online auction, a concert, local dinners and events. As donations began to roll in, Johnson and his staff felt strongly that they wanted to embrace the spirit of supporting Vermont agriculture for which the donations were given and the idea to ‘pay it forward’ was born.  As a non-profit dedicated to supporting the efforts of small farms and progressive agricultural pursuits, the Center for an Agricultural Economy will house the fund and oversee the process.Pete’s Greens is a four season organic vegetable farm located in Craftsbury, VT and owned by Peter Johnson. The farm’s top priority is growing a wide variety of crops to feed Vermonters year round. The weekly food delivery program Good Eats is based on the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) model in which customers pay up front for vegetables and other farm products receiving a share each week. Shares at Pete’s Greens save members an average of 18% per week over retail prices. Pete’s Greens vegetables are also sold at regional stores and restaurants as well as local farmers’ markets. More information is available at www.PetesGreens.com(link is external).The Center for an Agricultural Economy (CAE) is a non-profit organization based in Hardwick, VT that focuses on supporting a healthy, ecological and economical local food system, through community involvement and education as well as research and small agricultural business support. In the spring, CAE will operate the newly built Vermont Food Venture Center, an incubator kitchen with a focus on value-added agricultural products.  More information is available at www.hardwickagriculture.org(link is external). Craftsbury, VT., March 9, 2011’last_img read more

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